Page 2 of 4 [ 52 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4  Next

AspieUtah
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Age: 55
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,472
Location: Millcreek, Utah

03 Oct 2017, 4:42 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
...I liked that there are autismphobe characters because that is realistic.

Yes, it is, but I was criticizing the choice of actors as antagonists. Adding in even one attending physician who looked, say, 45 years of age would make it seem less, ummm ... cheap?


_________________
Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)


ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 60
Gender: Male
Posts: 12,941
Location: Long Island, New York

04 Oct 2017, 2:00 am

‘Good Doctor’ Scores Full-Season Order at ABC

Quote:
The show has proven to be one of the more popular new series this season already, with the series premiere nabbing a healthy 2.2 rating in adults 18-49 and 11.2 million viewers according to Nielsen Live+Same Day data. The second episode of the series aired Monday night, also netting a 2.2 and 10.9 million viewers


I wonder why autistic savants/socially ackward geniuses are consistently so popular on TV and the movies


_________________
How can Autism be trendy and a popular insult at the same time?

Recovering from tongue cancer and suspected Ramsey Hunt Syndrome (Ear Shingles), somewhat verbal.
Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity


AspieUtah
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Age: 55
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,472
Location: Millcreek, Utah

04 Oct 2017, 7:05 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
‘Good Doctor’ Scores Full-Season Order at ABC

Quote:
The show has proven to be one of the more popular new series this season already, with the series premiere nabbing a healthy 2.2 rating in adults 18-49 and 11.2 million viewers according to Nielsen Live+Same Day data. The second episode of the series aired Monday night, also netting a 2.2 and 10.9 million viewers

I wonder why autistic savants/socially ackward geniuses are consistently so popular on TV and the movies

Because script writers can ascribe any kind of super failures or super talents they believe would tantalize their audiences; in other words, it is the 21st century's version of a carnival. Apart from Darold Treffert, M.D., no one really understands savant syndrome. It can be whatever others wish it to be.


_________________
Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)


Grammar Geek
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 22 Oct 2015
Age: 21
Posts: 753
Location: Missouri

04 Oct 2017, 8:08 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
‘Good Doctor’ Scores Full-Season Order at ABC

Quote:
The show has proven to be one of the more popular new series this season already, with the series premiere nabbing a healthy 2.2 rating in adults 18-49 and 11.2 million viewers according to Nielsen Live+Same Day data. The second episode of the series aired Monday night, also netting a 2.2 and 10.9 million viewers


I wonder why autistic savants/socially ackward geniuses are consistently so popular on TV and the movies


I wrote an article about autism’s growing representation in the media for my school’s magazine that touched on this:

“The fact that so many autistics in the media are given these [savant skills] seems like a way for people to make a realistic show but give a character a type of “superpower” that can make audiences ooh and ahh while at the same time provide the writers an easy way to solve problems. Does something seemingly impossible need to be accomplished? Autistic character to the rescue! It’s becoming a trope, and I’d like to see more realistic characterizations of autism.”



Scotia
Butterfly
Butterfly

User avatar

Joined: 2 Apr 2015
Gender: Female
Posts: 12

04 Oct 2017, 10:45 am

I really liked this second episode. He learns really fast, there's humor, there's drama but never too exaggerated. It's quite realistic about how someone can be ostracized because of his difference ; plus, people are afraid of smart persons they don't get.

The moment he knocks the door : i think many autistic people can relate... When you try really hard to do something difficult for you (unnatural) but you absolutely need it to achieve a goal.

Can't wait for next episode.



Desurage
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 20 Feb 2012
Age: 31
Gender: Male
Posts: 81

04 Oct 2017, 5:45 pm

Grammar Geek wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
‘Good Doctor’ Scores Full-Season Order at ABC

Quote:
The show has proven to be one of the more popular new series this season already, with the series premiere nabbing a healthy 2.2 rating in adults 18-49 and 11.2 million viewers according to Nielsen Live+Same Day data. The second episode of the series aired Monday night, also netting a 2.2 and 10.9 million viewers


I wonder why autistic savants/socially ackward geniuses are consistently so popular on TV and the movies


I wrote an article about autism’s growing representation in the media for my school’s magazine that touched on this:

“The fact that so many autistics in the media are given these [savant skills] seems like a way for people to make a realistic show but give a character a type of “superpower” that can make audiences ooh and ahh while at the same time provide the writers an easy way to solve problems. Does something seemingly impossible need to be accomplished? Autistic character to the rescue! It’s becoming a trope, and I’d like to see more realistic characterizations of autism.”


It's been a troupe, they just like using mental illness these days because it's trendy and mysterious to a lot of people, still.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doc_Martin
This is pretty much a show about a guy with autism. He's not autistic, he's basically just a grouch and downright dissociated from people. There's one scene I saw where he walks up to a bunch of pretty young girls at the beach and yells at them for not wearing sunscreen.
Realistic portrayals aren't the point. As a writer, I figured out that no one cares about the mental illness itself, they want the spectacle of the idea. The best way to do a realistic portrayal, as a writer, is to use real life examples and put them into the show and exaggerate them for entertainment, not to give people a literal textbook interpretation of what an autist is actually like.
If they want that, there's more than enough material out there studying autistic people. The real power of a story is to show people something they don't want to see in themselves and modeling the problem in a way they can process, like someone with a mental illness, someone they see as weak and lesser than them, overcoming their restrictions and making themselves useful to the community.
Shows like this are an admission of the place autism holds within the society at large. We are seen as underdogs, but also as wizards. Regular people are the audience, and what they want to see is what they think autism is, not what autism actually is, and as the show goes on we'll understand if the writer's made the choice to do the illness justice or the story justice. Usually, they fail miserably at both, but here's hoping.



theladyautist
Tufted Titmouse
Tufted Titmouse

User avatar

Joined: 18 May 2014
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 25

05 Oct 2017, 5:02 pm

First off I have to say, given the subject manner and how the title character is protrayed, I am indeed impressed and I will tell you why.

Where it is true it looks like the producers looked at a sign of the 13 signs of Autism and told the actor to protray them, on the same side, I can say that there are times, that as high fuctioning as I am, and as good as I am at faking normal a good majority of the time, there are other times where I too could be a poster child for that particular sign so I do not feel affended and am glad to see it in prime time.

This show is showcasing a side of Autism not often shown on tv. Most of the time it is all the negative things, be it for humor like The Big Bang Theory, or the more insulting like Rain Man. Here we see the positive sides too, that the way we see things, our ability to focus on the details that nobody else even sees, the very way that we think is shown as a good thing, not just that, but the very type of thing that can save lives! I at the very least have not seen anyone show that side before.

It also brings up very important issues that we DO face. Ableism in the workplace being front and center in my mind. It might be overdone, but it has to be, because alot of the time no one really understands just how hard it is for us on the job market. How often we are overlooked for jobs, or even promotions, no matter how qualified we may be, because of how people view those of us on the Spectrum. I have had friends coming up to me going "so that is what you have been talking about all these years!!" and it has started conversations in my family that have needed to happen for YEARS!!

It hit head on about the empathy/sympathy issue. You have no idea how many times I have been told that I don't have sympathy, or even that I don't have emotions or feelings, simply because I often do not display them in a way that nuerotypicals would understand. I thought it was beautiful that this show actually showed how passionate the young man is about his job, and that though his way of communicating it was different, it showed that we can and do feel about the people around us.

Of course I will be watching very closely. I reserve judgement as the show is still very new. My hopes are not high. But at the very least there are things that have not been talked about on a large stage before, amongst those that by and large are not within the Autism Community. They are conversations worth having and if nothing else, at least they are happening.



AspieUtah
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Age: 55
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,472
Location: Millcreek, Utah

05 Oct 2017, 5:53 pm

theladyautist wrote:
...at the very least there are things that have not been talked about on a large stage before, amongst those that by and large are not within the Autism Community. They are conversations worth having and if nothing else, at least they are happening.

Indeed. The program is "good enough" to bring in many individuals without autism. If it gets renewed for another year or two, I expect that the primary conflict (the lead character's autism) will be explored in more depth. For now, however, it feels as if we are enjoying the program while knowing that the mainstream audience is learning a lot.


_________________
Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)


ASPartOfMe
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Aug 2013
Age: 60
Gender: Male
Posts: 12,941
Location: Long Island, New York

06 Oct 2017, 2:27 am

Not to be overlooked is that they are openly identifying charactors as Autisic in “The Accountant”, “The Good Doctor”, “Atypical”, and “Chicago Med”. With the exception of Chicago Med the openly autistic charactor is the lead charactor. This is significant progress.


_________________
How can Autism be trendy and a popular insult at the same time?

Recovering from tongue cancer and suspected Ramsey Hunt Syndrome (Ear Shingles), somewhat verbal.
Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity


AspieUtah
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Jun 2014
Age: 55
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,472
Location: Millcreek, Utah

06 Oct 2017, 6:09 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Not to be overlooked is that they are openly identifying charactors as Autisic in “The Accountant”, “The Good Doctor”, “Atypical”, and “Chicago Med”. With the exception of Chicago Med the openly autistic charactor is the lead charactor. This is significant progress.

Yep. It is good to see fewer stereotypical caricatures of young autists and better developed characters.


_________________
Diagnosed in 2015 with ASD Level 1 by the University of Utah Health Care Autism Spectrum Disorder Clinic using the ADOS-2 Module 4 assessment instrument [11/30] -- Screened in 2014 with ASD by using the University of Cambridge Autism Research Centre AQ (Adult) [43/50]; EQ-60 for adults [11/80]; FQ [43/135]; SQ (Adult) [130/150] self-reported screening inventories -- Assessed since 1978 with an estimated IQ [≈145] by several clinicians -- Contact on WrongPlanet.net by private message (PM)


renaeden
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Jun 2005
Age: 40
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,250
Location: Western Australia

08 Oct 2017, 11:51 pm

I thought the main character was quite excellent in the second episode. Despite discomfort he recalled having as a kid, he still went through with knocking on a door in the middle of the night for medical reasons (one of the occupants). The way he handled himself made me want to clap (quietly).

Looking forward to the next episode.



Hypercoaster
Blue Jay
Blue Jay

User avatar

Joined: 15 Aug 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 81

09 Oct 2017, 6:51 pm

I watched the first two episodes over the weekend, and I was pleasantly surprised. It wasn't nearly as stereotypical as I thought it would be, and the medical science was actually correct and mostly realistic. It kept my attention due to the strong medical themes and the whole (entirely true) issue of how an Aspie (or anyone who doesn't fit in) could be thrown to the wolves in the hierarchy of medical school/residency. One thing I will say negatively, though, is I don't see this kid as a savant whatsoever. His "savant" abilities just seem to be a form of photographic memory.



BuyerBeware
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 28 Sep 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,587
Location: PA, USA

10 Oct 2017, 12:50 am

Desurage wrote:
Grammar Geek wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
‘Good Doctor’ Scores Full-Season Order at ABC

Quote:
The show has proven to be one of the more popular new series this season already, with the series premiere nabbing a healthy 2.2 rating in adults 18-49 and 11.2 million viewers according to Nielsen Live+Same Day data. The second episode of the series aired Monday night, also netting a 2.2 and 10.9 million viewers


I wonder why autistic savants/socially ackward geniuses are consistently so popular on TV and the movies


I wrote an article about autism’s growing representation in the media for my school’s magazine that touched on this:

“The fact that so many autistics in the media are given these [savant skills] seems like a way for people to make a realistic show but give a character a type of “superpower” that can make audiences ooh and ahh while at the same time provide the writers an easy way to solve problems. Does something seemingly impossible need to be accomplished? Autistic character to the rescue! It’s becoming a trope, and I’d like to see more realistic characterizations of autism.”


It's been a troupe, they just like using mental illness these days because it's trendy and mysterious to a lot of people, still.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doc_Martin
This is pretty much a show about a guy with autism. He's not autistic, he's basically just a grouch and downright dissociated from people. There's one scene I saw where he walks up to a bunch of pretty young girls at the beach and yells at them for not wearing sunscreen.
Realistic portrayals aren't the point. As a writer, I figured out that no one cares about the mental illness itself, they want the spectacle of the idea. The best way to do a realistic portrayal, as a writer, is to use real life examples and put them into the show and exaggerate them for entertainment, not to give people a literal textbook interpretation of what an autist is actually like.
If they want that, there's more than enough material out there studying autistic people. The real power of a story is to show people something they don't want to see in themselves and modeling the problem in a way they can process, like someone with a mental illness, someone they see as weak and lesser than them, overcoming their restrictions and making themselves useful to the community.
Shows like this are an admission of the place autism holds within the society at large. We are seen as underdogs, but also as wizards. Regular people are the audience, and what they want to see is what they think autism is, not what autism actually is, and as the show goes on we'll understand if the writer's made the choice to do the illness justice or the story justice. Usually, they fail miserably at both, but here's hoping.


This. While I don't exactly agree with the portrayals I've seen (still haven't seen Good Doctor, because KIDS on my side of the house, and opposite Scorpion which is MIL's favorite show on her side of the house, and not available on demand as of last time I checked), they're better than the portrayals in an Autism $peaks ad and better than what a disinterested layperson is going to get out of clinical literature.

In small words: I don't exactly LIKE being equated with or compared to Sheldon Cooper. But 60 minutes of watching BBT with my in-laws accomplished what over a decade of repeatedly trying to explain myself did not: Created empathy and something like understanding instead of always assuming the worst of me.


_________________
"Alas, our dried voices when we whisper together are quiet and meaningless, as wind in dry grass, or rats' feet over broken glass in our dry cellar." --TS Eliot, "The Hollow Men"


green0star
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 5 Apr 2016
Gender: Female
Posts: 768
Location: blah

11 Oct 2017, 10:53 am

I did see some of the show since my mom taped it. It seems to highlight alot of the positives of autism as well as the struggles since they didn't want to hire the guy to become a doctor but as we know not everyone can become doctors. Also savant syndrome and high functioning autism aren't the same thing so that's another thing.



Stoic0209
Raven
Raven

Joined: 15 Dec 2015
Gender: Male
Posts: 122
Location: New York

14 Oct 2017, 6:15 pm

The main character is excellent, and the guy who plays the President of the hospital is also very good. the rest of it however... I noticed glaringly humongous issues with the pilot.

First of all, the board openly discusses using the man's Autism as sole grounds for not hiring him. This is completely against the law in the US, as Autism is considered a disability, and reasonable accommodation must be made. What really floored me was when they were discussing this RIGHT IN FRONT OF HIM. I mean, do they WANT to get sued?!?

I think the show could survive solely on the main character's excellent portrayal, but the vast majority of the other characters are uninteresting and one-sided, and a lot of the situations require far too much suspension of disbelief. 2nd episode was better, but I'm still waiting to see how they're going to pan out the story and flesh out some of the characters.