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Fnord
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02 Feb 2021, 12:57 pm

NaturalEntity wrote:
I study by rereading my notes again and again. This helps a fair deal.
↑ This, plus writing and re-writing my notes in a more coherent form that agrees with the textbooks while focusing on key sentences and ideas.


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IsabellaLinton
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02 Feb 2021, 1:21 pm

When I have to learn difficult material which involves memorisation rather than conceptual comprehension, I use a big poster board and write the information in a mind map, with different colours of marker. I add cartoons, thought bubbles, and different types of lettering using various colours. The colours have a legend so I know what each colour means, if there's an extra layer of categorisation required. If you can't draw cartoons or pictures, print what you need online and stick it to the page.

By using a mindmap I can remember visually as well as spatially. I might remember that a certain formula or quotation was in red marker inside a blue bubble on the lower left corner of the page. Then I can picture it more easily and see it with almost photographic memory. This was how I learned multiplication when I was eight, and I still remember which colour was for which set of factors, as well as how they looked on my map. My map was stuck to the ceiling over my bed at one point, so I would stare at it when falling asleep.

I also use mnemonics, and I "put" bits of information in certain spots in my brain. I might tuck a fact behind my left ear or behind my right eyebrow just for fun. I can retrieve it more readily when I picture it spatially in that way, like being on a rolodex in my head. Sometimes I can retrieve information by association. For example I might remember what song was playing when I learned a certain fact, or what I was looking at out my window at the time. Then if I think of the song or the window scene, it all comes back to me.

I have synaesthesia so maybe this isn't a normal way of learning, but it's certainly neurodiverse.

Another study skill is to say the information aloud, because that allows it to be processed in a deeper level of our brain.

Mind map example:


Image
In my maps the lettering would be different colours and not just the lines, but this is a decent example of what I do.



kraftiekortie
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02 Feb 2021, 1:31 pm

I have very bad study habits....

I rarely take notes, and tend to learn “one thing,” which leads to “another thing.”

Rather like Piaget’s “schemas,” and also sort of like “Allegory of a Cave.”



icey winnie
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27 Feb 2021, 3:33 am

Hello. :) I also like to take notes as dense as a textbook, but since I went to college, I have gradually tried to use new methods recommended by my teachers.For example, after sorting out and framing the knowledge I have learned through the application of APP software and clarifying the knowledge context of the whole book, I find it much easier to take notes.Since I am a liberal arts major, this kind of combing can help me remember knowledge points better.I hope my answer is helpful to you.


Best wishes ! !! :D



QuantumChemist
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27 Feb 2021, 11:29 am

Rexi wrote:
For the longest time I struggled with learning until I passed out every day, until I was 17.

Magic happened, or should I say luck. I overheard two classmates who were talking about study styles and the top student has disclosed she actually aims to understand the content then stories it out in her own words. Following that day my grades boosted through the roof. Gone were the long days of torturing my brain and being shamed in front of the class for 'never studying' when I was doing it more than anyone else.

Later on I developped a style to remember things that were Latin plant and med names for my pharmacy classes, and this was done by literally adding very funny [and honesty perverted sometimes] similarities for the words either from other languages or from my own, and for the titles first letters like say 'The Adverse Effects of Antihistamines' -Toads Are Eating Autists, next one would be something else but in order to not forget any of the paragraphs or titles I would know like Toads come first, Snails second, or something like that.
And so i would laugh til my stomach hurt on tests like a total weirdo and my grades be sparkling incredible.
You can tell what my schemes looked like.


My old organic chemistry professor taught his material with dirty, raunchy stories attached to them. Steric henderence in a reaction process was always related to being blocked from having sex. Because you could not get those stories out of your mind, you remembered the material during the exams. He was tenured and everybody loved him, so he had no fear of being fired for it. There is no way I could teach like that, but I do give my students morbid stories about chemicals as we cover certain subjects. It is amazing how some students will pick up on the gross details of a certain story and remember it quite well many years later. My favorite ones to tell involve heavy metal exposures that lead to death. Look up what happens to a body upon toxic exposure in a diet to cadmium as an example.



Fenn
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19 Apr 2021, 12:34 pm

When I was in college I would sometimes read and walk at the same time. I took one class called "the history of science" which assigned a lot of reading. My room was always noisy, I was in an odd-campus apartment (just across the street from the main campus) and the library was always packed with people often chatting - there were a few "private study rooms" in the library but they were (nearly) always full. I read the assigned reading out loud as if it was an "adult" novel in the living room of my suite - at first people would come and sit and listen to me - the way I was reading it sounded like it might be interesting, when the realized it was really just dry stuff about the history of science the quickly lost interest and left the room. That was the only way I could find a place to read without everyone talking and breaking my concentration. Sometimes I would take the book and read out loud while I walked around campus - it was still noisy but no noise lasted for long because I would pass it. Noone nocied or cared what I was reading because I kept moving. For science classes I would do the homework and read the text book - in those days every class had a physical text book. I tend to retain most if what I read, but for hard formulas I would write up my noted on an index card - try to fit everything for one midterm on the frond of an index card and everything for the final on the back of it. I wrote small in pen - and used that to study. I would read the material and then close my eyes and try to repeat it. For some classes the professor would actually TELL everyone to write up an index card and even specify the size of the card - and you could bring it to the test as long as it all fit on that one card. My daughter uses apps on her iPad - one is flash cards, another allows her to take notes in color right on a PDF that the professor shares or a slide deck - she studies from that. My son is studying in Biology. I am trying to get him to try an app called Anki which is is really well recommended by pre-med and med school students. It kind of complicated to get used to using it at first but many many people really like it.
We also read a book about using mnemonic tricks like "pegging" and "elaborative encoding"
and "the memory palace" - I just used some of those techniques last night to help my youngest memorize the countries on the Central American land-bridge - we also use some of those techniques to help remember conversion factors for math class and the correct spelling of words for spelling tests. I recently read a study that showed using "memory palace" helped med school students do better on studying the "endocrine system".


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shortfatbalduglyman
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05 May 2021, 9:36 am

Inefficiently



Fenn
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05 May 2021, 10:00 am

^ LOL


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crstlgls
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20 May 2021, 8:48 pm

I study more and harder because I am also dyslexic, in addition to my Asperger's. And to now have to do 2 classes, I am unsure how I will juggle them both. I am going to do intro to sociology and multivariable calculus in the fall. I can be practicing math all day. When I did Calc 2, I needed 30 hours a week to study fully for it. I cannot do one, or I won't get financial aid. And I do not have $2726 to pay in one month when I barely get half that in income. The reading takes me forever.