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Beauty_pact
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03 Oct 2012, 3:49 am

www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-09/ ... et-name-it

http://jpsj.ipap.jp/link?JPSJ/81/103201/

Quote:
Japanese researchers claim they’ve seen conclusive evidence of the long-sought element 113, a super-heavy, super-unstable element near the bottom of the periodic table. It’s not yet verified by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, which regulates the table and the names of the elements — but if the IUPAC grants its blessing, the researchers could be the first team from Asia to name one of nature’s fundamental atoms.

Super-heavy elements do not occur in nature and have to be discovered in the lab, using particle accelerators, nuclear reactors, ion separators and other complex equipment. Scientists led by Kosuke Morita at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-based Science have been hunting for 113 for nine years, and have claimed to see it a few times already — but the evidence has never been this clear, the team said today.

In an experiment in August, the team used a customized gas-filled recoil ion separator paired with a semiconductor detector that can pick out atomic reaction products. They created element 113 by speeding zinc ions through a linear accelerator until they reached 10 percent of the speed of light. The ions then smashed into a piece of bismuth. When the zinc and bismuth atoms fused, they produced an atom with 113 protons. This atom decayed, incredibly rapidly, into a series of daughter products, each an alpha particle (two protons and two neutrons) lighter than the parent atom. The daughter nuclides are the clear offspring of element 113, and only element 113, whose presence can thus be determined.

/ ... /


I think it should be called animeium. :3



thomas81
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03 Oct 2012, 5:47 pm

i've often wondered, if these heavy elements don't occur naturally what is to be gained from creating them artificially?

We will never have them in sufficient quantity to have any practical applications.



Oodain
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03 Oct 2012, 8:08 pm

thomas81 wrote:
i've often wondered, if these heavy elements don't occur naturally what is to be gained from creating them artificially?

We will never have them in sufficient quantity to have any practical applications.


exotic materials sometimes reveeal exotic behavior, that then tells us stuff about the normal world we couldnt have predicted otherwise.

often to get to the stage where they even observe these properties is difficult.


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salem44dream
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03 Oct 2012, 9:00 pm

Could there be such a thing as a very different kind of planet that has such extreme atmospheric conditions and temperatures that these higher numbered elements would actually be stable there?



Species5618
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04 Oct 2012, 4:08 am

salem44dream wrote:
Could there be such a thing as a very different kind of planet that has such extreme atmospheric conditions and temperatures that these higher numbered elements would actually be stable there?

The particle is never stable, that is a property of the element and not its environment. The best you could hope for is an environment where these elements are formed spontaneously, but that would require extremely high energy and/or pressure and even then, the elements would still decay rapidly.



Oodain
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04 Oct 2012, 4:14 am

Species5618 wrote:
salem44dream wrote:
Could there be such a thing as a very different kind of planet that has such extreme atmospheric conditions and temperatures that these higher numbered elements would actually be stable there?

The particle is never stable, that is a property of the element and not its environment. The best you could hope for is an environment where these elements are formed spontaneously, but that would require extremely high energy and/or pressure and even then, the elements would still decay rapidly.


the only real way to slow down their clocks would be to accelerate them near the speed of light,

some of these elements have some relatively long lived isotopes, i dont know what would be required to spontaneously create them though.


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04 Oct 2012, 5:47 am

It is hypothesised that there -might- be superheavy elements that have isotopes that are reasonably stable on human timescales. Although it will be very difficult to make them - the isotopes we can make now are very neutron deficient, we'd need to find a way to add around 30 more to the atoms we synthesise.



ruveyn
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04 Oct 2012, 7:02 am

Since Japanese physicists discovered it, let us call it PearHarborium or So-Sorrium.

ruveyn



Beauty_pact
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04 Oct 2012, 7:55 am

ruveyn wrote:
Since Japanese physicists discovered it, let us call it PearHarborium or So-Sorrium.

ruveyn


Through that logic, I guess we should rename some elements discovered in the U.S. to Vietnamium, Iraqium or atombombium.

(I apologize, I don't mean to sink to ruveyn's level. =_=)



ruveyn
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04 Oct 2012, 8:11 am

Beauty_pact wrote:
ruveyn wrote:
Since Japanese physicists discovered it, let us call it PearHarborium or So-Sorrium.

ruveyn


Through that logic, I guess we should rename some elements discovered in the U.S. to Vietnamium, Iraqium or atombombium.



Atombombium is either Uranium 235 or Plutonium.

I was a 5 year old kid on Dec 7, 1941. I never quite got over it and I never fully forgave the Japanese.

ruveyn



Beauty_pact
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04 Oct 2012, 8:44 am

ruveyn wrote:
I was a 5 year old kid on Dec 7, 1941. I never quite got over it and I never fully forgave the Japanese.

ruveyn


I am very sorry to hear that.... however, why would you, by default, be angry at the descendants of the Japanese of that time? Most from that time, that had to do with their acts of war and such, aren't even alive, today. I have noticed this in previous posts of yours, as well. Being angry at a certain people, just for being that people, makes zero sense. Unfortunately, this utter lack of sense permeates history as a cause for both hatred and war. Just a neverending cycle.....



ruveyn
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04 Oct 2012, 10:22 am

Beauty_pact wrote:
ruveyn wrote:
I was a 5 year old kid on Dec 7, 1941. I never quite got over it and I never fully forgave the Japanese.

ruveyn


I am very sorry to hear that.... however, why would you, by default, be angry at the descendants of the Japanese of that time? Most from that time, that had to do with their acts of war and such, aren't even alive, today. I have noticed this in previous posts of yours, as well. Being angry at a certain people, just for being that people, makes zero sense. Unfortunately, this utter lack of sense permeates history as a cause for both hatred and war. Just a neverending cycle.....


Just about every Japanese person alive was either born since the war or was a very young child so they are clear. HOWEVER when it comes to discussing the war in Japan , they evade and digress their wrong doing. This is reflected in Japanese history and in textbooks when they deal with the period from 1930 to 1945. They never quite face up to how nasty their leaders were.

ruveyn



salem44dream
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04 Oct 2012, 8:56 pm

ruveyn wrote:
Atombombium is either Uranium 235 or Plutonium.


Hydrogenbombium is either Hydrogen 1 or Helium 2



Oodain
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05 Oct 2012, 5:48 am

ruveyn wrote:
Beauty_pact wrote:
ruveyn wrote:
I was a 5 year old kid on Dec 7, 1941. I never quite got over it and I never fully forgave the Japanese.

ruveyn


I am very sorry to hear that.... however, why would you, by default, be angry at the descendants of the Japanese of that time? Most from that time, that had to do with their acts of war and such, aren't even alive, today. I have noticed this in previous posts of yours, as well. Being angry at a certain people, just for being that people, makes zero sense. Unfortunately, this utter lack of sense permeates history as a cause for both hatred and war. Just a neverending cycle.....


Just about every Japanese person alive was either born since the war or was a very young child so they are clear. HOWEVER when it comes to discussing the war in Japan , they evade and digress their wrong doing. This is reflected in Japanese history and in textbooks when they deal with the period from 1930 to 1945. They never quite face up to how nasty their leaders were.

ruveyn


no one anywhere ever fesses up to the stuff they dopas a nation, denmark and america included,

still not a justification for how you talk and it reflects badly upon you.(for while you are free to say what you will we are free to judge you on it)


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thomas81
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05 Oct 2012, 5:56 pm

salem44dream wrote:
Could there be such a thing as a very different kind of planet that has such extreme atmospheric conditions and temperatures that these higher numbered elements would actually be stable there?


I think the other issue is that these elements are extremely radioactive with a small half life.

Its difficult to analyse a specific isotope because they decay that damn fast.



thomas81
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05 Oct 2012, 6:03 pm

ruveyn wrote:

Atombombium is either Uranium 235 or Plutonium.

I was a 5 year old kid on Dec 7, 1941. I never quite got over it and I never fully forgave the Japanese.

ruveyn


Were you even in Hawaii when it happened?

I appreciate the similarities to that and 9/11 for comparison. Though i never understood the feeling of collective personal anger; ie why would someone 1000 miles away feel affected. We never had that during the 7/7 bombing of London, or even the IRA bombings during the 80s and 90s. Most brits didnt give a s**t. There certainly wasn't a national 'vendetta' or appetite for vengeance.