Before You Look for Work Here Are Four Things You Should Absolutely Know

Page 1 of 2 [ 22 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

John Marble
Emu Egg
Emu Egg

Joined: 28 Jun 2017
Age: 39
Gender: Male
Posts: 1
Location: San Francisco, CA

28 Jun 2017, 3:10 pm


Our team used to hate conversations like the one below. We really did.

“That’s really incredible,” said a well-meaning educator who had called in April about our Autism Advantage program, which runs six-week training cohorts for autistic individuals around specific talent sets. “I’m searching for a program which can teach autistic people acceptable behavior for the workplace. Yours is like that, correct?”

We now love conversations like these. They give us an opportunity to explain what we’ve helped dozens of leading companies understand. Our Autism Advantage program doesn’t make autistic people ‘acceptable’. We bring out and strengthen their talents to improve their ...



Copelandia
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

Joined: 8 May 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 68

29 Jun 2017, 12:50 pm

thanks <3



Higurashi
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 37
Location: Ontario, CA

30 Jun 2017, 2:27 pm

Thanks so much for this! You're a big help :D



Lintar
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 22 Nov 2012
Age: 49
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,335
Location: Victoria, Australia

08 Jul 2017, 9:27 pm

Unfortunately, most of us don't live in 'Silicon Valley', and therefore can't take advantage of this. Also, this article is full of lazy generalisations about people who have autism/A.S. (ex. yet again we are informed that we generally prefer, and thrive in, high-tech careers/occupations/environments, when in fact there are those of us who are pretty clueless when it comes to how computers work - like me).

Never mind, it's a good start to something that needs to be done, and hopefully programmes like this will catch on globally.



the_phoenix
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,220
Location: up from the ashes

09 Jul 2017, 12:12 am

Here's what I've observed about going on job interviews.
There's a very important question that determines
where you are in the social structure
according to how you answer:
"Would you like some coffee?"

Here's the answers and how they rate on the NT point system:

1) Yes, thanks, with cream and sugar.
NT meaning: You're normal and a pleasant person to work with. 5 points.

2) Black, please.
NT meaning: You're high energy, still within the normal range. 5 points.

3) Decaf, please.
NT meaning: Hmmm, has issues with real caffeine. 4 points.

4) No thanks, I prefer tea.
NT meaning: Has to be different, must be high-maintenance (unless you're in the UK). 3 points in the USA, 5 points for normalcy in the UK.

5) No thanks, I prefer water.
NT meaning: Ah, a health nut. Maybe even a Millennial. 2 points, unless the company is modern, at which point you can still earn 5 points.

6) No thanks, I'm not thirsty.
NT meaning: Anti-social, rejects an offer of hospitality, not a team player. 0 points.

Seriously, I've been to interviews and this actually matters.



SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,030
Location: UK

09 Jul 2017, 6:37 am

the_phoenix wrote:
Here's what I've observed about going on job interviews.
There's a very important question that determines
where you are in the social structure
according to how you answer:
"Would you like some coffee?"

Here's the answers and how they rate on the NT point system:

1) Yes, thanks, with cream and sugar.
NT meaning: You're normal and a pleasant person to work with. 5 points.

2) Black, please.
NT meaning: You're high energy, still within the normal range. 5 points.

3) Decaf, please.
NT meaning: Hmmm, has issues with real caffeine. 4 points.

4) No thanks, I prefer tea.
NT meaning: Has to be different, must be high-maintenance (unless you're in the UK). 3 points in the USA, 5 points for normalcy in the UK.

5) No thanks, I prefer water.
NT meaning: Ah, a health nut. Maybe even a Millennial. 2 points, unless the company is modern, at which point you can still earn 5 points.

6) No thanks, I'm not thirsty.
NT meaning: Anti-social, rejects an offer of hospitality, not a team player. 0 points.

Seriously, I've been to interviews and this actually matters.


This just seems alien to me , I have a hard time grasping that this happens.

I've never had a job interview in America so it might be a culture thing. I would definitely decline a drink due to perceiving it as politeness and trying to act professional in an interview. I think bringing a drink into the mix makes the interview less formal.
I don't think I have ever been to a formal interview where the interviewer had a drink ( maybe a decanter of water and glasses on the desk for emergency ). Then again I've never had a job interview for a big company ( I've worked for big companies but usually fallen into the job with no interview at all )


_________________
Ha ha, I'm sorry, I went to Mars for a second, but I'm back now and I've got T-shirts for everybody


the_phoenix
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 30 Jan 2008
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,220
Location: up from the ashes

09 Jul 2017, 9:48 am

SaveFerris wrote:
This just seems alien to me , I have a hard time grasping that this happens.

I've never had a job interview in America so it might be a culture thing. I would definitely decline a drink due to perceiving it as politeness and trying to act professional in an interview. I think bringing a drink into the mix makes the interview less formal.
I don't think I have ever been to a formal interview where the interviewer had a drink ( maybe a decanter of water and glasses on the desk for emergency ). Then again I've never had a job interview for a big company ( I've worked for big companies but usually fallen into the job with no interview at all )


Maybe it is American culture ... I was just assuming that people in the UK would automatically ask if you wanted tea at a job interview.

I used to think like you that declining a drink was the polite thing to do ... But have since learned how important the offering and accepting of hospitality is to bonding ... it's about respecting and acknowledging the host's good manners, and being agreeable to fulfill your role as a guest willing to play your part in the social dance and accept someone else's generosity. If you refuse the coffee, you're rejecting the host. Yes, it sounds silly, but apparently that's how NTs operate.

And on the other hand, there was one job interview I attended where they didn't offer me anything to drink at all. I was very thirsty so I politely asked for water. Got the job, but it didn't last long. Lesson learned there: If an American company does not offer you a drink during an interview, watch out because that company is likely not doing well financially, and you will soon be looking for a new job.

As for you landing jobs without having to go through the torture of an interview? Lucky you! :)



SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,030
Location: UK

09 Jul 2017, 11:00 am

the_phoenix wrote:

Maybe it is American culture ... I was just assuming that people in the UK would automatically ask if you wanted tea at a job interview.

I'm only going on my experiences , so it could even be the type of job or the importance of the job that makes a difference :roll:

the_phoenix wrote:
I used to think like you that declining a drink was the polite thing to do ... But have since learned how important the offering and accepting of hospitality is to bonding ... it's about respecting and acknowledging the host's good manners, and being agreeable to fulfill your role as a guest willing to play your part in the social dance and accept someone else's generosity. If you refuse the coffee, you're rejecting the host. Yes, it sounds silly, but apparently that's how NTs operate.


It does sound like cultural difference , a bit like in Japan if as a guest you eat all the food put in front of you it's a sign that you were not given enough food ( I learnt that from a bank advert so don't even know if its true )

the_phoenix wrote:
And on the other hand, there was one job interview I attended where they didn't offer me anything to drink at all. I was very thirsty so I politely asked for water. Got the job, but it didn't last long. Lesson learned there: If an American company does not offer you a drink during an interview, watch out because that company is likely not doing well financially, and you will soon be looking for a new job.


I'll bare that in mind if I ever interview for an American company ( very unlikely to happen though)

the_phoenix wrote:
As for you landing jobs without having to go through the torture of an interview? Lucky you! :)

I know , I've had more jobs than successful interviews - I just wish I was able to hang on to them :lol:


_________________
Ha ha, I'm sorry, I went to Mars for a second, but I'm back now and I've got T-shirts for everybody


magnum233
Pileated woodpecker
Pileated woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 27 Jun 2015
Age: 37
Gender: Male
Posts: 189
Location: New Zealand

11 Jul 2017, 1:37 pm

Hi John, very good idea i truly hope it catch's on globally. More support is needed for autism, ive a friend in a wheel chair who gets more respect. My own experiences have taught me generally people in society still frown upon autism. Im of the belief that our brains are physically wired differently, it is a disability of sorts but one in that we think very differently about problems and life which can be quite an advantage at times. Ive often said to friends 'If the worlds transport networks were run by people with autism they would run like clockwork and almost never break down'.



avlien
Butterfly
Butterfly

Joined: 22 Oct 2015
Age: 37
Posts: 14
Location: Asheville, NC USA

09 Aug 2017, 12:58 pm

First, bravo for educating employers! I have lost several jobs that I was amazing at simply because of the social disconnects that happen between NTs & myself.

There are a few things about the job search/interview/employment process that are brick walls to someone with ASD. Actually, almost everything about job interview is since there is almost an artform to "reading" candidates based on interview responses & I for one will botch these in the worst possible way unless I am specifically prepared for the particular question/interaction. One of the commenters mentioned being offered coffee, this is the sort of thimg I mean.

Another is work history. Those of us who have been employed may have a number of shortlived jobs (for whatever reason). These do not read well on a resumé. Worse yet, having gaps in employment will almost always be interpreted as the applicant being borderline unemployable.

The biggest issue, in my opinion, is disclosure. Do I disclose? If so, when? Even if I know when I should, HOW should I disclose? What if I am undiagnosed?

These are the things that people on the spectrum need to know. It seems like this article is less a source of actionable information & more you patting yourself on the back for "helping people". Don't get me wrong, it's great that you are helping, but many of us are not in Palo Alto.


_________________
"Hello, friends. I am a perfectly normal human worm-baby! You have...absolutely nothing, to fear from me."
Invader Zim - [S01Ep01 - "The Nightmare Begins"]
_____________________________________________________
note: for the purpose of this conversation "human" = "neurotypical"


B19
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jan 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,863
Location: New Zealand

09 Aug 2017, 2:40 pm

Spammer OP has been here many many times under multiple usernames with the same pitch.



Meistersinger
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 10 May 2012
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,103
Location: Beautiful(?) York Township PA

09 Aug 2017, 3:39 pm

the_phoenix wrote:
Here's what I've observed about going on job interviews.
There's a very important question that determines
where you are in the social structure
according to how you answer:
"Would you like some coffee?"

Here's the answers and how they rate on the NT point system:

1) Yes, thanks, with cream and sugar.
NT meaning: You're normal and a pleasant person to work with. 5 points.

2) Black, please.
NT meaning: You're high energy, still within the normal range. 5 points.

3) Decaf, please.
NT meaning: Hmmm, has issues with real caffeine. 4 points.

4) No thanks, I prefer tea.
NT meaning: Has to be different, must be high-maintenance (unless you're in the UK). 3 points in the USA, 5 points for normalcy in the UK.

5) No thanks, I prefer water.
NT meaning: Ah, a health nut. Maybe even a Millennial. 2 points, unless the company is modern, at which point you can still earn 5 points.

6) No thanks, I'm not thirsty.
NT meaning: Anti-social, rejects an offer of hospitality, not a team player. 0 points.

Seriously, I've been to interviews and this actually matters.



Since when did these behaviors for interviewing for a job become de facto. All my working years, I was taught not to eat or drink anything during the interview, dress in business suits, don't come to an interview smelling like a brothel, be early for the appointment, research the prospective employer, etc. You mean to tell me that for the 35 years I've been working, everything I was taught is WRONG?


_________________
I'm back, for the time being. Any one who even attempts to rip me a new rear end because of my opinions will find themselves reported to administration. Anyone on my Foes list that replies to my posts will automatically be reported for harassment. You have been warned.


BirdInFlight
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jun 2013
Age: 55
Gender: Female
Posts: 4,318
Location: If not here, then where?

09 Aug 2017, 4:40 pm

I recently read some online article which advised NOT to accept the offer of a tea or coffee, because the interviewer is only being polite and you're supposed to decline anything that will waste time or create a longer process in the interview. The article I read said the interviewer actually doesn't want you to say yes and make them have to make or get the coffee, as it's seen as an imposition instead of you being someone who knows when something is just a politeness.



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 36,838
Location: Queens, NYC

09 Aug 2017, 6:08 pm

I've never been offered any sort of anything on a job interview. Only the chair to sit on LOL



B19
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jan 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,863
Location: New Zealand

09 Aug 2017, 6:13 pm

BirdInFlight wrote:
I recently read some online article which advised NOT to accept the offer of a tea or coffee, because the interviewer is only being polite and you're supposed to decline anything that will waste time or create a longer process in the interview. The article I read said the interviewer actually doesn't want you to say yes and make them have to make or get the coffee, as it's seen as an imposition instead of you being someone who knows when something is just a politeness.



I suggest people should always decline, because an interview isn't regarded by employers as a social occasion, and if you say yes, you risk being evaluated negatively (more interested in socialising than getting on with the job at hand).