Social Security Benefit vs Job decision

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Psygirl6
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29 Jun 2012, 11:05 am

ooo wrote:
thewhitrbbit wrote:
I think it's offensive someone who could work would take government benefits. There are a lot of people who get up and go to work, deal with a lot of BS, all so they can have tax money taken out to pay these benefits.

Those are for people who truly can't work, and even those people, I wish they were forced to volunteer or something. Everyone should be doing something unless they truly, truly can't do anything.


Exactly.

I think a requirement of those under 65 who don't work and collect benefits should be required to volunteer weekly, attend job rehabilitation programs, and submit a certain number of job applications a week. War vets and, say, quadruple amputees and those truly unable to work obviously should be excluded for this requirement. Many of us find it hard to work, but we realize our income = our responsibility = our life and find some way to be responsible for ourselves.

There are way too many people sponging off welfare these days, wasting our tax dollars and their time. It's one thing to accept benefits as a last resort; it's another thing to not even try to work and take responsibility for your own life.


AMEN!! I also think also going to college would be an excellent way to do something. That way they can get a degree in something they are interested in, which would eventually become a great paying job. I am going to college and love it. Job rehabilitation programs where I am suck because they don't find you anything and most for developmental disabilities sit in units all day or ride in vans all day doing nothing. Colleges even have accommodations and many of them even the 4 years have program for people with autism spectrum disorders and other types of disabilities to help them succeed. Plus it is great for the social skills because you meet so many amazing people and develop wonderful friendships.



Psygirl6
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29 Jun 2012, 11:16 am

redrobin62 wrote:
Being on the spectrum with my comorbids of avoidant personality disorder and extreme depression probably makes me eligible for SSD. At my age I'd probably just get around $950/month. I'd still work but just not at my old nursing job. I wouldn't mind something a little more easy going, like working in an animal shelter or pet store. I might have to move, though. My current apartment is $850. I suppose if I didn't have to worry about food or meds then the $950 SSD would be okay. Ahh...decisions, decisions. Should I apply? That is the question.


I have social security and it sucks to live on. I get a total of $750 and that is not enough. In your case you would be definitely broke. I live in section 8 and pay $230 a month, but I also have tons of bills that add up to about $400 a month. Than of course you have to pay for your household supplies, medications, and other "emergency" living expenses which costs me at least $100. Food stamps only give me $160 a month, but I have food intolerance and special diets cost much more, at least $250 or more.
I rather work because think of it this way, I can still stay in my section 8 because of the disability label. As long as I don't make over $36,000 a year I am okay. Example if I made $3000 a month, the most they can charge me is $1000 for a 1 bedroom. Plus with my $400 worth of bills and I would have to pay for my own food, but I would have a lots more spending money for myself. Yes I have tons of taxes taken out of my check, but I would still have more spending money each month.
My leftover money after expenses: social security=$20 , working=heck lot more.



LostInBed
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29 Jun 2012, 9:58 pm

ooo wrote:
thewhitrbbit wrote:
I think it's offensive someone who could work would take government benefits. There are a lot of people who get up and go to work, deal with a lot of BS, all so they can have tax money taken out to pay these benefits.

Those are for people who truly can't work, and even those people, I wish they were forced to volunteer or something. Everyone should be doing something unless they truly, truly can't do anything.


Exactly.

I think a requirement of those under 65 who don't work and collect benefits should be required to volunteer weekly, attend job rehabilitation programs, and submit a certain number of job applications a week. War vets and, say, quadruple amputees and those truly unable to work obviously should be excluded for this requirement. Many of us find it hard to work, but we realize our income = our responsibility = our life and find some way to be responsible for ourselves.

There are way too many people sponging off welfare these days, wasting our tax dollars and their time. It's one thing to accept benefits as a last resort; it's another thing to not even try to work and take responsibility for your own life.



Actually that's where you're wrong. I'm on ODSP which is Ontario's equivalent of America's SSD benefit and I get taxed on my income support benefit just the same as anyone who works for their money does. Being on any sort of government support geared towards the disabled isn't for lack of willingness to work either, it's an interim means of supporting one's self until such time as a job can be secured. Before you go running off your mouths and saying other disabled people are lazy and bilking the tax payers out of their money you might want to look into the purpose of these benefits.


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Psygirl6
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02 Jul 2012, 8:40 am

Actually that's where you're wrong. I'm on ODSP which is Ontario's equivalent of America's SSD benefit and I get taxed on my income support benefit just the same as anyone who works for their money does. Being on any sort of government support geared towards the disabled isn't for lack of willingness to work either, it's an interim means of supporting one's self until such time as a job can be secured. Before you go running off your mouths and saying other disabled people are lazy and bilking the tax payers out of their money you might want to look into the purpose of these benefits.[/quote]

Actually here in the U.S. social security income is not taxed. Also, we are having am issue where there are too many people that are taking advantage of the system, which is why they want to create a reform. Also, where I live in the U.S. there is so many reports of social security abuse it is not even funny.
Even though the purpose of the benefits is supposed to be a hand-up and the person is supposed to commit to getting a vocational assistance and continue going to the doctors and get treated for their conditions. Also, many people are on it because of substance abuse, which they are supposed to be committed to treatment programs. However, many of these people are only followed for only a few months, and are supposed to be trusted. Afterward they stop getting followed, stop going into treatment, and do more drugs. There is too much leniency when it comes to who should get it.
At least, I am trying to use it the correct way, so i can go to school with less stress and eventually get a real job. I wish people, especially ones who are as capable would do the same thing.



AspergianMutantt
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02 Jul 2012, 9:38 am

I was on disability for about a decade, then wanted off because I wanted some pride in my life, not to mention most females wont even look my way while I was on it. in some ways I wish I could get back on it though so to take advantage of the collage grants offered to the disabled and the Medicaid insurance..

In this economy its difficult to survive, and I have major trouble keeping jobs that force me to socially interact. right now I have one that barley keeps me afloat but I don't have to interact with people hardly at all.

My advice would be, if you can manage to get on disability do it, so you can use that time and label to get collage grants and get an education. train in some job field you would enjoy that does not force you to socially interact to much. then once finished drop the disability and make your self proud.



Wandering_Stranger
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02 Jul 2012, 12:00 pm

I have now been signed off sick and am waiting (stupid phone line is engaged) to make a claim.

Don't want to; but need to. I do need to work; but the people who are meant to be helping me, are making my health worse.



Psygirl6
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02 Jul 2012, 6:10 pm

AspergianMutantt wrote:
My advice would be, if you can manage to get on disability do it, so you can use that time and label to get collage grants and get an education. train in some job field you would enjoy that does not force you to socially interact to much. then once finished drop the disability and make your self proud.


Excellent advice. That is what I am doing and it is the best thing for me. It is much better than sitting in a day program that supposed to be for vocational, even though they do not give anyone jobs other than piecework once every two years for not even a month.
College is also great because through the courses, one may find their niche. Also, great for social because of the many activities that tailor to many interests, especially interests of people on the spectrum, like gamers clubs and even anime. I joined a diversity club and have met so many friends.
I want to wish you all good luck with your future endeavours.