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Dataunit
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29 Apr 2018, 2:13 am

I love pharmacology because it's so interesting to learn how the body works and how it can be altered by external substances, including food. For some reason, I've always been better at subjects I discovered on my own (such as pharmacology and philosophy) and bad at subjects I was forced to do, such as maths (where my grandmother forced me to take extra lessons every evening after school and on weekends). I've read that this is common in autism: autistic people are good at subjects they find by themselves but can be notoriously difficult to teach formally.


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DarthMetaKnight
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29 Apr 2018, 9:03 am

Science also appeals to autistics because prehistoric whales are cool.
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ToughDiamond
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29 Apr 2018, 9:24 am

Dataunit wrote:
autistic people are good at subjects they find by themselves but can be notoriously difficult to teach formally.

I think that's often the case. I thought I must have brain damage during my final years at school, but it was a strange kind of brain damage that allowed me to fathom the intricacies of building a multi-track tape recorder from cheap second-hand ordinary tape recorders and some electronic components. Dad was just the same, in conversation he could barely think about ideas outside his sphere of interest, but if he was interested, he would delight in thinking and talking about them.

But I guess that tendency doesn't explain the science appeal thing. It could apply equally to art.