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Have you explored/researched the broad autism phenotype thoroughly?
Yes 43%  43%  [ 10 ]
No 57%  57%  [ 13 ]
Total votes : 23

btbnnyr
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18 Dec 2014, 12:43 am

I am wondering if anyone seems to have inherited all the different autistic traits of both parents, as I seem to have inherited.
The individual autistic traits seem to have gotten stronger from them to me too.
Then, there was the language development delay that neither of them had, that was mine, all mine, my precious.


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B19
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18 Dec 2014, 12:55 am

You can probably count me in on that one.



kraftiekortie
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18 Dec 2014, 10:08 am

I'm a purely idiopathic autistic person.



Norny
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18 Dec 2014, 11:19 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
I'm a purely idiopathic autistic person.


Would you have considered yourself LFA when you were young? If so that seems consistent with what btbnnyr posted about the genetic traits typically leading into a child with HFA.

My friend was LFA when he was young, and his parents do not have many autistic features. He has deemed his mum 'slightly cold' but that's all.

In my family there have been sensory sensitivities, though not to the extent of hyper or hyposensitivity. There are visual/spatial deficits, related disorders (OCD, potentially ADHD, anxiety etc.). I wonder if it would be more likely down the track for my family to have a child with LFA or HFA. Impossible for me to figure out. :wink:


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kraftiekortie
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18 Dec 2014, 11:41 am

I would have probably been considered LFA until about age 5.

Temple Grandin seemed LFA when she was very young.

You should read a book called "Elijah's Cup." It details the transition from LFA to Asperger's in a child named Elijah. I actually met the mother.



AspieUtah
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18 Dec 2014, 11:44 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
...You should read a book called "Elijah's Cup." It details the transition from LFA to Asperger's in a child named Elijah. I actually met the mother.

Hm, that was a vague reference. :D

Was the mother your mother, and were you Elijah?


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kraftiekortie
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18 Dec 2014, 11:50 am

Nope...this kid is about 25 now. He's apparently working as a waiter in a Upstate New York town.

I met the mother at an autism function in my alma-mater.

It wasn't a bestseller--but it sold fairly well.



Adamantium
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18 Dec 2014, 11:59 am

btbnnyr wrote:
As we learn more about different causes of autism, I think that autism will narrow rather than broaden, such that disorders like Rett go off autism spectrum (already happened), then Fragile X autism-like symptoms currently diagnosed as autism being distinct from non-Fragile X autism (past few years research trending this way), then same for other genetic disorders, perhaps same idea for environmentally-induced symptomps, etc etc etc, until what is autism is caused by combinations of common genetic variants causing similar traits in general population. There will also be improvements distinguishing autism from intellectual disability and autism from neurotypical, so boundaries of autism will change at low-functioning and high-functioning ends. I think the broadening phase was the DSM-IV, and near future is refining/distinguishing phase.


This is consistent with the sense that I got from my reading on autism. It seems to me likely that in addition to a variety of specific etiologies resulting in distinct diagnoses there is a chance that something like the Aspergers group may re-emerge at the high functioning end. It seems unlikely to me that the label for people at the high functioning end that shades into BAP will be called "neurotypical."

It seems to me that the concept of neurotypical may expand with the recognition of the diversity of "normal" variation, but the impairments people have at the high end are real and require a structure for treatmet/services and this will necessitate some kind of labeling.



coschristi
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18 Dec 2014, 1:07 pm

at some point i think that reliance on the term "spectrum" will prove to be to non-definitive for diagnostic use. there are many conditions/events that display wide ranges of severity but require varied "gradings" in order to be understood in proper context. for example:
1. if the media reported that "a community has been devestated by a storm on the tornado spectrum", that information would be useless! instead they report that "a community has been devestated by an F4 or F5 tornado"
2. if a nurse was instructed by a doctor to provide care for "the patient in room 5 with a "burn spectrum injury" how would she/he know what dressings or treatments to prepare? the care required for a 1st degree burn is much different than for a 3rd degree burn!

other examples include "stage 4 cancer" or "5 alarm fire"..

although there IS a broad spectrum of autistic symptoms, reliance on the word "spectrum" is misleading; if anything, it would be more accurate to at least use the Bell Curve!


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btbnnyr
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18 Dec 2014, 2:52 pm

Regarding the bloomer population that presents with severe autistic traits in childhood, but the traits moderate into HFA by teenage years, I consider these children always HFA, because they lacked intellectual disability all along, but only had severe autistic traits, while LFA children had both severe autistic traits and intellectual disability. Cognitive ability is most key to childhood development and adult presentation, there is no other factor that comes close to its importance.

In most cases I have heard of and my own, blooming occurs with fast language acquisition that allows functional communication, followed by social behaviors appearing to catch up to those who had milder autistic traits in childhood, but the social cognition didn't catch up in my case, esp. implicit social cognition, the fast automatic responses that people are not aware of themselves making and can't describe as eggsplicit thought processes.


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btbnnyr
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18 Dec 2014, 3:36 pm

Another interesting thing about "complex autism" is that the autistic-like traits are likely from identifiable morphological brain anomalies not caused by genetics but something going highly off-course during embryonic/fetal development, similar to other organs or limbs not developing normally, but not genetically programmed to do so like six fingers. This is likely to be quite distinct from autism caused by combinations of many inherited alleles.


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B19
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18 Dec 2014, 3:51 pm

Yes, that distinction has lacked much serious attention (or any thoughtful attention basically).



kraftiekortie
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18 Dec 2014, 7:12 pm

Epigenetics.....

BTTBNNYR: Have you encountered many "bloomers" in your work. I think I'm quite possibly one of those "bloomers." When I did start to speak at age 5 1/2, I underwent rapid progress. Apparently, I was speaking like "all kids my age" within months. However, I was Aspergian socially all through my childhood.

I went from being totally dependent right before I turned 5, to being able to go out, get soda and potato chips, and get the correct change by about age 5 3/4. Soon afterwards, my father entrusted me with getting the newspaper every Sunday. I got 25 cents a week allowance when I was six years old. Age six was also when I learned how to cross the street properly.



btbnnyr
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18 Dec 2014, 7:46 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Epigenetics.....

BTTBNNYR: Have you encountered many "bloomers" in your work. I think I'm quite possibly one of those "bloomers." When I did start to speak at age 5 1/2, I underwent rapid progress. Apparently, I was speaking like "all kids my age" within months. However, I was Aspergian socially all through my childhood.

I went from being totally dependent right before I turned 5, to being able to go out, get soda and potato chips, and get the correct change by about age 5 3/4. Soon afterwards, my father entrusted me with getting the newspaper every Sunday. I got 25 cents a week allowance when I was six years old. Age six was also when I learned how to cross the street properly.


I am not sure if I have met any, as I did not ask most people the details of their childhoods. I know that one of my research participants had severe autistic traits in childhood, and since he is verbally fluent and high-functioning as a young adult, I think that he was possibly a bloomer, but I don't know about the age.

I bloomed from ages 8 to 10. And it seems like Norny's friend did in a similar range too. But I was always quite high-functioning non-socially in terms of independence, motor skills, and EF.


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kraftiekortie
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18 Dec 2014, 7:51 pm

I was very low-functioning until I started to speak--in all modalities. I couldn't dress myself. I was awkward physically. I was toilet-trained at age 2 1/2, though. I learned to dress myself and to tie my shoelaces at age 6. I also learned to write at age 6. I learned to dress myself primarily because I didn't like the feeling of my mother dressing me