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richardbenson
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02 Apr 2009, 10:48 pm

im trying to get a dan marino rookie. i had one but i dont know what happend to it :twisted:


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syzygyish
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02 Apr 2009, 10:54 pm

An Octopus has 9 brains, one larger one and another 8 smaller ones,
one for each arm.


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some

people say eyes are the windows into the soul
but aren't hearts, minds and souls
the window into which you should look?


Lily_cat
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03 Apr 2009, 7:31 pm

If you have 3 quarters, 4 dimes, and 4 pennies, you have $1.19. You also have the largest amount of money in coins without being able to make change for a dollar.



jawbrodt
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03 Apr 2009, 8:02 pm

^ 8)



Pennsylvania is a bad place to live when one of your obsessions is to be a rockhound, and search for rare rock and gems. :ncool:


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Those who know, don't speak.


CelticGoddess
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03 Apr 2009, 8:06 pm

Whales have hip bones from the days that they used to be land mammals, before they evolved into water mammals.



McTell
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03 Apr 2009, 8:09 pm

There is a verse in God Save the Queen (UK national anthem) which mentions crushing rebellious Scots. I don't think that bit is sung too often in public occasions now though.



syzygyish
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03 Apr 2009, 8:22 pm

This is a little bit from a science radio show I just listened to.

Quote:
James Elser: So a 400%, a four-fold increase in the amount of phosphorous is now moving in the biosphere because we're mobilising all this phosphorous from phosphorous mines into the biosphere, and of course it's running off downriver, downstream, downhill and we're deluding it back into the ocean. So the question is; how long can we do this for? The answer seems to be; not much longer. The estimates I've seen is that there might be 30 to 60 years of high grade phosphorous left in phosphorous mines.

So people are now writing articles about...you've probably heard of peak oil, now they're talking about peak phosphorous. The easy places to find phosphorous are all gone and we start to run out, and so people are starting to worry that this is ultimately going to be the limit on human sustainability, is our phosphorous supply. And in fact some people are starting to do something about it. I've read articles that in Sweden there are engineers and designers designing special urinals and toilets to separate the urine stream from the rest of the water supply to recapture the phosphorous from human urine, which I think is really ironic actually because if you look at the history of science, phosphorous was discovered in the 18th century by an alchemist who was looking for the Philosopher's Stone. And he did this, he found what he thought was the Philosopher's Stone, a glowing substance which turned out to be elemental phosphorous. He found it by collecting large amounts of urine from beer-drinking German soldiers and then heating it and evaporating it away until he got only the phosphorous left.

Robyn Williams: And that exploded.

James Elser: I don't know if it exploded, it glowed in the dark, and so phosphorous was the first element that was actually purified and discovered from human urine, and now here we are, full circle, thinking about phosphorous again and human urine seems to becoming a valuable limiting resource for the future of humanity.

Robyn Williams: You're not taking the piss are you?

James Elser: [laughs]

Robyn Williams: And no, he wasn't. James Elser is Professor of Ecology at the Arizona State University in Phoenix. One way we could save the element is by banning those white phosphorous bombs they're dropping on people in the Middle East right now.


It was about a scientist studying the effects on Stromatolites of the increase of phosphorus in the ecosystem.

It's very interesting all the things phosphorus is important for.:chin:

Full transcript or listen to the audio here:

http://www.abc.net.au/rn/scienceshow/st ... 528191.htm


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Be kinder than necessary for everyone is fighting some kind of battle
-Jaleb

some

people say eyes are the windows into the soul
but aren't hearts, minds and souls
the window into which you should look?


Lily_cat
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03 Apr 2009, 8:23 pm

Each of the suits on a deck of cards represents the four major pillars of the economy in the middle ages: heart represented the Church, spades represented the military, clubs represented agriculture, and diamonds represented the merchant class.



kornchild
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05 Apr 2009, 10:36 am

Here are some random useless facts:

-If you had ten books you could arrange them 3,628,800 ways on your book shelf.
-We share 18% of our DNA with weeds.
-We spend over 6 months of our life on the toilet.
-It is impossible to lick your elbow.
-No word rhymes with purple, silver, or orange.
-The most common name for a goldfish is 'Jaws'


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Henriksson
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05 Apr 2009, 10:50 am

"Oxymoron" is an oxymoron.


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NUFC_Fan
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05 Apr 2009, 12:14 pm

In the UK, Luxury tax is charged on chocolate covered biscuits, but not cakes. Due to this Trading Standards challenged Mcvities classification of Jaffa Cakes as cakes in an arbitrary court. After adressing a range of evidence, the court decided that cakes go harder in time, so Jaffa Cakes are indeed cakes.



kornchild
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06 Apr 2009, 10:21 am

every year more people die from cocunuts falling on their heads, than the amount of people killed by killer sharks.


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SamAckary
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06 Apr 2009, 4:20 pm

- Both Alpha Particles and Beta Particles are charged, causing them to be deflected from magnetic fields, unlike Gamma, which can travel directly through as it is a wave, not a particle.


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ThatRedHairedGrrl
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06 Apr 2009, 4:38 pm

Some interesting facts about the city of Seattle. (Well, I think they're interesting.)

Alki Beach, across the bay from the city, got its name when one of the early settlers, in a fit of optimism, decided the city was going to be built there and that it was going to be called New York Alki - Alki being the Chinook jargon word for 'by and by'. (They ended up moving across the bay because the water wasn't deep enough for shipping at the original site.)

The original Indian name for the current site of Seattle was Dzidzelálitch, which means 'place of the little crossing'. The city was later renamed after a local Indian chief who befriended Dr. David Maynard, one of the founders. His name was actually closer to Si'alh - the final consonant (which in the original, involves pronouncing 'L' while pressing your tongue against the roof of your mouth and forcing air out of both sides - try it) was deemed unpronounceable.

The downtown streets are, in order, heading north: Jefferson, James, Cherry, Columbia, Marion, Madison, Spring, Seneca, University, Union, Pike, Pine. The accepted mnemonic for these is Jesus Christ Made Seattle Under Protest.

After the Great Fire of 1889, the present Pioneer Square district was rebuilt and, due to flooding from poor drainage, it was decided to regrade the streets a couple of storeys higher. For a while, people had to climb ladders to get from the sidewalks up to street level. Eventually, the now underground parts fell into disuse, but parts of them have been reopened and can be toured.

The term 'Skid Row' - formerly 'Skid Road' - originally meant a downhill slide along which logs were transported. It was originally applied to the area around Yesler Way in Seattle (although the hill probably wasn't used for that purpose) and then spread to refer to generally impoverished areas in other American cities.

The Seattle school system was largely set up on the back of a bequest from one Lou Graham, who died in 1903. She was the city's most notorious and wealthiest brothel owner.


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Erminea
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08 Apr 2009, 3:21 pm

How one looks at things determines what one sees. All is quite subjective and it's the chosen perception what makes what one perceives. (not sure if this is more opinion than fact, I think it's true)