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minervx
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31 Aug 2011, 2:14 am

In the English language, we assign too many different definitions to one word, making the use of it unclear and ambiguous at time. The word "maturity" is a prime example.

Many people can classify someone as mature, or immature, as a black or white all or nothing label. But its not that simple, in my opinion.

I think maturity, has a separate spectrum for multiple aspects of a person, so a person could be mature in one aspect, but not mature in another.

Here are the 8 ways i classify maturity:

(1) Developmental - This regards the functions of the physical body such as puberty and aging. It is the simplest, most basic, most superficially obvious part of maturity to detect.

(Although there is often a strong correlation between age and maturity, being given a lot of time on this planet does not automatically mean the time will be used efficiently. I'm sure you've seen examples of some people in their 30's who are more mature overall than some people in their 50's.)

(2) Academic - Having knowledge on abstract matters or solving specific problems within a field. For example, your knowledge of underwater ecosystems, philosophic writings, and the current events that are going on right now. Understanding our world as a whole.

(3) Empirical - Being experienced in many firsthand situations. Facing challenges and overcoming adversities. There are people who may have had children in their teens, changed jobs often, gotten in fights, been in numerous relationships, had a life or death experience, undergone drastic changes in their lives, and more.

(For example, someone who may stay indoors to avoid social situations and read books instead. They may have a lot of "book smarts", but lack "street smarts". Such an imbalance may create a lopsided view of oneself. Being a genius in one's head and intellectual discussions, but then in practical life situations feel so lowly of oneself. A person may be really intelligent and well informed, but may not be taken seriously, if they do not have the empirical maturity of learning from their own experiences as well as experiences which are second hand. That may be why a college student may wonder why he is being taken less seriously than an older blue collar worker who has twice the life experience and half the intelligence.)

(4) Emotional - Maintaining composure and keeping one's emotions stable. Knowing which emotions to use at what moment.

(Of course there's many different emotions, and everyone handles each one with a different level of maturity. One may have anger issues, while another person acts too silly and flippant like a child. If a person has emotional difficulty, they may be labeled as immature, quickly, at first impression. All it takes is for someone to see someone else act childish for one second to falsely conclude that that person has the maturity of a child, even though they may be very mature in 6, 7, and 8 among others.)

(5) Interpersonal - Being mature with people, respectful, diplomatic, conforming to social standards, and acting appropriately in social situations.

(Lack of social grace can be immediately picked up on, whereas it takes much more time to understand if a person is responsible, capable of larger thought, or very smart. Unfair, right?)

(6) Intrapersonal - "Know thyself". Understanding oneself ; knowing oneselfs wants/needs ; being open-minded and within the interest of one's personal growth.

(7) Responsibility - Being accountable for one's actions rather than blameshifting. Being proactive rather than making excuses. Not being dependent on others.

( 8 ) Larger Thought - Being able to see beyond the temporary and think beyond it. Being able to look at things objectively (not just from one's own perspective) and see things as a whole.

(In my opinion, this is the deepest, most important level of maturity. Unfortunately, it would take a very long time to understand if a person has this quality or not. So many people who have it are too often never given credit for it.)

It's really hard to weigh these factors and determine which one is most important, but the question of, is this person mature or not, is certainly one which should be given more thought.

I definitely want to hear your thoughts on this post.



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31 Aug 2011, 4:53 am

I think its brilliant, absolutely outstanding.

And it reinforces what I've been thinking, though merely from the premise of my own nature. People who don't know me well think that I'm incredibly immature because I make rude jokes. But they're always factually accurate, though probably incredibly offensive :P

But those who know me better say I'm incredibly mature, apparently I help them with their problems. I think they just need an Aspie for logical thought to them.

Anyway, that's just my self-centered opinion :P


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minervx
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31 Aug 2011, 9:45 am

Davuardo wrote:
I think its brilliant, absolutely outstanding.

And it reinforces what I've been thinking, though merely from the premise of my own nature. People who don't know me well think that I'm incredibly immature because I make rude jokes. But they're always factually accurate, though probably incredibly offensive :P

But those who know me better say I'm incredibly mature, apparently I help them with their problems. I think they just need an Aspie for logical thought to them.

Anyway, that's just my self-centered opinion :P


Thank you for your support.

And yes this is the problem Aspies have. The types of maturity that Aspies may not have (such as interpersonal or emotional) are more easily detected than types of maturity Aspies have much of. For example, an Aspie may act childish at times, with corny metaphors, out of place jokes, stimming, inappropriate emotions, or otherwise may act in an awkward manner in social situations. And people might instantly judge them as immature, even though they may be very mature in other regards such as long-term thought and intrapersonal. That is something I will always value over a person who may be able to act "normal" all of the time who has no vision or goals for their life.

Also, I suspect many Aspies overintellectualize things. Especially younger Aspies may be intelligent way beyond their years, but not taken seriously because they have little empirical experience. Staying inside and reading books to avoid socializing with people is not a balanced way to mature. Because people can instantly sense if you are innocent, have a child-like naivety, and had little real world experience. And having to switch roles between a professor and little kid can be very confusing.



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31 Aug 2011, 12:06 pm

I've been thinking about the different types of maturity lately. You said it perfectly.
You're smart. :)



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31 Aug 2011, 12:44 pm

I was gonna start a blog about something like that the other day but yea, people never think that I'm serious nor would I care, thats the impression some people seem to get of me but really on the inside, I'm more of a person who just likes to take their time and I'm actually pretty serious when it comes to planning my future ahead of me.

I look ridiculously young and yet, at times (especially serious situations), my mind is older than me.


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minervx
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31 Aug 2011, 12:53 pm

Thank you for the support.

And Ian I definitely understand what you are saying.



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31 Aug 2011, 5:29 pm

Good post.

Reminds me of this. At least in number.

http://www.verticalpool.com/8circuitbrain1.html


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TeaEarlGreyHot
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31 Aug 2011, 11:49 pm

minervx wrote:
In the English language, we assign too many different definitions to one word, making the use of it unclear and ambiguous at time. The word "maturity" is a prime example.

Many people can classify someone as mature, or immature, as a black or white all or nothing label. But its not that simple, in my opinion.

I think maturity, has a separate spectrum for multiple aspects of a person, so a person could be mature in one aspect, but not mature in another.

Here are the 8 ways i classify maturity:

(1) Developmental - This regards the functions of the physical body such as puberty and aging. It is the simplest, most basic, most superficially obvious part of maturity to detect.

(Although there is often a strong correlation between age and maturity, being given a lot of time on this planet does not automatically mean the time will be used efficiently. I'm sure you've seen examples of some people in their 30's who are more mature overall than some people in their 50's.)

(2) Academic - Having knowledge on abstract matters or solving specific problems within a field. For example, your knowledge of underwater ecosystems, philosophic writings, and the current events that are going on right now. Understanding our world as a whole.

(3) Empirical - Being experienced in many firsthand situations. Facing challenges and overcoming adversities. There are people who may have had children in their teens, changed jobs often, gotten in fights, been in numerous relationships, had a life or death experience, undergone drastic changes in their lives, and more.

(For example, someone who may stay indoors to avoid social situations and read books instead. They may have a lot of "book smarts", but lack "street smarts". Such an imbalance may create a lopsided view of oneself. Being a genius in one's head and intellectual discussions, but then in practical life situations feel so lowly of oneself. A person may be really intelligent and well informed, but may not be taken seriously, if they do not have the empirical maturity of learning from their own experiences as well as experiences which are second hand. That may be why a college student may wonder why he is being taken less seriously than an older blue collar worker who has twice the life experience and half the intelligence.)

(4) Emotional - Maintaining composure and keeping one's emotions stable. Knowing which emotions to use at what moment.

(Of course there's many different emotions, and everyone handles each one with a different level of maturity. One may have anger issues, while another person acts too silly and flippant like a child. If a person has emotional difficulty, they may be labeled as immature, quickly, at first impression. All it takes is for someone to see someone else act childish for one second to falsely conclude that that person has the maturity of a child, even though they may be very mature in 6, 7, and 8 among others.)

(5) Interpersonal - Being mature with people, respectful, diplomatic, conforming to social standards, and acting appropriately in social situations.

(Lack of social grace can be immediately picked up on, whereas it takes much more time to understand if a person is responsible, capable of larger thought, or very smart. Unfair, right?)

(6) Intrapersonal - "Know thyself". Understanding oneself ; knowing oneselfs wants/needs ; being open-minded and within the interest of one's personal growth.

(7) Responsibility - Being accountable for one's actions rather than blameshifting. Being proactive rather than making excuses. Not being dependent on others.

( 8 ) Larger Thought - Being able to see beyond the temporary and think beyond it. Being able to look at things objectively (not just from one's own perspective) and see things as a whole.

(In my opinion, this is the deepest, most important level of maturity. Unfortunately, it would take a very long time to understand if a person has this quality or not. So many people who have it are too often never given credit for it.)

It's really hard to weigh these factors and determine which one is most important, but the question of, is this person mature or not, is certainly one which should be given more thought.

I definitely want to hear your thoughts on this post.


This is a very nice break-down of maturity. I intended to take each part and comment on it, but it appears I have only one thing to say on it.

2 through 8 are often dependent on 1 since the brain (physical maturity) isn't fully developed until early to mid-twenties. You can sometimes find some 2-8 qualities matured on an adult level with someone that is 18 and younger, but from my experience it's quite rare.

Basically, what I'm getting at is 1 is the baseline for the rest.


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minervx
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01 Sep 2011, 9:47 am

Well in a persons younger years, from 15-25, yes.

But later on, people's brains will stop developing.



TeaEarlGreyHot
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01 Sep 2011, 3:42 pm

minervx wrote:
Well in a persons younger years, from 15-25, yes.

But later on, people's brains will stop developing.


Correct. After the brain has fully developed, it's really up to the individual and their life circumstances as to whether they mature in those areas or not.


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minervx
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01 Sep 2011, 6:08 pm

Physical maturity was not a big focus on this post. It was just for the circumstance that someone would say "you forgot physical maturity". The others are far more important.

Mainly I wanted to explore how people could be very mature in ways and very immature in other ways.

The gifted scholar with little life experience and naivety/innocence vs. The street smart person who is completely clueless about the world outside his immediate surroundings.

The person who is capable of larger thought and long term thinking but can act like a child in some social situations vs. a person who can ACT professional and conform socially but internally is myopic and has no goals/vision.

Not to suggest mutual exclusion though.

We all have strengths and weaknesses within the 8 types of maturity I mentioned, not to say that there arent people who have higher overall averages than others.