Autistic Brains

In a Different Key – Interview with John Donvan and Caren Zucker

By on July 20, 2016

result123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536373839404142434445464748495051525354555657585960616263646566676869707172737475767778798081828384858687888990919293949596979899100101102103104105106 In Autism Talk TV Ep. 26, I speak with authors John Donvan and Caren Zucker about their bestselling book on the history of autism, In a Different Key: The Story of Autism.  In addition to being authors, Donvan and Zucker have worked for ABC News, where Donvan is an Emmy award winning correspondent and Zucker […]

It Takes Brains! – Autism Brain Net

By on November 16, 2015

result12345678910111213141516171819 When I was first contacted by The Autism Science Foundation about being involved in the It Takes Brains campaign, I honestly didn’t know what to think. The campaign has the goal of urging families and individuals on the spectrum to “make the heroic decision to register for brain tissue donation.”  It was certainly one of the […]

What’s MSSNG in #Autism? – By John Elder Robison

By on December 10, 2014

mssng_hero Yesterday a new hashtag campaign appeared in my Twitter feed – #MSSNG. It seemed to refer to autism, and a new research project. I had an immediate reaction, based on my interpretation of the letters in the context of the autism discussion – I thought, Missing?  Certainly not.  We may be gifted or we may […]

Autism Talk TV – Ep. 10 – Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

By on October 27, 2010

In this 18 minute episode of Autism Talk TV I sit down with Lindsay Oberman at Harvard Medical School's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center to talk about TMS, a technology that allows researchers to use magnets to affect the brains of individuals with Autism. First we have an interview with Lindsay and then you can watch me undergoing TMS.

Lindsay discusses the details of TMS and how it relates to Autism. She has been interested in Autism...

Do Autistic Brains Grow At Faster Rates?

By on December 5, 2007

According to a recent study, the size of brain structures in adult autistic brains look very different than those seen in autistic children.

Wrong Planet takes an in-depth look at this fascinating scientific paper published in the journal Neuron.

Read on for the exclusive article!

Your Brain’s ‘Love Chemicals’ may also make you Autistic

By on March 12, 2007

Most people with Asperger's Syndrome have some intense interest that they pursue with a passion (I'm one of those) and it's pretty clear that OCD tendencies go hand in hand with Asperger's Syndrome. Serotonin is the chemical that plays a role in causing aspies to pursue their special interests and similarly causes people with OCD to be obsessive or anxious. Certain levels of serotonin are also linked with the autistic tendency of...

Brain Activity Related To Processing Faces Is Similar In People With, Without Au

By on November 17, 2005

ScienceDaily.com reports: New brain imaging research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill indicates that when people with autism look at a face, activity in the brain area that responds is similar to that of people without autism. Study suggests that specific behavioral interventions may help people with autism improve their ability to interact socially.

fMRI shows difference in Autist brain

By on October 26, 2005

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) show a difference in the autist brain when compared to non-autist brains.

Abnormal brain activity during the observation of others’ actions

By on June 6, 2005

Google News reports: Money Plans, India - 3 hours ago
... basis of social interactions, researchers at Harvard Medical School and the University of Montreal have shown that individuals with autism display abnormal ...

Link to article

MRC Boosts Autism Research in National Brain Awareness Week, UK

By on March 17, 2005

Funding for a major new clinical trial to develop communication skills for pre-school autistic children and their parents has been unveiled by the Medical Research Council (MRC) today. It is one of two new awards for studies in autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) that together have received funding of approximately £1.5 million.