Has Anyone Had Their Driving License Affected

Page 1 of 3 [ 31 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,119
Location: UK

07 Oct 2017, 4:36 am

I was just reading up on how ASD can affect driving and noticed you have to notify the DVLA if you get diagnosed with Asperger's and it affects your driving.

I may be jumping the gun here as I haven't even had a Dx. The only problem I have when driving is at night when it always feels like every car is driving with their high beams on.

Has anyone had any complications when notifying the DVLA ( or the relevant driving authorities in your country ) or even had their license taken off them?


_________________
Flipping like a pancake, popping like a cork,
Fleagle, Bingo, Drooper, and Snork.


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 37,414
Location: Queens, NYC

07 Oct 2017, 5:49 am

We don't have a requirement like that in New York State.

You can't drive if you've had an epileptic seizure leading to unconsciousness within the past six months.

Why get a diagnosis, anyway? Would it provide any benefit for you?



SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,119
Location: UK

07 Oct 2017, 6:13 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
We don't have a requirement like that in New York State.

You can't drive if you've had an epileptic seizure leading to unconsciousness within the past six months.

Why get a diagnosis, anyway? Would it provide any benefit for you?


I'm the type of person who needs to know what's wrong or right with them so I think it will be of immense benefit knowing if I have ASD , also the assessor may be able to spot what's wrong with me if I don't have ASD. I can plan my treatments once I know what's wrong with me.


_________________
Flipping like a pancake, popping like a cork,
Fleagle, Bingo, Drooper, and Snork.


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 37,414
Location: Queens, NYC

07 Oct 2017, 6:35 am

How about if it affects your ability to drive?

You're really limited in most parts of the US if you are unable to drive. It severely restricts your job choices, for example.

Of course, I understand you want to know what makes yourself tick.

Asperger's, really, is such a subjective diagnosis. One clinician might think you definitely have it; whereas another will completely dismiss the idea.



SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,119
Location: UK

07 Oct 2017, 6:49 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
How about if it affects your ability to drive?

You're really limited in most parts of the US if you are unable to drive. It severely restricts your job choices, for example.

Of course, I understand you want to know what makes yourself tick.

Asperger's, really, is such a subjective diagnosis. One clinician might think you definitely have it; whereas another will completely dismiss the idea.


I don't think any issues I have affect my ability to drive ? If I'm told I can't drive it will be inconvenient but a downside I will have to live with , I don't want to be a danger to anyone. I will take a retest if necessary.

As for being subjective , maybe your right but I am not happy to self diagnose although I have no issue with people who do.
I have no problem having something on my permanent record even if it's my worst fear - schizophrenia


_________________
Flipping like a pancake, popping like a cork,
Fleagle, Bingo, Drooper, and Snork.


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 37,414
Location: Queens, NYC

07 Oct 2017, 6:56 am

But suppose you really DON'T have the condition which is on your permanent record, and which is severely restricting you?

Im actually thinking you might have a slight case of "night blindness," since every headlight appears to you to be on "high beams." I get that impression, too, some nights.

It doesn't mean you have it. Just something to look into.



SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,119
Location: UK

07 Oct 2017, 7:11 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
But suppose you really DON'T have the condition which is on your permanent record, and which is severely restricting you?

Im actually thinking you might have a slight case of "night blindness," since every headlight appears to you to be on "high beams." I get that impression, too, some nights.

It doesn't mean you have it. Just something to look into.


I get what you saying and it's perfectly logical. If I was 20 years younger it would definitely be a consideration or if my current life was going well. Nothing on my permanent record now is going to severely restrict me ( maybe driving ? ) at this point in my life , it is only going to help IMO.

I will look into Night Blindness , thanks for the info.


_________________
Flipping like a pancake, popping like a cork,
Fleagle, Bingo, Drooper, and Snork.


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 37,414
Location: Queens, NYC

07 Oct 2017, 7:17 am

If you do have nightblindness at all, it's probably very slight.



Chichikov
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 27 Mar 2016
Age: 43
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,151
Location: UK

07 Oct 2017, 7:50 am

I'm an excellent driver.

If your driving is not affected then you don't need to say anything. If you passed your test then you've been deemed suitable to drive so unless you have a condition that wasn't evident when you passed your test that changes your ability to drive like narcolepsy, fits and so on, then there's no need to say anything.



SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,119
Location: UK

07 Oct 2017, 9:57 am

Chichikov wrote:
I'm an excellent driver.

If your driving is not affected then you don't need to say anything. If you passed your test then you've been deemed suitable to drive so unless you have a condition that wasn't evident when you passed your test that changes your ability to drive like narcolepsy, fits and so on, then there's no need to say anything.


Thanks dude , that's put my mind at rest.


_________________
Flipping like a pancake, popping like a cork,
Fleagle, Bingo, Drooper, and Snork.


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 37,414
Location: Queens, NYC

07 Oct 2017, 3:04 pm

Have you ever had cause to doubt your driving ability through all those years of driving?

I've been able, actually, to do okay at driving despite having (mild) perceptual difficulties and problems with coordination. I've had a few fender-benders---but no serious accidents. I actually have no accidents on my driving record. i believe I am fit to drive despite not being "optimal" in a perceptual sense.

There's a pretty fuzzy rule, according to the National Autism society, which states that you could be fined 1000 Pounds if you fail to disclose a disability which might affect your driving. There's nothing about disclosing that you, specifically, have Asperger's Syndrome.

I'm not sure how much of this "rule" is actually enforced. I would say it would be very difficult, in the absence of a formal diagnosis, to prove that you have such a disability should you get into an accident.



AspieSingleDad
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 6 Sep 2017
Gender: Male
Posts: 248

07 Oct 2017, 8:39 pm

Ok, these assumptions that ASD people can't drive drives me crazy (pun intended)! My mom let me steer the car from the passenger's seat (irresponsible mom, but what can I tell ya) starting when I was 8. When I was 10, I steered an entire NJ to PA trip which lasted for 2.5 hours and included parking for eating/resting, etc. I got my driver's license when I was 16, and I have not had one accident for 24 years. I even drove a big rig for a year with absolutely no incidents.

I have no depth perception, and I had to take the written driver's exam three times to pass it (which is weird, I usually do good on tests), but I can drive like the wind. So yeah, let's not be making not assumptions that ASD people can't drive, and need to report to the DMV or something like we are bad drivers or something.

P.S. I've driven in Manhattan dozens of times with no incident, and that's not easy.



AceofPens
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

Joined: 8 Jun 2017
Gender: Female
Posts: 54

07 Oct 2017, 8:58 pm

I was wondering this myself a little while ago. I've yet to get even a learner's permit though I've been of age for several years. Whatever I have, it definitely affects my ability to drive. Chaotic scenes make my vision "blur" in a way that makes it impossible to track more than one source of movement at a time. Pretty obvious handicap on a road. I have a handbook right now I'm using to study for the test which says I have to get a doctor to fill out a form to certify that my condition won't affect my driving if I have one that has the potential to do so. That's Florida law. Seems pretty reasonable.



AspieSingleDad
Sea Gull
Sea Gull

User avatar

Joined: 6 Sep 2017
Gender: Male
Posts: 248

07 Oct 2017, 10:28 pm

AceofPens wrote:
I was wondering this myself a little while ago. I've yet to get even a learner's permit though I've been of age for several years. Whatever I have, it definitely affects my ability to drive. Chaotic scenes make my vision "blur" in a way that makes it impossible to track more than one source of movement at a time. Pretty obvious handicap on a road. I have a handbook right now I'm using to study for the test which says I have to get a doctor to fill out a form to certify that my condition won't affect my driving if I have one that has the potential to do so. That's Florida law. Seems pretty reasonable.


What specific condition is requiring you to get a doctor's note? Autism?



SaveFerris
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 3 Sep 2016
Age: 46
Gender: Male
Posts: 3,119
Location: UK

07 Oct 2017, 11:09 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Have you ever had cause to doubt your driving ability through all those years of driving?

I've been able, actually, to do okay at driving despite having (mild) perceptual difficulties and problems with coordination. I've had a few fender-benders---but no serious accidents. I actually have no accidents on my driving record. i believe I am fit to drive despite not being "optimal" in a perceptual sense.

There's a pretty fuzzy rule, according to the National Autism society, which states that you could be fined 1000 Pounds if you fail to disclose a disability which might affect your driving. There's nothing about disclosing that you, specifically, have Asperger's Syndrome.

I'm not sure how much of this "rule" is actually enforced. I would say it would be very difficult, in the absence of a formal diagnosis, to prove that you have such a disability should you get into an accident.


I always doubt my driving :lol: My GF says I'm a very safe driver and I do drive like a grandad ( no offense to any grandads out there ) .

The rule in the UK is pretty much the same , the DVLA state "You can be fined up to £1,000 if you don’t tell DVLA about a medical condition that affects your driving. You may be prosecuted if you’re involved in an accident as a result.".

As Chichikov said , if your driving isn't affected by your condition then no need to inform them.


_________________
Flipping like a pancake, popping like a cork,
Fleagle, Bingo, Drooper, and Snork.