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LennytheWicked
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05 Oct 2012, 11:00 pm

I am, at this point, confident in my abilities to train dogs. [I've trained four to a point where they no longer bark at other dogs, pull, or snap when on the leash. Two were my own and the other two were my neighbor's.]

I talked it over with my parents; we've recently adopted a husky named Riley, and as he has a lot of energy and I have a lot of anxiety [to a point where I've been unable to stay in a public social situation for more than twenty minutes {even at school}], they said they would help me. Now my dad doesn't understand dog training at all, and is undermining my efforts by encouraging certain behaviors - IE, chase the bunny, bark at it, tug on the leash. When I told him this he either ignored me or went on a thirty-minute yelling spree.

I understand that it is possible to certify a service dog with the help of a trainer without paying thousands of dollars to have the dog trained. When I finish obedience training [no distractions on the leash, and such], I plan to meet with one.

Does anyone have any advice beyond this? How to deal with an ignorant person? How old the dog would have to be to get certified? [I'm not so worried about the training; that I can do.]



idratherbeatree
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05 Oct 2012, 11:21 pm

I just wanted to say: Be prepared for ignorance. People see a dog, and suddenly their brain turns off. Even people in wheelchairs and such with service dogs are often asked to take their dog outside, or that they can't bring it with them into places. And you'll attract unwanted attention of people wanting to pet the dog.

Otherwise I think it's fantastic that you want to train the dog yourself. I don't know much about certifications, my experience in training animals comes from horses. I hope it works out well. I wish I had a service dog myself.


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emimeni
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05 Oct 2012, 11:30 pm

idratherbeatree wrote:
I just wanted to say: Be prepared for ignorance. People see a dog, and suddenly their brain turns off. Even people in wheelchairs and such with service dogs are often asked to take their dog outside, or that they can't bring it with them into places. And you'll attract unwanted attention of people wanting to pet the dog.


But you know what? In spite of ignorance, you still have rights. You have to right to take your dog in public places. You have the right for people not to pet your dog. You know that. So does the person I quoted.

On the other hand, your dog is going to have to do something that a "normal" dog isn't expected to do. Any dogs can wear a harness on their back that carries things, and dogs are expected to calm us down when we're upset by being affectionate.

As for your dad...sorry about him. :roll: I'm not sure what else to say except I feel supportive of you.


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Kaelynn
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05 Oct 2012, 11:55 pm

My obesseion is service dogs. I trained one for myself but she is having health problems and I bought a new puppy to take her place when she can't do it anymore. Here are a few things you should know for service dog training.
1. Saying the dog "just makes me feel better when its around" is not a service dog. Thats called an Emotional Support Dog. They do not have public access rights like service dogs do.

2. For the dog to be a service dog it has to do at least 2 things to help you with your disablility. For me, my dog helps navigate through crowds with out a verbal command, she picks up things on the ground ( I have musucle problems) and she provides deep pressure on command.

3. This isn't a law but your dog should obey commands consitenly before you think about taking it in public. Commands such as sit, down, leave it, come and not to beg for food while you eat. (This is just the start of the many things service dogs must know) The only time a business owner can legally ask you and your service dog to leave is if the dog is a safty threat to others or is not in your control. Basically if the dog is dragging you around on a leash, growleing, barking or doing its business inside.

4. There is no such thing as a "certified service dog". If there was then owner trained service dogs wouldn't be legal. Right now the laws in the USA are any one with any disability can train their own service dog. Like I said the dog has to do at least 2 things to help you.

Aspergers/ Autism service dogs are very helpful and the things they can do for their humans is different and unique for each one. Some are trained to stop a bolting child from running into the street, others can stop stimming.

To be totally honest with you, I find service dog training very stressful, and the puppy I have is so hyper can crazy she makes things so much harder. But it is so worth it when you need them and they do their job and help you out! I hope this helps. If you have questions about any thing dog related feel free to ask!



phyrehawke
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06 Oct 2012, 1:15 am

I am/was trainer and I should re-up my licensing. I let it go for awhile.
I agree with Kaelynn, on most things. I've always been told to train for 3 tasks to help with. A good one is if you take medications, for the dog to alert to a timer. I have both of mine trained to eat when the timer goes off, so of course they come get me...but only if I have it set for a particular ring. They ignore the others that don't mean "food/treat!".
Assuming you are in the US, you should get a slip from your doctor stating that your service dog (in training) is part of your treatment plan, and carry it with you. That helps support you if somebody challenges your right to access with a service dog. It can also be helpful to have a service dog vest for your dog. You can buy an in-training vest (or patch for the vest) for your dog while you are training it, as well as patches that tell people the dog is working, please don't pet. That can help cut down on people bothering you. Then only the illiterate and stubborn ones will bother you, lol. *Always* keep a service dog up to date on it's vaccinations, and keep a record of that with you.

A word of warning...I think it's awesome that you are training your own dog and I don't doubt that you can do it. You sound very confident, and capable. Huskies like to work, but tend not to be blindly obedient. Some think well for themselves, which can help you out on a really bad day, but it can make them hard to train sometimes. You have to make training fun for them and be extra patient to make sure they see the point...not just doing something because you told them to. If you take the time to do this right (and he has a good temperament for service work) he'll be happy to think for you and help you out when you are overwhelmed. Also, don't ever take a service dog on escalators (like at the mall). Without special training they can get their toes caught between the moving steps.
Also beware of people who walk up and bother you when your dog is wearing a vest &/or patch that clearly states he's working, no petting, and do what everything says not to do. They've got boundary issues...probably not the kind of friendly (yet rude) you want in your life. These people are part of the reason I gave up training my dog for service work. Dogs are stranger-magnets and conversation starters, and that's so not what I needed from my SD. Just be aware of it.



LennytheWicked
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06 Oct 2012, 5:34 am

Kaelynn wrote:
My obesseion is service dogs. I trained one for myself but she is having health problems and I bought a new puppy to take her place when she can't do it anymore. Here are a few things you should know for service dog training.
1. Saying the dog "just makes me feel better when its around" is not a service dog. Thats called an Emotional Support Dog. They do not have public access rights like service dogs do.

Yes, I understand. My intention was to train him to a) alert me when I start on the anxiety, as I have very little control or comprehension [this is why I wanted to meet with an experienced dog trainer once I've gotten him on-task and obedience-trained {which he mostly is; just a few things I have to work out}] b) calm me down before I start throwing a fit [I've heard that one way they do this is by leaning; that seems like it would help] and c) carry asthma meds. That last one seems really out of place, but perfume is a huge trigger with me, and people won't stop spraying it. I've had to be carried out of restaurants, classrooms, etc... If he's going to be with me all the time he should probably have my inhaler.

Quote:
3. This isn't a law but your dog should obey commands consistently before you think about taking it in public. Commands such as sit, down, leave it, come and not to beg for food while you eat. (This is just the start of the many things service dogs must know) The only time a business owner can legally ask you and your service dog to leave is if the dog is a safety threat to others or is not in your control. Basically if the dog is dragging you around on a leash, growling, barking or doing its business inside.

Yeah, that's why I'm irritated with my dad. He doesn't growl or bark, and he's been housebroken. For the most part, he's fine on the leash, but he likes squirrels and other dogs too much, so I'm training him the same way I trained my other dogs. [Though my other dogs were aggressive, and he just wants to sniff their butts and move on.]

Quote:
4. There is no such thing as a "certified service dog". If there was then owner trained service dogs wouldn't be legal. Right now the laws in the USA are any one with any disability can train their own service dog. Like I said the dog has to do at least 2 things to help you.

I didn't realize that. I thought that some owners had an ID or slip that said the dog was trained and such. I still intend to meet with a trainer to help with a few of those things, but thank you.

Quote:
To be totally honest with you, I find service dog training very stressful, and the puppy I have is so hyper can crazy she makes things so much harder. But it is so worth it when you need them and they do their job and help you out! I hope this helps. If you have questions about any thing dog related feel free to ask!

I like training dogs. My neighbor was having trouble with their dogs, so I asked if they wanted help. It was a little harder, because my neighbors are Korean and the dogs only knew Korean vocal commands, so I had to learn a bit myself. Though I wasn't training the dogs to do anything specific; just stop pulling on the leash and dragging their person down the street.

I'm actually considering dog-training as a side-job, since I intend to be a writer and I realize that could leave a lot of limbo until I've gotten a book out there in the open.



Last edited by LennytheWicked on 06 Oct 2012, 5:45 am, edited 1 time in total.

LennytheWicked
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06 Oct 2012, 5:45 am

phyrehawke wrote:
I am/was trainer and I should re-up my licensing. I let it go for awhile.
I agree with Kaelynn, on most things. I've always been told to train for 3 tasks to help with. A good one is if you take medications, for the dog to alert to a timer. I have both of mine trained to eat when the timer goes off, so of course they come get me...but only if I have it set for a particular ring. They ignore the others that don't mean "food/treat!".
Assuming you are in the US, you should get a slip from your doctor stating that your service dog (in training) is part of your treatment plan, and carry it with you. That helps support you if somebody challenges your right to access with a service dog. It can also be helpful to have a service dog vest for your dog. You can buy an in-training vest (or patch for the vest) for your dog while you are training it, as well as patches that tell people the dog is working, please don't pet. That can help cut down on people bothering you. Then only the illiterate and stubborn ones will bother you, lol. *Always* keep a service dog up to date on it's vaccinations, and keep a record of that with you.

Thanks for the advice.

Quote:
A word of warning...I think it's awesome that you are training your own dog and I don't doubt that you can do it. You sound very confident, and capable. Huskies like to work, but tend not to be blindly obedient. Some think well for themselves, which can help you out on a really bad day, but it can make them hard to train sometimes. You have to make training fun for them and be extra patient to make sure they see the point...not just doing something because you told them to. If you take the time to do this right (and he has a good temperament for service work) he'll be happy to think for you and help you out when you are overwhelmed.

He does have good temperament; he's not aggressive, and he's already observing ground rules (like, he can't come on the couch or bed without an invitation, he can't go in my parents' bedroom, he can't be in the kitchen when people are cooking). As of today he's been with us a week.

I actually decided to train him as a service dog because the breed's got that reputation, and he fits it. Labs have a similar reputation of being stubborn but dedicated, and I've seen quite a few labs working as service dogs. I honestly think that living with Riley will be easier if he's got a job to do some of the time. [Not that it's hard, but every time someone gets home {four people} he wants a walk. One time he didn't I took him on a two-mile bike ride/sprint.]

Quote:
Also, don't ever take a service dog on escalators (like at the mall). Without special training they can get their toes caught between the moving steps.

Got it.

Quote:
Also beware of people who walk up and bother you when your dog is wearing a vest &/or patch that clearly states he's working, no petting, and do what everything says not to do. They've got boundary issues...probably not the kind of friendly (yet rude) you want in your life. These people are part of the reason I gave up training my dog for service work. Dogs are stranger-magnets and conversation starters, and that's so not what I needed from my SD. Just be aware of it.

I understand that too. I'm also prepared for people to ask what my problem is. >.> If they ask that, and they're just strangers, I'll tell them I'm epileptic, which isn't a total lie. [My seizures are too rare and minor for me to call it epilepsy. Maybe once a month and I just go, "Woah, wasn't I standing over there a minute ago? Why can't I feel my foot? Oh, there it goes."]