A sour taste for Guardians of the Galaxy

Page 2 of 2 [ 30 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

Moviefan2k4
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 20 Sep 2013
Age: 39
Gender: Male
Posts: 977
Location: Texas

29 Nov 2014, 8:10 pm

If coyotes would just stick to hunting road-runners, everything would be fine. ;)


_________________
God, guns, and guts made America; let's keep all three.


Fnord
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 May 2008
Gender: Male
Posts: 39,667
Location: Stendec

29 Nov 2014, 8:34 pm

Another day...

Image


... another disaster!


_________________
You don't have to be popular to be a good person, but...
You almost always have to be a good person to be popular!


RustDogofAus
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jan 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 72

01 Dec 2014, 3:23 am

slenkar wrote:
I was basically making a statement that we eat cows, so we treat animals badly overall.

What if the choice was between a cow meeting a painful death at the claws of a coyote or the coyote being shot?
Sometimes morality is not so cut and dry.


The 'grab your gun' mentality is both barbaric and futile. It doesn't stop livestock losses and won't stop any others from killing. The solution is to co-exist and find alternatives, it is far more effective and cheaper to maintain. Even in places like South Africa, non-lethal measures proved to be more efficient at reducing human and predator conflicts.
Coyotes are shot just because they exist or because they are hated, just because someone thinks it's entertaining to kill an animal. And I've seen enough severed limbs and sick cold-blooded testimonies to find fur absolutely abhorrent just so some stuck up human can parade around in another's skin with the impression that they look hot. They don't. A Neanderthal with no concept of looking beyond their own nose.



mr_bigmouth_502
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Dec 2013
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,968
Location: Alberta, Canada

01 Dec 2014, 3:57 am

Fnord wrote:
If you're a carnivore, then why stop at eating only socially-acceptable food animals? People all over the world eat domesticated dogs and cats (even the Swiss!), and wild dogs and cats are just so much "Bush Meat", and given the choice of me eating them or them eating me, I'd much rather choose the former.

Sure, shoot the coyotes, but at least put their carcasses to use -- fur, leather, and meat can be harvested and even sold for profit!


I've been thinking recently; pigs are just as smart as dogs, if not smarter, yet it's more socially acceptable to eat pork than to eat dog. Why is this the case? Why do we put dogs on a pedestal, is it just because they're cute? It could be argued that pigs are cute as well. I'm honestly not a big fan of dogs, like, I don't hate them, and I even like some of them, but a lot of them I find them to be needy, hyperactive, loud, and super annoying. A few years ago I would have balked at the idea of trying dog, but now, if I were to find myself in Mexico or Korea, and someone offered it to me, I'd try it, provided it's already dead, and the animal in question was humanely killed. Many people would be horrified by the idea, because they see dogs as being something more than they really are.

Now, as far as cat goes, I'd be a little more hesitant, mainly because I really like cats, and they tend to harbor nasty parasites. But this is putting a purely personal slant on it; morally, as long as the animal was dead and killed in a humane fashion, again, I wouldn't see the problem with it.

Humans are at the top of the food chain, like it or not. What we need to do as a species, is exercise our position on the food chain responsibly, and in a manner that doesn't cause significant damage to other species. It's a tough thing to do, and we've already done lots of irreversible damage, but at least we are now learning how to help prevent further irreversible damage to the natural order of things.

Moviefan2k4 wrote:
If coyotes would just stick to hunting road-runners, everything would be fine. ;)


Too true, too true. :lol:



RustDogofAus
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jan 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 72

01 Dec 2014, 4:32 am

mr_bigmouth_502 wrote:
Humans are at the top of the food chain, like it or not. What we need to do as a species, is exercise our position on the food chain responsibly, and in a manner that doesn't cause significant damage to other species. It's a tough thing to do, and we've already done lots of irreversible damage, but at least we are now learning how to help prevent further irreversible damage to the natural order of things.


B.S.
I think people don't understand that top of the food chain is not a position of authority any more than it is an excuse to go around killing and 'managing' animals because we think we know how to run the world. Our involvement in the ecosystem has caused countless catastrophes and extinctions all because we threw our weight around with that notion. Too late for saying we don't cause significant damage, because our sadism, arrogance and greed is the leading cause of all environmental disasters in recent history and continues to this very minute. From extinctions to global warming, it is chiefly because of us. We are not stewards, we are tyrants.



mr_bigmouth_502
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Dec 2013
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,968
Location: Alberta, Canada

01 Dec 2014, 5:38 am

RustDogofAus wrote:
mr_bigmouth_502 wrote:
Humans are at the top of the food chain, like it or not. What we need to do as a species, is exercise our position on the food chain responsibly, and in a manner that doesn't cause significant damage to other species. It's a tough thing to do, and we've already done lots of irreversible damage, but at least we are now learning how to help prevent further irreversible damage to the natural order of things.


B.S.
I think people don't understand that top of the food chain is not a position of authority any more than it is an excuse to go around killing and 'managing' animals because we think we know how to run the world. Our involvement in the ecosystem has caused countless catastrophes and extinctions all because we threw our weight around with that notion. Too late for saying we don't cause significant damage, because our sadism, arrogance and greed is the leading cause of all environmental disasters in recent history and continues to this very minute. From extinctions to global warming, it is chiefly because of us. We are not stewards, we are tyrants.


I'm not saying we haven't caused significant damage, because we have. But the fact is, we are where we are, and we have to be more responsible as a species.



RustDogofAus
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jan 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 72

01 Dec 2014, 6:40 am

We should be more responsible but we aren't, otherwise this thread wouldn't be posted. Humans being on top of the food chain is a farce anyway, we're one of the weakest and most helpless animals for our size. We are not apex predators, we lack the ability to perform the natural selection process as is the case with wolves, bears and tigers, we weaken the animal species we kill instead of weeding out the sick and frail ones. We manipulate populations to unhealthy levels just to suit our own devices, we drive animals into extinction. This is not responsible behaviour. Canada, along with many other countries, has a horrible track record with animal welfare, because instead of understanding the balance of the ecosystem and catering to the interests of wildlife it panders to hunting/trapping and farming interests with wildlife coming up second in the hopes to find some solution much akin to Homer Simpson and his lobster-goldfish water salinity issues. Taking preference towards the lobster, if you take the metaphor. This does not work or at the very least creates a nonsensical cycle of unnecessary bloodshed. Human arrogance and stupidity are the primary causes of the world's wildlife problems, the thought that we know best when we don't, because the human race is only preoccupied with its own desires not the wellbeing of the others that inhabit this world.



mr_bigmouth_502
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Dec 2013
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,968
Location: Alberta, Canada

01 Dec 2014, 7:20 am

We are apex predators in the sense that we've figured out how to outsmart the other animals and dominate the entire planet, but you're right, it doesn't excuse our behavior. I'll admit, I like eating meat, and I like hunting as well. What I don't like are things like factory farming, and people who hunt purely for sport, just for "kicks". If you're going to take the life of an animal, there should be a good reason why, the way I see it. People often forget that animals are in fact living things, and that they can feel pain as well.



RustDogofAus
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Woodpecker

User avatar

Joined: 8 Jan 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 72

01 Dec 2014, 7:23 am

Let me spell it out for you.
Chris Pratt enjoys taking life. He loves killing. He gets a thrill out of it. There is something seriously disturbed with someone like that, no matter if it is human or any other animal. There is no getting around the fact that killing for fun is a psychological dysfunction, because no sane animal on Earth does it.
People who kill for food when there is food available are killing for fun. And save me the PR line of ethical hunter because I've seen way too much in my time to ever believe that.



mr_bigmouth_502
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Dec 2013
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,968
Location: Alberta, Canada

01 Dec 2014, 9:29 am

Well, I could mention how wild meat is healthier, cheaper, and tastier than the stuff you get at the grocery store, but I don't feel like arguing that point any longer.

Speaking of "killing for fun", did you know that dolphins do it too? They're pretty vicious creatures, like humans with flippers. If they had opposable thumbs, we would be doing tricks FOR THEM. :P



kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 62,647
Location: Queens, NYC

01 Dec 2014, 9:36 am

Are you near Fort McMurray, by any chance, Mr BigMouth?

I have distant relatives who live there.

Please don't think I'm trying to "zero in" on your location: I'm not.

I'm just interested in the Northern Alberta area because it's really fast-growing. Especially around Fort McMurray because of the shale oil fields.

I'm also fascinated because of the Chinook winds, which could raise temperatures, especially in Grande Prairie, by as much as 40-50 degrees Celsius in an hour or two. I've seen Grande Prairie at Minus 40 at one moment, and near Zero a few hours later.



slenkar
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 25 Apr 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,146
Location: here

01 Dec 2014, 12:47 pm

I went to check if he really does enjoy killing things and it turns out he does
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/go ... story.html

Also he literally EATS DOVES, the birds.



mr_bigmouth_502
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Dec 2013
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 6,968
Location: Alberta, Canada

02 Dec 2014, 5:00 am

kraftiekortie wrote:
Are you near Fort McMurray, by any chance, Mr BigMouth?

I have distant relatives who live there.

Please don't think I'm trying to "zero in" on your location: I'm not.

I'm just interested in the Northern Alberta area because it's really fast-growing. Especially around Fort McMurray because of the shale oil fields.

I'm also fascinated because of the Chinook winds, which could raise temperatures, especially in Grande Prairie, by as much as 40-50 degrees Celsius in an hour or two. I've seen Grande Prairie at Minus 40 at one moment, and near Zero a few hours later.


Like I mentioned earlier, I'm sort of near Ft. McMurray, but not really. A lot of people around here do go up there to work though. Also, Grande Prairie is pretty much on the other side of the province from Ft. McMurray. :P

Back on topic, is it wrong for someone to enjoy hunting? I don't mean in the sense of getting a sick sadistic thrill out of killing an animal, but more in the sense of channeling one's primal instincts, and becoming one with the wilderness.



Kraichgauer
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Apr 2010
Age: 53
Gender: Male
Posts: 40,168
Location: Spokane area, Washington state.

03 Dec 2014, 3:16 pm

RustDogofAus wrote:
slenkar wrote:
I was basically making a statement that we eat cows, so we treat animals badly overall.

What if the choice was between a cow meeting a painful death at the claws of a coyote or the coyote being shot?
Sometimes morality is not so cut and dry.


The 'grab your gun' mentality is both barbaric and futile. It doesn't stop livestock losses and won't stop any others from killing. The solution is to co-exist and find alternatives, it is far more effective and cheaper to maintain. Even in places like South Africa, non-lethal measures proved to be more efficient at reducing human and predator conflicts.
Coyotes are shot just because they exist or because they are hated, just because someone thinks it's entertaining to kill an animal. And I've seen enough severed limbs and sick cold-blooded testimonies to find fur absolutely abhorrent just so some stuck up human can parade around in another's skin with the impression that they look hot. They don't. A Neanderthal with no concept of looking beyond their own nose.


Please, don't slander our noble Neanderthal cousins. :lol:


_________________
-Bill, otherwise known as Kraichgauer


MadHatterMatador
Raven
Raven

User avatar

Joined: 13 Oct 2014
Age: 28
Gender: Male
Posts: 119

03 Dec 2014, 4:56 pm

Spider-Man 2 is the best Marvel movie.


_________________
Have Aspergers- Diagnosed
Aspie Score: 178
NT Score: 39
AQ: 46