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tul95
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23 Mar 2012, 4:24 pm

I have autism and aspergers. Soon I am going to be getting my first job. Sooner or later the boss is going to see that some of my little habits are unusual. How do you tell him that your autistic? thanks



Last edited by tul95 on 27 Mar 2012, 4:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

nemorosa
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23 Mar 2012, 4:55 pm

Since you don't really say what your concerns are I'm going to state the obvious, which will apply to everyone whether having aspergers or not: do your work to the best of your ability, be punctual and try to get along with those you work with.



TallyMan
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23 Mar 2012, 5:51 pm

(Thread moved from Autism discussion to Work and finding a job)


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V001
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23 Mar 2012, 7:27 pm

This site has good data
http://www.do2learn.com/JobTIPS/



EarlPurple
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28 Mar 2012, 3:04 am

I think it would really help everyone if people here gave their location by country as the law may vary dependent on where you are.

In the UK you would be protected by the Disability Discrimination Act and the employer will need to make reasonable adjustments for you, but that would only really cover you if you told them of your disability so yes, you should disclose it to them.

It may be a bit early days for this but you should also inform your local area for the autism strategy group or whatever it is called to act as an advocate for you. They should be able to communicate with the employer as you are working there to see how things are going, and communicate back to you too. If there are issues to be addressed, from either side, it would go through this advocate.

The adjustments can often be very minor ones but will make a big difference. Unfortunately I have found employers often make their own "adjustments" without asking you first, which actually involves leaving you rather isolated, not telling you if there's a problem because they're scared of how you will react, and bottling everything up until they just hit you with hundreds of (mostly unjustified) complaints when you never knew anything was wrong, and either let you go or leave you so scarred that you can't work for them effectively.