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Oodain
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04 Nov 2011, 2:02 pm

Cornflake wrote:
Ancalagon wrote:
"The process of preparing programs for a digital computer is especially attractive, not only because it can be economically and scientifically rewarding, but also because it can be an aesthetic experience much like composing poetry or music." --Donald Knuth
^^ This, especially. It's an art-form of the most intricate and detailed type.


nothing like the satisfaction of presenting work well done,
that said most of what i do program has no real purpose, except for the learning and the fun.


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Spacewarp
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04 Nov 2011, 4:14 pm

Oodain wrote:
Cornflake wrote:
Ancalagon wrote:
"The process of preparing programs for a digital computer is especially attractive, not only because it can be economically and scientifically rewarding, but also because it can be an aesthetic experience much like composing poetry or music." --Donald Knuth
^^ This, especially. It's an art-form of the most intricate and detailed type.


nothing like the satisfaction of presenting work well done,
that said most of what i do program has no real purpose, except for the learning and the fun.


I claim that that's the best purpose :)



LookTwice
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04 Nov 2011, 6:30 pm

ruveyn wrote:
Math, science and software is for humans. Politics and religion is for sub-humans.


And being judgmental is for everyone.



MacDragard
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13 Nov 2011, 12:32 am

You know you're a geek when you learn C++ for fun.



DC
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13 Nov 2011, 12:35 am

MacDragard wrote:
You know you're a geek when you learn C++ for fun.


Hah!

Real men refuse to learn anything more than assembler and C.

:wink:



MacDragard
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13 Nov 2011, 1:05 am

DC wrote:
MacDragard wrote:
You know you're a geek when you learn C++ for fun.


Hah!

Real men refuse to learn anything more than assembler and C.

:wink:

I know binary if that counts.



Robdemanc
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18 Nov 2011, 12:03 pm

I worked in the industry for years. It used to stimulate me so much and is far more rewarding seeing your program work than the money they give you to do it (and that was a lot).

It is a cool and funky thing to do, even the sad NT business people want to get in on it but their brains are no good for it most of the time.



SammichEater
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18 Nov 2011, 2:59 pm

Because watching a computer carry out tasks on its own is one of the most fricking awesome things ever.

It's like playing a game. A sandbox game, where the only rules are pure logic.


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Madbones
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21 Nov 2011, 8:42 am

I LOVE IT.
It has everything I love.
Compatibility, you can do it on almost anything.
While sitting at the compiler, looking at it... To think you can do absolutely anything with it is pretty stunning.
The logic, its definite, everything you code into its pure logic. It goes one way and no other.
Problem solving, its awesome, you can spend 3 hours writing 50 lines of code properly and making it do awesome things and solving problems.
Its something I can really sink my teeth into.


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chameco
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21 Dec 2011, 4:57 pm

I know most of the modern languages, but these days I do most of my work in two languages:
x86 Assembly: A program is a series of instructions. An operator, then operands, no exceptions.
Python: Again, nothing breaks the rules, and everything is easily categorized. I have what some call an irrational obsession with categories.



ruveyn
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21 Dec 2011, 5:19 pm

Mind over Matter. I like Using The Force.

ruveyn



pete1061
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22 Dec 2011, 10:28 pm

I think of programming as an extension of art.
I started drawing pictures, then I created sculptures, then I did 2D & 3D computer animations.
Programming allows me to take things well beyond simple animation into full interactivity and simulation.


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AngelKnight
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22 Dec 2011, 10:37 pm

cw10 wrote:
I've only coded in 6502 assembly. The good ole days of what is now retro computing. I enjoyed what little I did mainly because it allowed me to unleash the potential of the hardware. It's rarely done now, the computer you have is capable of more than what most people code for just because it's easier, and raw CPU power can compensate.

I also liked learning new techniques. Good programming is not only logical, GOOD programming is also clever.


65xx was interesting to fool around with. But trying to explain it to kids who are in uni today often results in exploded head debris flung around the room.

("What? There were just 3 GP registers to work with?? Why 3?!?! Everything had to share 256 bytes of stack?!?! What the deuce is zero-page addressing?!")

Yeah, there's less room for doing interesting things. Necessity's the mother of invention, and most situations bring more computing power than necessary for a given problem.



Ichinin
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24 Dec 2011, 3:50 pm

AngelKnight wrote:
Yeah, there's less room for doing interesting things. Necessity's the mother of invention, and most situations bring more computing power than necessary for a given problem.


Generally you just stuffed your code at $C000 and stored/loaded the registers on fixed memory positions to overcome that problem.


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leviathans
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24 Dec 2011, 6:21 pm

Programming is not that fun since you're spending 95% of your time debugging :x