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ZombieBrideXD
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19 Apr 2014, 6:31 pm

today, i was hanging out with my cousins and they went to play with other kids on the reserve, and there was a kid there with autism, he was diagnosed with Classic but he didnt seem it at all.

very good verbal skills, and wanted to play with the other kids. i had some 1 on 1 time with him and he was quoting from a 2006 movie 'Monster House" almost perfectly. it was really interesting because i remember quoting movies too.

also, apparently the parents are very absent and detatched to this child.

Question: do you think certain autistic people would benifit better from less parantal help or more

NOTE: i understand some autistic people really CAN NOT do well without any support,


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babybird
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19 Apr 2014, 6:33 pm

I did ok without parental people.


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Willard
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19 Apr 2014, 7:41 pm

ZombieBrideXD wrote:
i remember quoting movies too.


I've done it incessantly all my life, like Agent Dinozo on NCIS. :roll:

The 'Lone Ranger' movie with Johnny Depp is full of amusing lines. :D

"Horse says you are Spirit Walker, returned from Great Beyond, great warrior who cannot be killed in battle. Something very wrong with that horse."

"Nature...out of balance."

"Are those my boots?"

"Kimosabe - you keep calling me that, what does that mean?" "Wrong brother."

"Make trade."

"Does that mean the horse can fly?" "Don't be stupid."

"He was gonna violate me with a duck foot!"

"What did you do that for!?" "Bird angry."

"Commanche gesture of respect - taste another man's drink."

"Hi-Yo, Sillll-ver, AwaAaAAayYy!" "Never do that again."

ZombieBrideXD wrote:
do you think certain autistic people would benifit better from less parantal help or more


I could have done with less. My parents were determined to turn me into a normal kid and it just frustrated me and made me feel guilty because I couldn't ever live up to their expectations.



kraftiekortie
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19 Apr 2014, 7:46 pm

Sometimes, parents don't understand sensory overload. It's a difficult balance. Sometimes, parents have to back away, but still be around when needed.



jayjayuk
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19 Apr 2014, 7:59 pm

My stepson is classic Autistic.

To me he appears normal. Heck, I even battled with their decision for a long time that he wasn't Autistic. He's a good kid. My god he his awesome on the piano. I'm still teaching him, but the way he picks up what I teach him is unbelievable. I said to him the other week "When you see two black notes, the note next to it on the left of the first black note is C then the white keys go C, D, E, F, G, A, B". And I showed him with an example. I told him once, and he done it straight away. I was amazed at how quick he picked it up. He's only 6. So the next morning I tested him, asked him to show me where C is, and to tell me the letters of the keys. Done it perfect. I said "Move down the piano, so me a different C". Done it right away, and I didn't even show him.

There is nowhere else he could learn that.

I treat him normal. I spend time with him on the areas where I am strong, and he is weak. Tell a lie, the areas where I am strong, he also appears strong, but I'm no good with the other subjects so I stick to teaching him music, computers and math.

He's so bright, and smart. Very loving too. We joke sometimes and I say "Jake, I'm fat" and he replies with "No, James your not fat you're beautiful". He wants to hug everyone. He's very attached to certain people. He will try to hug his friends who are male at school, but they push him away.

He makes these annoying noises constantly though, high pitched squealing, but I know that's him, and I know with AS there is no point in even trying to stop them. I'm probably just as annoying at times as he is so hey. We make a good team :D

We're on the same scale in terms of AS - and I'm not his Dad by blood - which is kinda odd.

Sorry, talking too much. He's awesome though.



ZombieBrideXD
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19 Apr 2014, 8:04 pm

Willard wrote:
ZombieBrideXD wrote:
i remember quoting movies too.


I've done it incessantly all my life, like Agent Dinozo on NCIS. :roll:

The 'Lone Ranger' movie with Johnny Depp is full of amusing lines. :D

"Horse says you are Spirit Walker, returned from Great Beyond, great warrior who cannot be killed in battle. Something very wrong with that horse."

"Nature...out of balance."

"Are those my boots?"

"Kimosabe - you keep calling me that, what does that mean?" "Wrong brother."


"Make trade."

"Does that mean the horse can fly?" "Don't be stupid."

"He was gonna violate me with a duck foot!"

"What did you do that for!?" "Bird angry."

"Commanche gesture of respect - taste another man's drink."

"Hi-Yo, Sillll-ver, AwaAaAAayYy!" "Never do that again."

ZombieBrideXD wrote:
do you think certain autistic people would benifit better from less parantal help or more


I could have done with less. My parents were determined to turn me into a normal kid and it just frustrated me and made me feel guilty because I couldn't ever live up to their expectations.


thats very good!! when i was young i would reherse Lady and The Tramp 2 like crazy. same with Lilo and stitch and later years Coraline

" huh, a little me? thats weird"

" Youre not my mother! my mother doesnt have... b-bu..." "bu-bu-bu-buttons?"

i cant remember any quotes exactly, but i did watch the movie over 100 times (i counted) but its been a while


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Obsessing over Sonic the Hedgehog since 2009
Diagnosed with Aspergers' syndrome in 2012.
Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder Level 1 severity without intellectual disability and without language impairment in 2015.

DA: http://mephilesdark123.deviantart.com

Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 170 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 43 of 200
You are very likely neurodiverse (Aspie)


Raptor
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19 Apr 2014, 8:21 pm

My parents were more of a hindrance than any help.


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BeggingTurtle
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19 Apr 2014, 8:22 pm

Willard wrote:
I could have done with less. My parents were determined to turn me into a normal kid and it just frustrated me and made me feel guilty because I couldn't ever live up to their expectations.


These are my parents. They say it's not true, but deep down, this is what they want. My brother and sister are like this, and they want me to be like that too.


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TheDoctor82
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19 Apr 2014, 10:31 pm

if there's one thing I've learned from over 30 years of life, it's that folks generally seem to keep us at arms' length; this typically includes family as well.

as for my parents, my Mom was Autistic, and my Dad...isn't, but he definitely has something heading in that direction; my Mom was always in her own little world, and my Dad was usually more focused on his critical thinking studies.

And then, when we are given advice, it's usually from people showing flat-out they have no basic understanding of the person they're even talking to.

I would love to see what would happen if parents actually nurtured their Autistic child and encouraged him/her, and showed they honestly basically gave a $#!+



CockneyRebel
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19 Apr 2014, 10:54 pm

Quote:
I would love to see what would happen if parents actually nurtured their Autistic child and encouraged him/her, and showed they honestly basically gave a $#!+


I bet that child could go a very long way in life if they got the encouragement and support that they were craving. I wasn't given any of those things, and I drop off gathered cans and bottles at the recycling depot every day. I'm not feeling sorry for myself and I actually do enjoy the exercise required to find the quantity of containers that I do. There are just some days that I wonder how far I would have gone in my own life if I got the nurturing and encouragement needed to venture out into the real world and find work for myself.


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TheDoctor82
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19 Apr 2014, 11:06 pm

CockneyRebel wrote:
Quote:
I would love to see what would happen if parents actually nurtured their Autistic child and encouraged him/her, and showed they honestly basically gave a $#!+


I bet that child could go a very long way in life if they got the encouragement and support that they were craving. I wasn't given any of those things, and I drop off gathered cans and bottles at the recycling depot every day. I'm not feeling sorry for myself and I actually do enjoy the exercise required to find the quantity of containers that I do. There are just some days that I wonder how far I would have gone in my own life if I got the nurturing and encouragement needed to venture out into the real world and find work for myself.


I think if I'd been given the proper support, I'd be a helluva lot farther in life, but on the plus side, I'm told that I'm very strong-willed, and despite all I've been hit with, I still fight on, never give up, and I'm definitely making head-way!

One thing I essentially tell people is "you got lucky with me; pretty much everyone did almost everything wrong. There is no conceivable rhyme or reason to how I turned out as well as I did; it kinda just came down to me deciding whether I wanted to take the chance at bettering myself with what little was in my favor, or blow it and definitely be screwed for life. The thing is...don't ever assume lightning is gonna strike twice; just because you got lucky with me does not guarantee you'll get that with all other Autistic people, and on top of that, as even Rumpelstiltskin says "all magic comes with a price", and there was a massive price to be paid with me...I just don't trust almost anyone to do right by me, anymore."



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20 Apr 2014, 8:34 pm

jayjayuk wrote:
My stepson is classic Autistic.

To me he appears normal. Heck, I even battled with their decision for a long time that he wasn't Autistic. He's a good kid. My god he his awesome on the piano. I'm still teaching him, but the way he picks up what I teach him is unbelievable. I said to him the other week "When you see two black notes, the note next to it on the left of the first black note is C then the white keys go C, D, E, F, G, A, B". And I showed him with an example. I told him once, and he done it straight away. I was amazed at how quick he picked it up. He's only 6. So the next morning I tested him, asked him to show me where C is, and to tell me the letters of the keys. Done it perfect. I said "Move down the piano, so me a different C". Done it right away, and I didn't even show him.

There is nowhere else he could learn that.

I treat him normal. I spend time with him on the areas where I am strong, and he is weak. Tell a lie, the areas where I am strong, he also appears strong, but I'm no good with the other subjects so I stick to teaching him music, computers and math.

He's so bright, and smart. Very loving too. We joke sometimes and I say "Jake, I'm fat" and he replies with "No, James your not fat you're beautiful". He wants to hug everyone. He's very attached to certain people. He will try to hug his friends who are male at school, but they push him away.

He makes these annoying noises constantly though, high pitched squealing, but I know that's him, and I know with AS there is no point in even trying to stop them. I'm probably just as annoying at times as he is so hey. We make a good team :D

We're on the same scale in terms of AS - and I'm not his Dad by blood - which is kinda odd.

Sorry, talking too much. He's awesome though.
That is beautiful. You are both so lucky and so blessed to have each other.


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