Is it a reasonable request to ask for someone’s iq?

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firemonkey
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19 Oct 2021, 6:36 am

Wonderlic?


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Mountain Goat
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19 Oct 2021, 6:40 am

Asking for someones IQ is actually implying that one has a very low IQ and needs someone brighter then oneself to function... Employers are hardly wanting to admit that they have a low IQ by actually asking for someones IQ levels are they? :D

Besides this, my experience over 25 years of being employed in various positions, I can honestly say that in general, those with the highest IQ's are very rarely trustworthy people and I would estimate that 90% of the theft that goes out of businesses ad companies is due to highly intelligent employees finding ways to rob their employers without them realizing what has been done as they are expert at shifting the blame onto others, and when they know they are going to be found out they leave the companies before they get sacked. I have seen these patterns happen time and time again, and still companies will look for the highest intellect to be in charge.
There is also an arrogence to them where they will not listen to important things because they see others as beneathe them.

The railway used to only employ people with degrees. I was one of the few who did not have a degree as I impressed them with my work experience in the way I had worked up through the ranks to become a head of a department and the years of retail experience I had.
They stopped employing people with degrees because they found they would be generally unreliable and they could not hack the job for long and would leave, and it cost them so much per person to train so they had to go down alternative routes. They then refused to employ people with degree status, but the problem they had was that employees had to pas rules exams every two years and they had to get a pass mark of 95% or above with no questions wrong in the safety section of the exam. The average person would struggle to do this. One would get two attempts but if one failed the second attempt one was out of a job and there was nothing ones employer could do if this happened as it was a regulation and out of the employers control.

They eventually discovered that ex. armed forces personel could be found with many having great intelligence who did not have degrees (As they chose a career in the forces instead at an early age) but they did have great discipline to turn up for work on time, were ultra reliable and they could be trusted and happened to be competent enough to pass the railway exams which were set at a very high standard.
They were so successful that if they saw someone from the forces apply they would guarantee to have an interview. Now railway positions average between 7500 and 12,000 applicants per position being advertized.



Fnord
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19 Oct 2021, 8:49 am

Mountain Goat wrote:
... ex armed forces personnel could be found with many having great intelligence who did not have degrees (As they chose a career in the forces instead at an early age) but they did have great discipline to turn up for work on time, were ultra reliable and they could be trusted and happened to be competent enough to pass the railway exams which were set at a very high standard.

They were so successful that if they saw someone from the forces apply they would guarantee to have an interview.  Now railway positions average between 7500 and 12,000 applicants per position being advertised.
This has been my experience as well.  All else being equal, I will make an offer of employment first to honorably-discharged veterans with college degrees, then to non-veteran with the same degrees.  I have never regretted this.



Itendswithmexx
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22 Oct 2021, 10:20 am

Double Retired wrote:
I think asking IQ would only make sense in a rambling conversation with a very close friend or family member.

Asking for it to screen people for any official or semi-official purpose would seem wrong, might be illegal (it is medical info, right?), and would not be useful.

----They might lie.

----Different IQ tests have different standard deviations...you can get a different score from different tests.

----Some "IQ" tests might not be reliable (for instance, one you found and took on the Internet, or in a magazine).

----There are medical reasons a person's IQ might get lower after they have taken a test (for instance, a stroke).

----I can tell you from personal experience this Dilbert cartoon is correct.

----IQ does not equate education, training, talent, integrity, etc.



I think it is considered medical information as it’s you brain. Your iq is like testing your blood for diseases. Mental health is about your feelings, intellectually health is about your brain ability and cognition and it’s functions aka dementia is a brain disorder that destroys brain cells that would contribute to lowering iq. I don’t know why someone would lie about their iq? If they did it would easily be seen as lie when you ask their education and which uni they go to. Oh no I mean those magazine iqs aren’t valid, I mean like everyone has to get a proper iq test by a neuroscientist or educational psychologist like they do for some others jobs you have to get a full psych screening to see if you can handle the job.



Itendswithmexx
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22 Oct 2021, 10:22 am

funeralxempire wrote:
IQ tests are great for demonstrating how well someone does on IQ tests.



Yah and gives a quick idea of what someone is capable of and what category it is. It ain’t the be all end all, just another thing to help to understand a person and I think if an employer is going to bother spending time, money and resources and risk their business on you then they should at least know some information like that.



funeralxempire
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22 Oct 2021, 10:25 am

Itendswithmexx wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
IQ tests are great for demonstrating how well someone does on IQ tests.



Yah and gives a quick idea of what someone is capable of and what category it is. It ain’t the be all end all, just another thing to help to understand a person and I think if an employer is going to bother spending time, money and resources and risk their business on you then they should at least know some information like that.


I'd suggest it's none of their business because they're not doing you a favour by allowing you to generate profit for them.


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Itendswithmexx
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22 Oct 2021, 10:29 am

Fnord wrote:
Mountain Goat wrote:
... ex armed forces personnel could be found with many having great intelligence who did not have degrees (As they chose a career in the forces instead at an early age) but they did have great discipline to turn up for work on time, were ultra reliable and they could be trusted and happened to be competent enough to pass the railway exams which were set at a very high standard.

They were so successful that if they saw someone from the forces apply they would guarantee to have an interview.  Now railway positions average between 7500 and 12,000 applicants per position being advertised.
This has been my experience as well.  All else being equal, I will make an offer of employment first to honorably-discharged veterans with college degrees, then to non-veteran with the same degrees.  I have never regretted this.



Yah that’s nice. Just give them a job don’t let be rapists.



Itendswithmexx
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22 Oct 2021, 10:30 am

firemonkey wrote:
Wonderlic?


What?



Fnord
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22 Oct 2021, 10:39 am

Itendswithmexx wrote:
Fnord wrote:
Mountain Goat wrote:
... ex armed forces personnel could be found with many having great intelligence who did not have degrees (As they chose a career in the forces instead at an early age) but they did have great discipline to turn up for work on time, were ultra reliable and they could be trusted and happened to be competent enough to pass the railway exams which were set at a very high standard.  They were so successful that if they saw someone from the forces apply they would guarantee to have an interview.  Now railway positions average between 7500 and 12,000 applicants per position being advertised.
This has been my experience as well.  All else being equal, I will make an offer of employment first to honorably-discharged veterans with college degrees, then to non-veteran with the same degrees.  I have never regretted this.
Yah that’s nice. Just give them a job don’t let be rapists.
I have never knowingly hired anyone who was convicted of a crime involving theft or violence (including rape).



firemonkey
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22 Oct 2021, 1:37 pm

Itendswithmexx wrote:
firemonkey wrote:
Wonderlic?


What?


As a proxy for IQ measurement?


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naturalplastic
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22 Oct 2021, 1:50 pm

firemonkey wrote:
Itendswithmexx wrote:
firemonkey wrote:
Wonderlic?


What?


As a proxy for IQ measurement?


What is 'Wonderlic'?



naturalplastic
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22 Oct 2021, 1:58 pm

I cant imagine asking that in most conversations with folks. Certainly not dating partners. Its rude. It implies that you think something ill of them (like they must have a low IQ). Most folks wouldnt even know their IQ anyway. Only folks away from mean get tested for it, and would remember it (how high, or how low it is).

Ive never been given the power to hire and fire, but if I did I still cant imagine asking it in a job interview. In most jobs EQ is more important than IQ. High IQ doesnt really correlate with anything good ( and I am a member of Mensa myself- so I am allowed to say that). And two posters above even say it correlates with a certain bad thing (surprised to hear that, but thats what two folks above said).



mohsart
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22 Oct 2021, 2:58 pm

Nobody at any interview I went to asked anything of the sorts.
And when I was on the other side I never did either.
Typical questions to me would be "How do you cooperate with others?", "What would you do if you noticed a conflict?", "How do you deal with stress?"...
I'd typically ask eg "What's the last book you read?", "What do you do in your spare time?", "What kind of music do you like?"...

/Mats


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firemonkey
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22 Oct 2021, 3:26 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
firemonkey wrote:
Itendswithmexx wrote:
firemonkey wrote:
Wonderlic?


What?


As a proxy for IQ measurement?


What is 'Wonderlic'?


Quote:
The Wonderlic Contemporary Cognitive Ability Test (formerly Wonderlic Personnel Test) is an assessment used to measure the cognitive ability and problem-solving aptitude of prospective employees for a range of occupations. It is a proprietary assessment created and distributed by Wonderlic. It consists of 50 multiple choice questions to be answered in 12 minutes.[1][2][3][4] The test was developed by Eldon F. Wonderlic (1909–1980),[5] while he was a graduate student at Northwestern University.[3][6][7] The score is calculated as the number of correct answers given in the allotted time. A score of 20 is intended to indicate average intelligence.[3]




Image

49 with age related bonus. My worst one.


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cyberdad
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22 Oct 2021, 7:53 pm

Itendswithmexx wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
Here in Australia you can't directly measure IQ for getting a job or a place in university.

However, as Fnord mentioned, there are proxy measures that have good concurrent validity to IQ.

e.g. problem solving tasks given as part of a job interview or scores on standardised tests in combination with entry/completion of university degree is usually comparable with IQ.



Yeah but nobody tells what their atar is.


People nowadays tend not to share their politics, religion and ATAR score :lol: