Page 2 of 2 [ 25 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

ASDMommyASDKid
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,781

27 Sep 2017, 6:51 am

DW_a_mom wrote:
Perhaps the real problem is the term "treatment."

...



I think that is what you are asking about. You just choose a word that has to many negative connotations for this community.

As for some of the items you listed in your post, I think what you've done is compiled a list of ineffective treatments at best, and harmful scams at worst. There are no short cuts to the process of helping your child reach their maximize potential. This is "get to know your unique child" work. PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR CHILD. Observe the relationship between action and reaction, realizing that reaction can be delayed. Identify stress factors. Work on communicating clearly (which is a two way street: your child not only has to learn to effectively communicate with you, but you have to learn to communicate effectively with them). And so on.


Oh, she picked the right word to describe what she is looking at for her site. Her site in its current iteration is a poster child for affiliated marketing autism scams. I am not really sure why she is asking about programs she has already decided to pimp, pretty strongly, but of course anyone who is going to pay her for click-throughs or purchases is going to be a scam.

Hopefully, if the OP is sincere and not just looking for testimonials and sales, she will revamp her site.



DW_a_mom
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 22 Feb 2008
Age: 59
Gender: Female
Posts: 10,922
Location: Northern California

27 Sep 2017, 3:18 pm

ASDMommyASDKid wrote:
DW_a_mom wrote:
Perhaps the real problem is the term "treatment."

...



I think that is what you are asking about. You just choose a word that has to many negative connotations for this community.

As for some of the items you listed in your post, I think what you've done is compiled a list of ineffective treatments at best, and harmful scams at worst. There are no short cuts to the process of helping your child reach their maximize potential. This is "get to know your unique child" work. PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR CHILD. Observe the relationship between action and reaction, realizing that reaction can be delayed. Identify stress factors. Work on communicating clearly (which is a two way street: your child not only has to learn to effectively communicate with you, but you have to learn to communicate effectively with them). And so on.


Oh, she picked the right word to describe what she is looking at for her site. Her site in its current iteration is a poster child for affiliated marketing autism scams. I am not really sure why she is asking about programs she has already decided to pimp, pretty strongly, but of course anyone who is going to pay her for click-throughs or purchases is going to be a scam.

Hopefully, if the OP is sincere and not just looking for testimonials and sales, she will revamp her site.


Ah, I hadn't checked out the site.

It does need some revamping. And rewording.

to the OP: Supplements are not a treatment. If a supplement works for an individual it is because that particular individual may have been lacking in certain nutrients or have otherwise been unhealthy in a way that made their symptoms appear worse. Many behaviors we associate with ASD are self-calming, so there is a natural correlation between feeling crummy because you are unhealthy, and engaging in those behaviors. Food issues may be co-morbid with ASD, but they are not part of ASD.


_________________
Mom to an amazing AS college son (plus a non-AS high school daughter). Most likely part of the "Broader Autism Phenotype" (some traits).


sunshinescj
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 16 Mar 2014
Age: 17
Gender: Female
Posts: 152
Location: Ohio, USA

26 Oct 2017, 5:11 pm

eikonabridge wrote:
SharkSandwich211 wrote:
I think if you are looking to find out about treatments that work for AS/ASD...your time would be well spent at looking into the treatments of the co-morbids that you address in one of your later posts...Anxiety, Depression, OCD, etc. As well as some of the other things that are often associated with it for example SPD. All of these are stand alone categories from a diagnostic criteria but they also just happen to be what results when you are on the spectrum.

That's OK. But treating each and all of these issues won't solve the real problem.

I would like people to look at this video clip about Helen Keller:


And then look at the three cases in OP's comment:

Quote:
- a teenager with AS suffers from severe social anxiety and depression, has trouble talking to kids at school, has no friends, feels lonely, may be suicidal, suffers from migraines due to sensory issues, has trouble sleeping and doing homework assignments

- a 10 year old with AS has trouble making friends, feels lonely and neglected, has trouble sleeping, is very picky with what he/she eats, has violent outbursts and meltdowns, experiences sensory overload, becomes loud and disruptive in public places, has behavior problems at school

- an adult with AS has no friends, is addicted to video games, has severe social anxiety, stays indoors all the time, very picky about food, has sensory issues, prone to meltdowns


Frankly, most of the symptoms in these three cases, plus the case of Helen Keller, are pretty much consistent with the symptoms of someone that has been subjected to long-term solitary confinement.

And that's the problem with today's approach to autism. We treat the superficial, irrelevant issues. But we don't develop the brains of our children. We let the brains of these children go idle for 10, 20, 30 years.

What we are doing is akin to be talking to Helen Keller, who is deaf and blind. Our verbal and social cues are meaningless to autistic children, yet we persist in trying to communicate via these blocked channels. If Helen Keller hasn't been taught by touch, and learned things from Braille-style writings, she would have been stuck with violent tantrums for the rest of her life.

From age 2 or 3 and onward, all what our society does is to deal with those irrelevant issues, such as: (a) anxiety, (b) loneliness, (c) talking, (d) making friends, (e) violent outbursts, (f) sensory overload, (g) behavioral problems, meltdowns, (h) food pickiness, etc. By the time these children are 20 or 30 years old, guess what? We are still trying to deal with the very same issues.

Don't people see that the problem is not there with these issues, at all?

Why did Helen Keller turned out OK?

She turned out OK because she was communicated in the proper channel: by touch. She was also able to output by writing (and typing), thus closing her "outer feedback loop." Once the outer feedback loop is closed, the inner feedback loop in her brain is also established, hence has allowed her to develop deep thinking skills.

Autistic children communicate via visual-manual channel. You don't communicate through that channel and all you do is to treat the irrelevant issues, 20, 30 years later the children will still be stuck with those issues.

Brain development is the key to solve ALL those superficial and irrelevant issues that people so much worry about. And to develop the brain of these children, you need to communicate through the right channel.

Everything else is a waste of time.

---

Was Helen Keller's violent tantrum behavior due to her being blind and deaf? Or was it due to the fact that she was underdeveloped, under-communicated-to?

Similarly, if you are an autistic adult, and suffer from things like anxiety, lack of friends, depression, suicidal thoughts, sensory issues, etc. Would you attribute those problems to your autism? Or are all those issues actually coming from your underdevelopment while a child?

Autism and underdevelopment are two totally different issues. Autism causes none of the problems. Don't blame your problems on autism. Underdevelopment comes from gross neglect on the part of parents and educators.

While I agree with you that commutation is crucial and helps everything else develop, what about people with ASD who are auditory learners and struggle with visual information? I don't think we should make this one size fits all and say nothing else matters. As for the OP outside of things that are proven to be harmful/ineffective what will work is depending on the person, in that way it's sort of pointless to make a list it's better for people to do independent research based on their personal needs.



BTDT
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Age: 54
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,959

26 Oct 2017, 5:58 pm

People on the spectrum should be encouraged to develop a special interest to build up their self esteem.
A lot of hobbies are downright cheap when compared to the cost of these treatments.
Most people on the spectrum can use some "alone time" to recover from the activities of daily life.
Even more so if they have to endure excessive social interaction or new experiences.



ASDMommyASDKid
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,781

26 Oct 2017, 8:49 pm

The original poster was apparently trying to promote her scam-ridden affiliate marketing site with her post versus actually trying to start a real conversation--given that when confronted with what her site was full of, she left.



BTDT
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Age: 54
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,959

26 Oct 2017, 10:50 pm

I not only got a lot of confidence building model airplanes out of balsa wood and tissue paper but I'm sure it helped my hand eye coordination. Amazingly enough my coordination has been getting better with age. And I'm now 54! I hardly ever cut myself accidentally these days when I work with knives and other sharp tools. Which is good since I bought some really sharp knives after learning to cook with cheap ones the past few years.



rowan_nichol
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

Joined: 28 Jul 2016
Age: 54
Gender: Male
Posts: 308
Location: England

27 Oct 2017, 4:56 pm

ASDMommyASDKid wrote:
The original poster was apparently trying to promote her scam-ridden affiliate marketing site with her post versus actually trying to start a real conversation--given that when confronted with what her site was full of, she left.


Well, I think we can put that down as a job well done.



ASDMommyASDKid
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Oct 2011
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,781

27 Oct 2017, 10:38 pm

rowan_nichol wrote:
ASDMommyASDKid wrote:
The original poster was apparently trying to promote her scam-ridden affiliate marketing site with her post versus actually trying to start a real conversation--given that when confronted with what her site was full of, she left.


Well, I think we can put that down as a job well done.


Ha Ha. Agreed. :)



League_Girl
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2010
Gender: Female
Posts: 22,313
Location: Pacific Northwest

28 Oct 2017, 1:39 am

Lisa.a wrote:
Based on the responses on this thread so far, perhaps I need to clarify a few things...

I am NOT trying to find a cure, sell a cure, or actually cure autism or AS.

I am merely seeking things that would help reduce or eliminate the harmful (in the physical, mental, and emotional sense) aspects of AS and other high-functioning forms of autism.

For example...

- a teenager with AS suffers from severe social anxiety and depression, has trouble talking to kids at school, has no friends, feels lonely, may be suicidal, suffers from migraines due to sensory issues, has trouble sleeping and doing homework assignments

- a 10 year old with AS has trouble making friends, feels lonely and neglected, has trouble sleeping, is very picky with what he/she eats, has violent outbursts and meltdowns, experiences sensory overload, becomes loud and disruptive in public places, has behavior problems at school

- an adult with AS has no friends, is addicted to video games, has severe social anxiety, stays indoors all the time, very picky about food, has sensory issues, prone to meltdowns

These issues prevent them from living a happy and productive life and they affect their families, teachers, and everyone around them.

A lot of these issues are actually related to each other and by addressing certain key issues it can resolve many of the other issues they are experiencing - I speak from experience.

Anyway, these are the types of things I am working on solutions for and have found some strategies that ACTUALLY work. While you all might not care about this information, I'm sure there are others who do.

If you have anything valuable to provide, then please do, but none of this hopeless negativity is contributing to my project. :/

The only time something is ever hopeless, is when people give up.



It looks like you are looking for treatments for comorbids.


_________________
I have a quilt of labels. I had a language disorder and a speech disorder. Then communication disorder NOS. My other diagnoses have been Language Processing disorder, dyspraxia, SPD, OCD, ADD, Asperger’s, anxiety disorder, adjustment disorder, anorexia nervosa. My mom’s labels of me are: eating disorder, anorexia, social anxiety, PTSD, just being sensitive and having the victim complex when I was a kid. And of course she says I’m normal and says the only thing I had as a child was language. Huh? I must have been a shitty person then and maybe a difficult child I was who had to be labeled because of incompetent school staff and mean kids who didn’t accept differences and because I was trying to be “normal.” :/

My blog: https://mynoneabdlthoughts.wordpress.com/


Aspie1
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 7 Mar 2005
Gender: Male
Posts: 5,140
Location: United States

05 Nov 2017, 12:54 pm

During my pre-teen years, when my AS was hardest-hitting, the only "treatment" was able to get is the degrading, invasive talk therapy. The therapist would grill me about my feelings, not believe me, and make me cry. One botch job session left me in depression for 2 weeks, where I cried for hours non-stop. The only source of consolation I had was my video games. My parents didn't seem to understand, and just attibuted it to teenage angst.

That's when I started (ab)using alcohol. I'd sneak it from my parents' liquor cabinet and replace it with water, or I'd pour myself a glass from a wine box in the fridge. (I also liked beer, but I had no way of sneaking it without being caught/noticed.) Alcohol was the only "treatment" that actually helped me. One shot of whiskey lifted me out of depression like a Valkyrie carrying off a fallen soldier's soul to the Valhalla. Way better than months of rehashing my feelings with some quack. I can't think of any therapy that can achieve it even today, let alone in 1996.

During high school, I found a more reliable source of alcohol: bottles of cooking wine in the spaghetti aisle. I now laugh at the cashiers ringing me up. Those silly geese probably thought I was going to make pasta sauce. Although in their defense, I'd also buy a can of stewed tomatos or a jar of capers as a diversion. Then, I chugged the wine alone in my room, after stressful days at school. Also after happy nights later in high school, when I made actual friends and started hanging out with them outside of school. It tasted nasty, but was nearly as effective as whiskey.

In fact, if I could run America like a dictator, I'd make alcohol available by prescription to aspie children age 10 and older. While "sharing your feelings" is all well and good, sometimes an aspie child needs a fast jolt of happiness that only a shot of whiskey can deliver.



cron