The Relief of Diagnosis: Autism Spectrum Diagnosis in Adults

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AspieUtah
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01 Apr 2015, 9:12 pm

AutismDigest.com wrote:
At a recent forum for professionals who provide services to special needs populations, my friend, Jack approached a representative from our regional single portal entity. He asked what the process would be for an adult male, in his early 40s, who’d recently been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, if that person were to apply for services.

“Well, that would never happen,” the representative said. “Autism is always diagnosed in childhood.”

“Just say that it did …” my friend tried again, “just hypothetically.”

The man shrugged. “It wouldn’t.”

“But, “ Jack stammered. “But …” His face got red and hot, his palms rubbing against the denim of his jeans. “But …” He didn’t hear what else was said, as he fled the room, unable to say what he was thinking: “But I’m autistic. And I just got diagnosed a month ago....”

AutismDigest.com: "The Relief of Diagnosis: Autism Spectrum Diagnosis in Adults" (February/April 2015)
http://www.autismdigest.com/the-relief- ... -in-adults


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Adamantium
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02 Apr 2015, 11:09 am

AspieUtah wrote:
AutismDigest.com wrote:
At a recent forum for professionals who provide services to special needs populations, my friend, Jack approached a representative from our regional single portal entity. He asked what the process would be for an adult male, in his early 40s, who’d recently been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, if that person were to apply for services.

“Well, that would never happen,” the representative said. “Autism is always diagnosed in childhood.”

“Just say that it did …” my friend tried again, “just hypothetically.”

The man shrugged. “It wouldn’t.”

“But, “ Jack stammered. “But …” His face got red and hot, his palms rubbing against the denim of his jeans. “But …” He didn’t hear what else was said, as he fled the room, unable to say what he was thinking: “But I’m autistic. And I just got diagnosed a month ago....”

AutismDigest.com: "The Relief of Diagnosis: Autism Spectrum Diagnosis in Adults" (February/April 2015)
http://www.autismdigest.com/the-relief- ... -in-adults


Interesting piece, thanks for the link.
I thought this was an odd choice of words:
"Te percentage of adults with ASD appears to be consistent to that of children with ASD, upholding the understanding that ASD is a lifelong learning style."
I haven't thought of it as a "learning style" before. It seems funny in the context of a story at least partly about people whose professional experience gives them a narrow perspective on the definition of autism.

The recommendations are good



AspieUtah
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02 Apr 2015, 11:29 am

Adamantium wrote:
...I thought this was an odd choice of words:

"The percentage of adults with ASD appears to be consistent to that of children with ASD, upholding the understanding that ASD is a lifelong learning style."

I haven't thought of it as a "learning style" before. It seems funny in the context of a story at least partly about people whose professional experience gives them a narrow perspective on the definition of autism....

Yeah, the phrase does seem to imply a desire for individuals with ASDs to adapt with the use of coping skills. While that desire is shared by many with ASDs, I recognize that, in this case, it appears almost expected. Maybe it was entirely unintentional by the writer. Or am I wrong?


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Adamantium
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02 Apr 2015, 12:49 pm

AspieUtah wrote:
Adamantium wrote:
...I thought this was an odd choice of words:

"The percentage of adults with ASD appears to be consistent to that of children with ASD, upholding the understanding that ASD is a lifelong learning style."

I haven't thought of it as a "learning style" before. It seems funny in the context of a story at least partly about people whose professional experience gives them a narrow perspective on the definition of autism....

Yeah, the phrase does seem to imply a desire for individuals with ASDs to adapt with the use of coping skills. While that desire is shared by many with ASDs, I recognize that, in this case, it appears almost expected. Maybe it was entirely unintentional by the writer. Or am I wrong?


My guess is it was unintentional and maybe just a habit from speaking about autism mostly in an academic context.

I can't imagine anyone who doesn't want to adapt with the use of coping skills unless they are deeply depressed--but "neurological difference" still would make more sense to me than "learning style." But it's a truly inconsequential point. Just something about the phrase was unexpected.



ASPartOfMe
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02 Apr 2015, 1:42 pm

"learning style" while accurate leaves out such things sensory and different ways of communicating.
But the idea about the lack of knowledge of adult and female autism is discussed in one form or another pretty much every day on WP.


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AspieUtah
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02 Apr 2015, 1:53 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
"learning style" while accurate leaves out such things sensory and different ways of communicating.
But the idea about the lack of knowledge of adult and female autism is discussed in one form or another pretty much every day on WP.

Very true; there are pockets of great discussion about the matter while others ignore it. Among the many individuals and groups who appear to ignore adults with ASDs, I wonder if the reason that Autism $peaks doesn't include adults with ASDs in its advertising is because it might have tried once or twice, but the adults refused to "act" forlorn and pathetic enough. Hehe. But, don't go by me; my mind wanders sometimes. :lol:


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Adamantium
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02 Apr 2015, 7:51 pm

I guess another thing with "learning style" that was bothering me but I somehow couldn't quite describe at the time is this:
There are all different kinds of autistic people. Verbal/nonverbal. Visual/no so visual. Etc.., etc.

Surely this implies that autistic people have multiple learning styles?

Maybe I don't understand what they mean by learning style.



AspieUtah
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02 Apr 2015, 9:26 pm

Adamantium wrote:
I guess another thing with "learning style" that was bothering me but I somehow couldn't quite describe at the time is this:
There are all different kinds of autistic people. Verbal/nonverbal. Visual/no so visual. Etc.., etc.

Surely this implies that autistic people have multiple learning styles?

Maybe I don't understand what they mean by learning style.

Me, too. I believe it meant "ability to adapt," but I amn't sure. Maybe the writer's accurate phrase was substituted by an editor who tried to improve the original phrase. :?


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03 Apr 2015, 8:18 am

Nice article----thanks, for posting it, AU!

I sorta liked the term "learning style"----it seems less "offensive" than "learning disabled", because I can learn----I just have a different way of going-about it. (I said "sorta" because the phrase is so new to me, that it hasn't quite sunk-in, yet.) Maybe the reason that it bothers you, Adamantium, is because "style" seems to suggest that one CHOOSES "it"----like, style of clothing, or room decor? I'm thinking most of us don't feel like we have ANY "say" in the matter, what-so-ever (meaning it's most definitely NOT "a choice").







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Adamantium
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03 Apr 2015, 9:12 am

Campin_Cat wrote:
Maybe the reason that it bothers you, Adamantium, is because "style" seems to suggest that one CHOOSES "it"----like, style of clothing, or room decor? I'm thinking most of us don't feel like we have ANY "say" in the matter, what-so-ever (meaning it's most definitely NOT "a choice").

No, it's not that, because my idea of learning style was: auditory learning style, visual learning style, textual learning style, kinesthetic learning style. I don't think people choose those either.

My sense of autism is of a really broad category that would normally contain all the learning styles because of the diversity of autistic people--so it just felt like a mismatch, like saying "autism is an eye color" or "autism is a way of walking."



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28 May 2015, 2:54 pm

I have actually been thinking about posting something roughly along the lines that a core feature of autism is an atypical learning style, but by "learning style" I mean something more fundamental than the visual/auditory/kinesthetic learning styles. I would propose that the autistic learning style is self-referential, meaning that learning occurs most easily and naturally via self-instruction, internal motivation, and building relationships between new material and personal experience.

I came up with this idea by taking together the following autistic traits:

disinclination to imitate and difficulty imitating (everything from peek-a-boo to prosody)

excellent learning of personal interests combined with sometimes poor learning of imposed subjects (such as school curriculum over which there is no choice); large, unexplainable gaps in ability levels

ideasthesia and synesthesia

and perhaps one or two others that I cannot remember at the moment.


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01 Jun 2015, 11:15 am

You know who else doesn't seem to want to hear from adult autistics? Young autistics.

I can't relate specifics here, but it's becoming clear to me that young people who "identify" as being on the autism spectrum often are not open to hearing from adults (30s and over) who are also on the autism spectrum but have had different paths and have different perspectives. Often the perspective they don't want to hear is encouraging and positive. A lot of young people want to hear about what's wrong and how disadvantaged they are, not what strengths they have and what good they can do.



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01 Jun 2015, 11:22 am

SocOfAutism wrote:
A lot of young people want to hear about what's wrong and how disadvantaged they are, not what strengths they have and what good they can do.

Seems like a sweeping assumption. I hear everything I can't do every day from my mother.... :| I definitely don't want to hear it here.



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01 Jun 2015, 12:13 pm

starkid wrote:
I have actually been thinking about posting something roughly along the lines that a core feature of autism is an atypical learning style, but by "learning style" I mean something more fundamental than the visual/auditory/kinesthetic learning styles. I would propose that the autistic learning style is self-referential, meaning that learning occurs most easily and naturally via self-instruction, internal motivation, and building relationships between new material and personal experience.

I came up with this idea by taking together the following autistic traits:

disinclination to imitate and difficulty imitating (everything from peek-a-boo to prosody)

excellent learning of personal interests combined with sometimes poor learning of imposed subjects (such as school curriculum over which there is no choice); large, unexplainable gaps in ability levels

ideasthesia and synesthesia

and perhaps one or two others that I cannot remember at the moment.
Yes, I think you might be on to something. I tend to learn best alone.

In fact, I think this might be a big reason I belatedly developed my method of pre-study, like when I went back to college the third or fourth time!



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01 Jun 2015, 7:05 pm

Quote:

The autism community can be a good source of information for learning more about ASD. They may be able to provide information regarding services available to adults with diagnosed ASD, or their experiences with disclosure, self-advocacy, or their own diagnostic journey. In particular, organizations such as the Autism Self-Advocacy Network (ASAN) or The Global & Regional Asperger’s Syndrome Partnership (GRASP) may offer social and support opportunities. Groups may publicize their meetings through popular online forums such as meetup.com or Facebook. Online forums, such as wrongplanet.net, are also popular venues for adults with ASD and those considering the diagnosis, particularly those who aren’t quite ready to be public about their journey.

http://autismdigest.com/the-relief-of-d ... in-adults/

I am a member of ASAN, although inactive. I don't think I've heard of GRASP before.

And this is the way I hope spectrum networking develops, through a quiltwork of different organizations.