Social Security Benefit vs Job decision

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FlowingWater
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23 Mar 2012, 7:25 pm

Is social security benefit qualified for someone with austism?

If in the scenerio that you can..... what is your decision? I am thinking about this for a while but cant decide. I have hard time getting a job cause I'm just too damn shy and dont know where to start. I dont know places and I barely drive.

If I was to get social security benefit.... it would ruin my life and self-pride. I want to be strong and dominate this shyness and autism by getting a job but it just too difficult. I know someone that got some kind social security benefits when he was only 19, 20 and he is now living like he hiding from the world..... he told his friends he works ect.... I dont want to be like him but it's been long enough time without income..... what should you do if you have option for social secuirty benefit?



jedaustin
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23 Mar 2012, 7:38 pm

I would choose the job every time.
From the tone of your message I think you would too.
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Ellingtonia
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23 Mar 2012, 8:09 pm

Of course you should "choose the job" but in many cases there isn't a job to choose. In cases like this social security is the only real option.

It sounds to me like your problem isn't with not being able to find a job exactly, but with not knowing how to look. Have you tried job search websites? Newspaper classifieds? Even just dropping resumes off at various stores even if they don't have help wanted signs.



Bloom
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23 Mar 2012, 8:29 pm

Evening,

I can tell you, professionally, autism is not an excluded diagnosis, however, having Asperger's alone will not qualify you for benefits. Many people receiving federal/state benefits are also living with another diagnosis (typically an Axis I/mood disorder). Regardless, this relates an impairment significant enough to preclude you from typical employment. It's a misnomer that those living with benefits don't work - some do.

Personally, I was on federal/state benefits and "used them" to advance my studies far enough that I could get a comfortable job I could choose, rather than be relegated to employment I needed to take. While there are days I wish I could just stay home and hide, I wouldn't give up my job for anything. It's been a struggle, of course, and there are some really difficult days. The benefits, however, exceed my best days "happy" at home, hiding, when I was on benefits.

Every year I grow and learn. Moreover, ever year I become a better advocate for people on the spectrum. Who knew? Me? An advocate? An educator? But... it happened. I took the risk and it was worth it. I hope you choose to take the risk, too.

Do yourself a favor and get "Asperger's on the Job" - I have purchased this book for myself, my co-workers, and my supervisors. I use it to educate. It's a book I wish someone had pointed me to when I was starting... I hope it helps.

_Bloom



Psygirl6
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25 Mar 2012, 5:26 pm

I also live on the benefits. However, I use them to help me be able to live while I am going to school, because I could never work while doing school. Also, the great benefit is that I have a rehabilitation worker, so that when I do get my Associate's in May, I could have help finding a job that I could do and will also provide me accommodations due to the issues I have with my disability. Think of it is a survival need while using it to transition yourself into a better life.



redrobin62
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12 Jun 2012, 3:30 am

Being on the spectrum with my comorbids of avoidant personality disorder and extreme depression probably makes me eligible for SSD. At my age I'd probably just get around $950/month. I'd still work but just not at my old nursing job. I wouldn't mind something a little more easy going, like working in an animal shelter or pet store. I might have to move, though. My current apartment is $850. I suppose if I didn't have to worry about food or meds then the $950 SSD would be okay. Ahh...decisions, decisions. Should I apply? That is the question.



thewhitrbbit
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12 Jun 2012, 7:20 am

In my opinion; you should not be taking benefits unless you truly have no other options.



androbot2084
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12 Jun 2012, 12:37 pm

For me my unemployment insurance was my disability check. But with this rough economy my unemployment insurance is dwindling.



hanyo
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12 Jun 2012, 1:38 pm

I'd take the social security but it sounds like you don't want to do that and would rather work if possible.



jhighl
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12 Jun 2012, 1:42 pm

It sounds like having a job is what you really want. Money isnt everything in the world but it wouldnt hurt to find more information about unemployment.



Wandering_Stranger
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12 Jun 2012, 5:31 pm

I'm in a similar situation. Except, I have other disabilities alongside.



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12 Jun 2012, 8:22 pm

While SSDB(US and non-Ontario provinces) and ODSP are good because you get coverage with them the coverage is very limited and because, as I'd assume that much like ODSP, you're limited to a maximum amount of cash asset you're allowed to have while on it the job is better because you're not limited which means you can build up a saving account.,


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TheHaywire
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23 Jun 2012, 3:14 am

I would not take it.

Aspie's are independent thinkers and nothing feels worse than to be an independent thinker who has to rely on the state. You do not want to be trapped in the system like this unless you have no other option. Have you tried vocational rehab?



thewhitrbbit
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23 Jun 2012, 10:33 am

I think it's offensive someone who could work would take government benefits. There are a lot of people who get up and go to work, deal with a lot of BS, all so they can have tax money taken out to pay these benefits.

Those are for people who truly can't work, and even those people, I wish they were forced to volunteer or something. Everyone should be doing something unless they truly, truly can't do anything.



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27 Jun 2012, 2:14 am

thewhitrbbit wrote:
In my opinion; you should not be taking benefits unless you truly have no other options.


This. And, the majority of people in our society have options, whether or not they choose to take them.



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27 Jun 2012, 2:17 am

thewhitrbbit wrote:
I think it's offensive someone who could work would take government benefits. There are a lot of people who get up and go to work, deal with a lot of BS, all so they can have tax money taken out to pay these benefits.

Those are for people who truly can't work, and even those people, I wish they were forced to volunteer or something. Everyone should be doing something unless they truly, truly can't do anything.


Exactly.

I think a requirement of those under 65 who don't work and collect benefits should be required to volunteer weekly, attend job rehabilitation programs, and submit a certain number of job applications a week. War vets and, say, quadruple amputees and those truly unable to work obviously should be excluded for this requirement. Many of us find it hard to work, but we realize our income = our responsibility = our life and find some way to be responsible for ourselves.

There are way too many people sponging off welfare these days, wasting our tax dollars and their time. It's one thing to accept benefits as a last resort; it's another thing to not even try to work and take responsibility for your own life.



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