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SteelMaiden
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26 Feb 2013, 4:54 am

Does anyone else here have a visual processing disorder? Is it more common in autism to have this?

I have problems with descending medium-to-long flights of stairs; the steps move and jump about and the floor moves and rocks about. I find I have to stop every 15-20 steps and look at the ceiling to "reset" my vision. Yesterday I tried to descend a very long flight of stairs at Highgate Underground Station (the escalator was broken so I had no choice) and I nearly fell down the stairs several times. At two points I had to stand still and close my eyes. For the whole time, I was gripping the hand rail extra hard. It was very distressing.

Does anyone have any suggestions for how I can get around this? I am claustrophobic and I have a severe phobia of lifts (elevators) so I cannot use those.

I also cannot drive (and have a disabled travel pass for London public transport) and cannot play team sports, as well as having dyspraxia symptoms relevant to my visual processing disorder.

I'm not getting any support for this disorder at all. Do you think I should?


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I am classic autistic with communication difficulties. I also have neurological problems (including visual-vestibular processing disorder and sensory ataxia). I am a pharmacology student with full time support.


AliceInAspieland
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26 Feb 2013, 6:47 am

I think that finding out what support options are out there. It's obviously causing you distress, so be proactive. Even just the feeling of doing something might give you a bit of an emotional or mental boost.

Would glasses with different coloured lenses help, similar to the ones used to help people with dyslexia?

Hopefully, someone can give you some better advice than I. Good luck!


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Toadstool
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26 Feb 2013, 7:50 am

I have dyspraxia and I know what you mean about the stairs.
I don't know any answers- I am waiting for an appointment with an opthalmologist to have my binocular tracking tested. I am considering coloured lenses if that would help but doing the binocular tracking thing first.



Mummy_of_Peanut
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26 Feb 2013, 8:04 am

It sounds like you have problems with your vestibular sense (which tells us whether we're right side up or down and/or kinesthetic sense (which tells us out body position). I too have issues with these, often miss the bottom step and land somewhere in the middle of the room. I've also fallen out of a patio door and landed flat on my face on the wooden deck. The fact that I've never done myself a serious injury is nothing short of a miracle, although I'm nursing what I'm pretty certain is a broken pinky toe, which I whacked against a plug block, which caused me to fall into the wardrobe. I don't drive either, partly because of these problems, which I assume is the cause of my major issues with mirrors.

Strangely, my daughter, the one with the diagnosis, has no problems with these senses. However, she has been prescribed tinted glasses, for her processing problems. I'm going to get myself tested and I've no doubt I can be helped with a pair too. Being tested for specs won't do any harm.


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franknfurter
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26 Feb 2013, 12:32 pm

SteelMaiden wrote:
Does anyone else here have a visual processing disorder? Is it more common in autism to have this?

I have problems with descending medium-to-long flights of stairs; the steps move and jump about and the floor moves and rocks about. I find I have to stop every 15-20 steps and look at the ceiling to "reset" my vision. Yesterday I tried to descend a very long flight of stairs at Highgate Underground Station (the escalator was broken so I had no choice) and I nearly fell down the stairs several times. At two points I had to stand still and close my eyes. For the whole time, I was gripping the hand rail extra hard. It was very distressing.

Does anyone have any suggestions for how I can get around this? I am claustrophobic and I have a severe phobia of lifts (elevators) so I cannot use those.

I also cannot drive (and have a disabled travel pass for London public transport) and cannot play team sports, as well as having dyspraxia symptoms relevant to my visual processing disorder.

I'm not getting any support for this disorder at all. Do you think I should?


have you tried not too look at the stairs, if you have railings to hold onto you could try that, i have the same problem with anything with lines, or escalators and also graph paper for some reason.



franknfurter
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26 Feb 2013, 12:35 pm

Mummy_of_Peanut wrote:
It sounds like you have problems with your vestibular sense (which tells us whether we're right side up or down and/or kinesthetic sense (which tells us out body position). I too have issues with these, often miss the bottom step and land somewhere in the middle of the room. I've also fallen out of a patio door and landed flat on my face on the wooden deck. The fact that I've never done myself a serious injury is nothing short of a miracle, although I'm nursing what I'm pretty certain is a broken pinky toe, which I whacked against a plug block, which caused me to fall into the wardrobe. I don't drive either, partly because of these problems, which I assume is the cause of my major issues with mirrors.

Strangely, my daughter, the one with the diagnosis, has no problems with these senses. However, she has been prescribed tinted glasses, for her processing problems. I'm going to get myself tested and I've no doubt I can be helped with a pair too. Being tested for specs won't do any harm.


is your balance problem something to do with a damaged vestibular system then, i have the same problem but was diagnosed with vestibular hypofunction which means my right side of my vestibular system does not work well, but it causes the kind of problems you have mentioned.



Tyri0n
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26 Feb 2013, 12:54 pm

SteelMaiden wrote:
Does anyone else here have a visual processing disorder? Is it more common in autism to have this?

I have problems with descending medium-to-long flights of stairs; the steps move and jump about and the floor moves and rocks about. I find I have to stop every 15-20 steps and look at the ceiling to "reset" my vision. Yesterday I tried to descend a very long flight of stairs at Highgate Underground Station (the escalator was broken so I had no choice) and I nearly fell down the stairs several times. At two points I had to stand still and close my eyes. For the whole time, I was gripping the hand rail extra hard. It was very distressing.

Does anyone have any suggestions for how I can get around this? I am claustrophobic and I have a severe phobia of lifts (elevators) so I cannot use those.

I also cannot drive (and have a disabled travel pass for London public transport) and cannot play team sports, as well as having dyspraxia symptoms relevant to my visual processing disorder.

I'm not getting any support for this disorder at all. Do you think I should?


Yes, I'm like you in some ways, though not as bad anymore. My dad did basic vision therapy with me as a child that helped with a lot of my issues, so at least I can drive. I'm doing more intensive vision therapy now. You should look into it for sure.

Yes, it is more common in autism to have this. I have/had strabismus and accommodative dysfunction (problems processing movement). Lazy eye when younger.

I am reading a book right now that implicates some of these issues in misdiagnosed schizophrenia as well (in some cases), so OP, I think you posted about schizophrenia once before, so you should DEFINITELY see an optometrist.

Here's the book: http://www.amazon.com/Seeing-Through-Ne ... ren+autism . I'm actually working through these things with a professional optometrist right now.



Last edited by Tyri0n on 26 Feb 2013, 1:00 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Tuttle
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26 Feb 2013, 12:57 pm

Tinted lenses!



kouzoku
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26 Feb 2013, 1:00 pm

I often "lose my place" on the stairs, too and end up tripping. I've always wondered what it could be. I also run into doorways and such. It's like my body's GPS malfunctions. Should I be getting help for this? I have sustained some serious bruises from this and am really scared I'll fall down a long flight of stairs one day. 8O



kouzoku
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26 Feb 2013, 1:09 pm

Okay, I looked up dyspraxia and I have almost all of the symptoms. Do tinted lenses really help? How?



Noetic
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26 Feb 2013, 1:21 pm

My "coping mechanism" has been for years to move about almost like a blind person, never quite looking at things. I do have rare moments where I suddenly have fully functioning 3D vision but they are very rare indeed.



Tyri0n
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26 Feb 2013, 1:25 pm

kouzoku wrote:
Okay, I looked up dyspraxia and I have almost all of the symptoms. Do tinted lenses really help? How?


Yes, as the book I linked to explains, dyspraxia is a symptom of visual dysfunction, and these can help with binocular vision.

http://www.latitudes.org/articles/amb_lens.html



kouzoku
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26 Feb 2013, 1:30 pm

I have an eye appointment on Wednesday so I'm going to bring this up.



Tyri0n
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26 Feb 2013, 1:32 pm

kouzoku wrote:
I have an eye appointment on Wednesday so I'm going to bring this up.


A normal eye doctor (opthamologist) likely won't test for these things. You should see an optometrist, which is a doctor who specializes in the treatment of visual dysfunction, as opposed to visual acuity.



kouzoku
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26 Feb 2013, 1:45 pm

My appointment is actually with a retina specialist, but I figure he might have heard of it and can direct me to a good ophthalmologist.