Report of the DSM-V Neurodevelopmental Disorders Work Group

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Moromillas
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07 Oct 2014, 9:40 pm

SignOfLazarus wrote:
It would probably be helpful to the discussion if you could review them and provide with clarity specific criticisms you have, then it would be more productive and maybe people would actually have helpful feedback.


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ASPartOfMe
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06 Nov 2015, 7:46 pm

Study says elimation of Aspergers has not increased stigma amoung American Adults
http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2015/11/05/study-downside-aspergers/20934/


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How can Autism be trendy and a popular insult at the same time?

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greenylynx
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28 Feb 2016, 1:02 pm

I find that article interesting. While there is no actual connection between the changes to the DSM and the rise of incidence of this, it genuinely feels like the use of Autism as the new r-word rose in popularity at the same time, especially in video games. I'm unsure about in other games, but it's definitely stigmatized big time in Team Fortress 2. For the past few years I've played on organized teams with other players in a league. There was one match this season that just was absurd to me. In TF2 you can set up a line of text to appear in chat when you push a key; I had a teammate that had a key set up to type "Autist down" into chat several times each time he scored a kill on the other team. Something else I've seen done is people purposely change their names with intent to insult as well. I had a friend change their name to "severe autism" and then somebody I did not know personally had their in game name set to "autism awareness" just because they thought it would be fun, and I can't count the number of times I've seen comments in this vein left on people's profiles just as a joke.



gingerpickles
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11 Jun 2016, 5:23 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
http://www.businessinsider.com/fewer-autism-diagnoses-with-dsm-5-criteria-2014-1


BINGO

at risk of sounding like a conspiracy nut.... now they can go "what epidemic"? and not examine the physical cause(s) of neonatal neuro damage that brings on the symptoms for example maybe previously said safe foods/drugs that were tested on the fly and by handwavium magic? maybe?

My belief is that the genes are already present that maybe a on/off coping mechanism for environment but they are getting switched on at too much frequency because an outside modifier maybe like autoimmune disorder of the brain. I might say it better with more sleep


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CEngAcolyte
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16 Jul 2016, 8:25 pm

JUST WANTED TO POINT OUT THAT THE DSM HAS ALSO CHANGED ITS POSITION ON ROMAN NUMERALS: IT IS NOW 'DSM-5,' NOT DSM-V



bryanmaloney
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20 Jul 2016, 2:55 pm

gingerpickles wrote:
ASPartOfMe wrote:
http://www.businessinsider.com/fewer-autism-diagnoses-with-dsm-5-criteria-2014-1


BINGO

at risk of sounding like a conspiracy nut.... now they can go "what epidemic"? and not examine the physical cause(s) of neonatal neuro damage that brings on the symptoms for example maybe previously said safe foods/drugs that were tested on the fly and by handwavium magic? maybe?

My belief is that the genes are already present that maybe a on/off coping mechanism for environment but they are getting switched on at too much frequency because an outside modifier maybe like autoimmune disorder of the brain. I might say it better with more sleep


Let's try this again: The "neonatal neuro damage" probably does not actually exist as such. What is more likely is that there is a cascade of influences, only some of which are actually neurological, that come together to produce ASD. As for "what epidemic"--there is no "epidemic", and any claims of an "epidemic" are just fear-mongering, as the South Korean study has shown. The South Korean study is the only one that diagnosed a complete age cohort instead of just making wild-ass guesses based on parent-initiated rates of diagnosis. What the South Korean study found was that about 2.5% of the population can be diagnosed as having ASD if you actually look at an entire population. However, most of them were not "in need of services".



CircusBear
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14 Dec 2016, 9:56 am

CEngAcolyte wrote:
JUST WANTED TO POINT OUT THAT THE DSM HAS ALSO CHANGED ITS POSITION ON ROMAN NUMERALS: IT IS NOW 'DSM-5,' NOT DSM-V



Excellent. No one needs roman numerals in their life.



Luna035
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27 Oct 2017, 4:21 pm

OutlawSteph wrote:
Tony Atwood has pointed some interesting problems with the DSM criteria of AS. They should look at his research.
I agree. I found tony attwood relevant, empathic and insightful.



ASPartOfMe
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08 Nov 2017, 1:51 am

https://spectrumnews.org/opinion/viewpoint/portrayals-autism-television-dont-showcase-full-spectrum/

Quote:
If you’re a fan of either of two new television shows that debuted in the United States this September — “Atypical” on the streaming service Netflix or “The Good Doctor” on ABC — I’ve got news for you. You’re watching an overly positive depiction of autism that doesn’t reflect reality for the majority of people on the spectrum.

To the TV-watching public, autism has come to mean the verbal, higher-skilled, savant end of the spectrum, because individuals at that end make for interesting characters.

Penny’s door is seen as cute and endearing; in real life, the stereotypies many adults with autism have are self-injurious and downright dangerous.

These enormous disparities reflect a broader challenge: The word ‘autism’ is applied so broadly as to be practically meaningless. In the previous version of the “Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders” (DSM-IV), ‘autistic disorder’ was defined as a specific cluster of characteristics, including abnormal social interaction and communication, and a restricted repertoire of activity and interests.

These days, someone with autism can have a genius-level intelligence quotient or have intellectual disability and a score far below average. It can include someone who has no language, minimal language or intact language. It can apply to an individual who has self-injurious, aggressive behavior, or someone who has trouble navigating the social scene in the school cafeteria. It can describe a person who graduated from Harvard Law School or an individual who exited high school with a certificate of attendance.

Thanks to years of research, we know that autism encompasses core features that are present in each person who is diagnosed. Every individual with autism has to have impaired social communication skills and restricted or repetitive behaviors to merit a diagnosis. But beyond that, these individuals’ abilities are vastly different. Saying someone has autism provides almost no information about the type of treatment they need; this is the opposite of personalized medicine.

The autism community must find new terms to apply to subtypes of the condition so that the diagnosis is meaningful and leads to a specific set of appropriate treatments. Developing more specific language around autism will allow clinicians and others to personalize their approach to care and provide benefits to all people on the spectrum.

The DSM-5 was supposed to do this; it was supposed to provide greater specificity so that an autism diagnosis would point toward potential services. But hardly any clinicians apply the criteria in the way they were intended. For instance, clinicians are supposed to use a table to indicate the level of severity. But almost none do. Instead, everyone is lumped together as having diagnosis 299.0: autism spectrum disorder.

The use of this term is a disservice to individuals on both ends of the spectrum, and to those in the middle. It may, unintentionally, be depriving many people of the attention and supports they need, because on TV, autism doesn’t look that bad. On the other end of the spectrum, several self-advocates who have discussed this issue with me recounted how hard it was to access services because they didn’t fit the mold of severe autism and “didn’t look disabled.”

Research has revealed how incredibly heterogeneous autism is; to use a single term to describe it is a contradiction

Hollywood’s blind spot — or maybe it’s a blind eye — speaks to our society’s aversion to confronting the realities of autism. But in the end, it’s not Hollywood’s fault that autism is presented unrealistically.

The reality of severe autism can be disturbing. What we see on TV and in movies reflects our own reluctance to deal with the enormous burdens severe autism places on individuals and their families.


Bolding and Underlining Mine

I am reluctant to post this because of what this author Alison Singer did 11 years ago. While criticizing portrayals for Autism she was involved in one of the hideous portrayals of Autism of all time back in 2006 when during an Autism Speaks promo in which she said in front of her autistic so she thought about driving off of the George Washington bridge but could not do it because of her NT daughter. But in this opinion, piece she says what a lot of us have said about the DSM 5 and while it is it emphasizes the unfairness of stereotypes towered the severely autistic it does mention the "not disabled enough to be autistic" crap to be autistic so many us have to put and the middle functioning was given a shoutout which I do not remember ever being discussed in an opinion piece.

I agree with her about the DSM 5 being the root of the many problems including the media stereotypes. I disagree with her that we need new terms. I would prefer subtypes because the core traits are autistic.


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How can Autism be trendy and a popular insult at the same time?

Recovering from tongue cancer and suspected Ramsey Hunt Syndrome (Ear Shingles), somewhat verbal.
Identified and joined WP August 26, 2013
DSM 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder, DSM IV: Aspergers Moderate Severity