Should students be allowed to use a calculator in school?

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Does kids should use calculators om math classes?
Poll ended at 17 Mar 2019, 7:17 pm
Yes 88%  88%  [ 21 ]
No 13%  13%  [ 3 ]
Total votes : 24

pawelk1986
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23 Dec 2018, 6:46 am

Prometheus18 wrote:
nick007 wrote:
I believe they should be a reasonable accommodation for people with learning disorders like dyscalculia & dyslexia. I have those things & using a calc was an allowed accommodation for people with those issues in my high-skewl.


That would mean is that dyscalculiacs receive a lesser education.


Lesser education? Can you explain?



Prometheus18
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23 Dec 2018, 6:50 am

A programmable calculator (TI-89, for example) is basically just a computer, and so it would be like being allowed to use a laptop. Fine in classes, I guess, but not in exams.



RichardJ
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24 Dec 2018, 2:07 am

We were allowed TI-nSpires even on portions of the SAT.

I'll never know why schools buy TI-nSpires when they are more expensive than netbooks all for less capability. The TI-84s they replaced were fine anyway. Just about spending ALL of the budget whether it is necessary or not. They claim to be short of funds these days, I wonder why...


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nick007
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24 Dec 2018, 3:33 am

Prometheus18 wrote:
A programmable calculator (TI-89, for example) is basically just a computer, and so it would be like being allowed to use a laptop. Fine in classes, I guess, but not in exams.
They say on the packaging for lots of models that they're approved for SATs & ACTs so I don't get why they shouldn't be allowed in exams.
I have a TI-86 that I used in class. I played games on it sometimes during class. It comes in handy when comparing stats in RPG games. I can see a few different problems written out & compare the numbers.


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Prometheus18
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24 Dec 2018, 3:53 am

I'm not familiar with the SAT exams, being from the UK, but, from what I can recall, you could program a TI-89 in advance to solve pretty much any problem likely to come up in the papers for the British equivalent (Advanced Level) examination.



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24 Dec 2018, 7:14 am

https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.o ... tor-policy

They won't let you use calculators that can communicate with the outside world. Or feature a better data entry technique.



Prometheus18
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24 Dec 2018, 7:42 am

pawelk1986 wrote:
Prometheus18 wrote:
nick007 wrote:
I believe they should be a reasonable accommodation for people with learning disorders like dyscalculia & dyslexia. I have those things & using a calc was an allowed accommodation for people with those issues in my high-skewl.


That would mean is that dyscalculiacs receive a lesser education.


Lesser education? Can you explain?


If they've been permitted to reach a given grade, while not having learned the same things as their non-dyscalculiac peers to get that grade, they leave school with a lesser education vis-à-vis those non-dyscalculiacs, while having been duped by a given grade into thinking otherwise.



BTDT
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24 Dec 2018, 11:08 am

Prometheus18 wrote:
If they've been permitted to reach a given grade, while not having learned the same things as their non-dyscalculiac peers to get that grade, they leave school with a lesser education vis-à-vis those non-dyscalculiacs, while having been duped by a given grade into thinking otherwise.


But, that is always the case. There are always exceptional students who will learn far more than anyone else. I figured out two variable calculus at before I completed high school education at 17 years old as part of a voluntary class I took during lunch time taught by a highly gifted teacher for his enthusiastic students. As well as those who learn far less. Educational achievement is just a much a spectrum as autism is a spectrum.



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24 Dec 2018, 12:31 pm

Space50 wrote:
Calculators are useful tools and have some place in math education. However it is still important for kids to learn how to do math by hand. Calculators don't replace mental math. Calculators are meant to aid with math, not replace having math skills.

Define "math skills".
Mathematics is more that just arithmetic, and having the right to use calculators from middle school made a great difference for me, as I had a lot more ease with algebra and what came after that with arithmetic; to the point of having perfect scores in algebra tests and some mathematics beyond, while I was struggling with mathematics test in elementary school.
I'm bad at arithmetic, but not in all of mathematics.



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24 Dec 2018, 1:10 pm

BTDT wrote:
Prometheus18 wrote:
If they've been permitted to reach a given grade, while not having learned the same things as their non-dyscalculiac peers to get that grade, they leave school with a lesser education vis-à-vis those non-dyscalculiacs, while having been duped by a given grade into thinking otherwise.


But, that is always the case. There are always exceptional students who will learn far more than anyone else. I figured out two variable calculus at before I completed high school education at 17 years old as part of a voluntary class I took during lunch time taught by a highly gifted teacher for his enthusiastic students. As well as those who learn far less. Educational achievement is just a much a spectrum as autism is a spectrum.


The point I'm making is about the corruption of standards.



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24 Dec 2018, 6:13 pm

SRSLY?

Everyone in my class were using calculators. I remember my math teacher was like: "in my time we weren't allowed to use them". I got 85 in math and that was even in the LOWEST level of math class (yes, all the idiots who have trouble in practical subjects)

I would be damned without a calc. I thank the guy who invented it, he made me graduate high school so I could do my Bachelors in something not math related. However my Masters is more related to math/physics and I like it - just as long as I don't do the calculations on paper (that's what computers are for).



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27 Dec 2018, 8:53 am

Calculators are useful, but they don't make math skills no longer important just like audio books don't make knowing how to read no longer important and spell check doesn't make knowing how to spell no longer important.



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27 Dec 2018, 9:10 am

Yes, in many places of employment automation has eliminated the need for human calculator skills.
Unfortunately for aspies this means that other skills, such as social interactions with customers, are now more important that your ability to calculate sales tax. But who can calculate sales tax with three significant digits? It is 6.35% in Connecticut.



jimmy m
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27 Dec 2018, 12:26 pm

Calculators are tools. Computers are tools. Some of the Math software available are really out of this world. It can take math tasks that would take weeks to figure out and make it possible to do it in seconds.

So I feel it is really important to learn how to do math long hand in school. One must know the basics. But then it is equally important to know how to use other tools like calculators and computers to streamline the process of getting to the correct answer.

Sometimes I shop for groceries or other items. Everything is automated. The clerks do not even know how to add and subtract. The cash register tells them how much change to return. Very simple. But sometimes the cash register doesn't alway work correctly. It may miss the discounted price and charge the original price rather than the sales price. The clerks sometimes are in a quandary not knowing how to figure and solve the problem. So yes I think the basics are fairly important.

I also think that it is important to know how to read a map. Everyone relies on GPS systems to navigate places and that is all fine and good. But a massive solar storm can destroy the GPS satellites and the GPS system can as a result become inoperative. And I worry that many people will be unable to even find their way home. Map reading is a basic tool in navigation.



Prometheus18
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27 Dec 2018, 12:39 pm

I agree with everything Jimmy said; children leaving school unable to do basic arithmetic or to read/write/speak proper English is one of the most terrifying trends in the modern world. Cartographic illiteracy is another thing that really gets on my nerves. Where were the teachers and parents?