Is anybody with Aspergers an ACCA Accountant?

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Deinonychus
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09 Oct 2021, 11:14 am

Is anybody with Aspergers an ACCA Accountant?



Texasmoneyman300
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09 Oct 2021, 4:15 pm

I am sure there are some.I have a friend who might be one.There was a ben affleck movie called "The Accountant" and it was about accountant who had aspergers.I thought about becoming accountant because I love to learn about taxes so much but I have read a entire book about taxes and i talk a lot about taxes with my friend.It seems the detail orited nature of aspergers could help someone be a good one but accounting is a dying profession.



Joe90
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09 Oct 2021, 6:11 pm

No way am I capable to be an accountant of any kind. Numbers are just not a strength of mine.


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DW_a_mom
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12 Oct 2021, 11:51 pm

I do know autistic CPAs (the US version of chartered accountant). ASD can fit with the job but it really depends on the precise job. Advancement in the large CPA firms, for example, requires a lot of social skill, as the further up one goes the more pressure there is to be bringing in the clients. Bringing in new clients is a very advanced social skill. That side of business isn't mentioned often, but it is very real. But plenty of people only stay in public accounting long enough to get certified and build some credibility in the industry, and then switch to private accounting, in house at a large business, which hopefully won't have the same social requirements. Advancement to the top position, however, is still likely to take social skill, because controllers and CFOs have to interface and communicate effectively with company owners, the Board of Directors, and outside auditors.

I disagree with the poster above who called it a dying profession. At the moment, in the US, it is a very understaffed profession. I think there can be opportunity in it if you find yourself enjoying the work.


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Texasmoneyman300
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14 Oct 2021, 12:04 am

DW_a_mom wrote:
I do know autistic CPAs (the US version of chartered accountant). ASD can fit with the job but it really depends on the precise job. Advancement in the large CPA firms, for example, requires a lot of social skill, as the further up one goes the more pressure there is to be bringing in the clients. Bringing in new clients is a very advanced social skill. That side of business isn't mentioned often, but it is very real. But plenty of people only stay in public accounting long enough to get certified and build some credibility in the industry, and then switch to private accounting, in house at a large business, which hopefully won't have the same social requirements. Advancement to the top position, however, is still likely to take social skill, because controllers and CFOs have to interface and communicate effectively with company owners, the Board of Directors, and outside auditors.

I disagree with the poster above who called it a dying profession. At the moment, in the US, it is a very understaffed profession. I think there can be opportunity in it if you find yourself enjoying the work.

Well i think may we both be right.Because i heard there is going to be a lot of automation with the profession within the next few decades.But my friend told me that there prolly always be a demand for people with really complicated taxes like billionaires.I think there may be less demand for accountants for the middle class who dont have very complicated income taxes.Also, the top companies tend to prefer those who are straight A accounting grads.Those are just my thoughts.



DW_a_mom
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14 Oct 2021, 2:43 am

Texasmoneyman300 wrote:
DW_a_mom wrote:
I do know autistic CPAs (the US version of chartered accountant). ASD can fit with the job but it really depends on the precise job. Advancement in the large CPA firms, for example, requires a lot of social skill, as the further up one goes the more pressure there is to be bringing in the clients. Bringing in new clients is a very advanced social skill. That side of business isn't mentioned often, but it is very real. But plenty of people only stay in public accounting long enough to get certified and build some credibility in the industry, and then switch to private accounting, in house at a large business, which hopefully won't have the same social requirements. Advancement to the top position, however, is still likely to take social skill, because controllers and CFOs have to interface and communicate effectively with company owners, the Board of Directors, and outside auditors.

I disagree with the poster above who called it a dying profession. At the moment, in the US, it is a very understaffed profession. I think there can be opportunity in it if you find yourself enjoying the work.

Well i think may we both be right.Because i heard there is going to be a lot of automation with the profession within the next few decades.But my friend told me that there prolly always be a demand for people with really complicated taxes like billionaires.I think there may be less demand for accountants for the middle class who dont have very complicated income taxes.Also, the top companies tend to prefer those who are straight A accounting grads.Those are just my thoughts.


I've heard the same thing for 40 years, yet the demand for services just continues to increase.

The funny thing about automation: it allows the lawmakers to feel they can create more complex laws, and allows decision makers to ask for more complex data, since the calculations can now be done by computers.

Our tax code is full of examples.

The data management of top companies want is full of examples.

But automation doesn't work without someone who understands the concepts they are working with.

The Big 4 CPA firms tend to hire from the top of recent college grads, but as is true in many industries, smaller firms can't be so picky, so people can gain experience in those. After a few years learning the trade, the same firms that turned people down out of school are paying headhunters to find them. Long run, being good at a job isn't the same as being good in school, and the difference doesn't really show until in the workforce.

In all professions, it is hard to do well if you don't end up having a natural talent for it. "Natural talent" can be a somewhat mysterious mix of skills, so no one is sure they do or don't have it until actually doing the job.

There are many different directions to go in accounting, however. I think most people can find the best match for their unique talents by trying out different specialties, focus sizes, and so on. A few ... should just try a different profession.


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