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Math, science, or other
Poll runs till 28 Nov 2017, 12:55 am
Math 30%  30%  [ 3 ]
Science 40%  40%  [ 4 ]
Other 30%  30%  [ 3 ]
Total votes : 10

Timdil
Butterfly
Butterfly

Joined: 17 Nov 2017
Age: 13
Gender: Male
Posts: 11
Location: Canada

18 Nov 2017, 12:55 am

I'm thirteen I was diagnosed with Asperger's half a month ago and I'm looking for someone who's into science or math



billegge
Blue Jay
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Joined: 12 Sep 2017
Age: 48
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Posts: 92
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18 Nov 2017, 1:28 am

Timdil wrote:
I'm thirteen I was diagnosed with Asperger's half a month ago and I'm looking for someone who's into science or math


I am 48, and would love to give my knowledge to someone young.

Schools don't get into the detail of math, they are not hands on and just tell you how to do things without explaining it, and the result is not being able to understand math. You can't use it if you don't understand it.

My son is 7 years old, he can multiply and he fully understands multiplication. I taught him in the car while driving to school. Recently I taught him how to count in different bases, for example in binary. He can count and add in binary, not as a memorized method but he fully understands it.

He was able to learn because I taught him by asking him questions, not by "telling" him. For example, to teach multiplication you create groups and ask them to count how many there are and how many groups there are and how many are in each group. To answer those questions only requires knowing how to add. Then you ask a question, "how many would 3 groups of 2 be?". They would then add that up in their head. Once they grasp the concept of groups then you can tell him that 3 times 2 means 3 groups of 2. So, the child discovers multiplication on his own. Further teaching follows the same pattern. What is very very important is that you should start with word problems before the more abstract math because the thats the foundation of the abstract math. If you don't get the foundation, the abstract will not be understandable.



BCTucker
Tufted Titmouse
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Joined: 27 Oct 2017
Age: 27
Gender: Female
Posts: 31
Location: Iowa

18 Nov 2017, 1:19 pm

billegge wrote:
For example, to teach multiplication you create groups and ask them to count how many there are and how many groups there are and how many are in each group. To answer those questions only requires knowing how to add. Then you ask a question, "how many would 3 groups of 2 be?". They would then add that up in their head. Once they grasp the concept of groups then you can tell him that 3 times 2 means 3 groups of 2. So, the child discovers multiplication on his own.


I taught myself multiplication like this when I was about that age, maybe just a hair younger. I don't know how I figured it out on my own, but there were definitely no adults that showed me how to do it that way.

"Practical math" is kind of a special interest of mine, I guess. Like this week I was engrossed in calculating the caloric intake for a horse I have that needs to gain weight. Then taking the caloric intake he needed and applying it to all the different brands of feed to see how much I'd need of each, then comparing prices on all of them to see which would be the best caloric value for the price. Then taking the increased caloric intake against his daily energy requirement to see how long it would take him to gain weight. I have notebooks full of this kind of "farm math". I love it.



billegge
Blue Jay
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Joined: 12 Sep 2017
Age: 48
Gender: Male
Posts: 92
Location: Lat: 27.889636 Long: -82.665982

18 Nov 2017, 3:24 pm

BCTucker wrote:
"Practical math" is kind of a special interest of mine, I guess. Like this week I was engrossed in calculating the caloric intake for a horse I have that needs to gain weight. Then taking the caloric intake he needed and applying it to all the different brands of feed to see how much I'd need of each, then comparing prices on all of them to see which would be the best caloric value for the price. Then taking the increased caloric intake against his daily energy requirement to see how long it would take him to gain weight. I have notebooks full of this kind of "farm math". I love it.


Weird, went through the exact formulas you just described when I decided to lose weight. I looked up the average calorie intake of a person, looked up the conversion between calories and weight, decided the amount of calories per day I wanted to lose and thus how long it would take. My human version of your best caloric value for price was to use hunger in place of price. I ate chicken because it took longer for my stomach to digest it. Everyone else used weight loss programs, which made no sense to me if everything was based on calories. I don't think anyone understood me when I explained how I was losing weight.

Btw - I found that it took a while to start losing weight, but when I did then it went fast. Its like my body was thinking, "uh, I don't know what to do here - were not eating enough.".. then "Oh I get it, we need to lose weight.... drop".



AnonymousAnonymous
Veteran
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Joined: 23 Nov 2006
Age: 27
Gender: Male
Posts: 41,500
Location: Portland, Oregon

20 Nov 2017, 7:09 pm

Welcome to Wrong Planet! :)

I was 13 when I was diagnosed with AS, but had no idea what my specialist was talking about.

I had other things on my mind at the time of my diagnosis.


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Silly NTs, I have Aspergers, and having Aspergers is gr-r-reat!