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kxmode
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23 Jul 2009, 5:22 am

Sir Ken Robinson gives an amazing talk at TED about creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity. This is my favorite of TED's more than 700 talks. You'll see why after watching. :)

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iG9CE55wbtY[/youtube]

Here's some more gems!

Brian Greene's fascinating look into super string theory!

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtdE662eY_M[/youtube]

See how the science of spaghetti sauce radically changed the world.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iIiAAhUeR6Y[/youtube]

See boring data presented in fun and engaging new ways.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hVimVzgtD6w[/youtube]

Lots more fascinating talks from TED.com
http://www.ted.com/talks/list

With TED learning is fun! Enjoy! :)


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zer0netgain
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23 Jul 2009, 7:34 am

It depends. Creativity in certain areas (depending on political agendas) is encouraged. Anything outside of that is repressed.



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23 Jul 2009, 10:05 am

why is it than that about 50% of patents (if i recall it right) in US has foreign people (asian mostly) as inventors? these people come from more rigid school system that does not support creativity at all.

yes there aare many foreigners in grad school here and partly it can be explained by economics i.e. that is an easy immigration route however it can not explain all. my point is that you'll need some structure and persistence to actually produce something out of ideas or to sharpen them.
that is what school is good for, preparing you for the gruel life after. you need to sit, obey, continue with the meaningless tasks and manage to get something out of it despite the system.

but do not get me wrong, if you imagine all people being creative that would be a huge mess at this point. dull tasks also have their purpose and value. in terms of knowledge my (8+4+6+2+5 years of school) could have been done in 4 years tops. however can you imagine all the kids running around free, full of energy, it ould be a disaster.
that being said, it is silly to put so much pressure during school with long hours and homeworks because kids need their spare time to find themselves and grow as human beings too.



exhausted
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23 Jul 2009, 10:08 am

in answer to the question: yes.



kxmode
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23 Jul 2009, 11:12 am

Fantastic comment AnotherOne and I agree with you. However I don't believe Prof Robinson is saying that courses related to creativity be positioned higher than English and Math. He is saying that such courses should be taught on par with English and Math. Dance should be parallel with English and Math. Art should be tiered with English and Math. Musicianship... and so forth. There needs to be a balanced education so that young minds can not only learn the fundamentals to be successful in life, but are also encouraged to explore their creativity through various arts. I think a society that does this will produce better citizens, and humanity will ultimately benefit from this. :)


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23 Jul 2009, 3:07 pm

Whoa. I have a neighbor who looks just like Ken Robinson.

Weird.


I'll watch that video sometime.



AnotherOne
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24 Jul 2009, 9:46 am

kxmode, yes i agree that arts should be on par with math and english. for gods sake who ever uses anything more that basic calculus in their lives and they waste 12 years for math.
more relaxed environment in school with music and arts and special interests to add the personal growth.



Space
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24 Jul 2009, 1:31 pm

zer0netgain wrote:
It depends. Creativity in certain areas (depending on political agendas) is encouraged. Anything outside of that is repressed.

True. It definitely depends on what your viewpoint is. If you disagree with faculty politics, you are screwed no matter what you say.



immersive
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24 Jul 2009, 2:40 pm

Dancing won't help us engineer new bridges. Acting doesn't spur new advances in medicine. Painting can't be used to develop a faster, smaller microprocessor. The arts are fine as ancillary addition to a core curriculum, but nobody in their right mind should suggest that they should be elevated to the same priority as math and science. The latter actually solve real-world problems and advance our society in tangible ways.

That's not meant to imply that we're currently teaching them in the correct way. What we should do is embrace creative problem solving and emphasize critical thinking, rather than pander to standardized testing. But, I digress.



gemstone123
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24 Jul 2009, 4:39 pm

immersive wrote:
Dancing won't help us engineer new bridges. Acting doesn't spur new advances in medicine. Painting can't be used to develop a faster, smaller microprocessor. The arts are fine as ancillary addition to a core curriculum, but nobody in their right mind should suggest that they should be elevated to the same priority as math and science. The latter actually solve real-world problems and advance our society in tangible ways.

That's not meant to imply that we're currently teaching them in the correct way. What we should do is embrace creative problem solving and emphasize critical thinking, rather than pander to standardized testing. But, I digress.


I agree. Then again I'm a bit biased because I never liked drama and art. :lol:



kxmode
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24 Jul 2009, 8:20 pm

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiOwqDmacJo[/youtube]

Listen to the first answer from Neil deGrasse Tyson. Creativity can also mean that. :)


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and death will be no more, neither will mourning nor outcry nor pain be anymore.
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ruennsheng
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25 Jul 2009, 2:00 am

I guess very few schools will allow creativity unless they are truly good...


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11 Aug 2009, 12:56 am

immersive wrote:
Dancing won't help us engineer new bridges. Acting doesn't spur new advances in medicine. Painting can't be used to develop a faster, smaller microprocessor. The arts are fine as ancillary addition to a core curriculum, but nobody in their right mind should suggest that they should be elevated to the same priority as math and science. The latter actually solve real-world problems and advance our society in tangible ways.

If you were put in a completely gray, plain, boring world, you wouldn't enjoy yourself even if you had all the other stuff. Non-tangible things still have worth. Just putting some color in, or having a band visit, a retirement home can greatly increase their happiness. And isn't that the point of the technical advances as well? Giving people a better life?

Also, that story of the ADHD dancer might as well have been the story of an aspie. There's one thing that gets rated way above math in school - social interaction - and if you don't get that you fail. Basically, school says that there's one way of thinking that's Right™, and everyone else has some kind of disability if they don't get it. Plain wrong.