Speech therapy for verbal ASD toddlers which type?

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carlos55
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11 Feb 2019, 12:42 pm

Hi

I don’t know much about speech therapy, just wondering what type (if there is a type) of speech therapy is used with verbal toddlers with ASD?

What I’m getting at is reducing echolalia and boosting Episodic memory skills.

I’m guessing the therapy has many different branches just wondering which one for asd and if there`s any online courses for it?



kraftiekortie
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11 Feb 2019, 1:00 pm

What you mentioned is beyond "speech therapy," though also within it.

This is more along the lines of "occupational therapy."

There's a website known as "Teach Me to Talk," which might offer you some good advice.



carlos55
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11 Feb 2019, 2:38 pm

Maybe just the asd speech therapy?

Im guessing theres different therapy for those who have had part of their tongue removed after cancer.

Need to speak again after a brain injury or just want to speak the queen's english?

Just dont know what type is used on asd toddlers to improve their speech?



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11 Feb 2019, 10:38 pm

carlos55 wrote:
I don’t know much about speech therapy, just wondering what type (if there is a type) of speech therapy is used with verbal toddlers with ASD?

What if I told you these children don't need speech therapy? They are not sick. They need no therapy.

- - -

Because your moniker says "Carlos," I invite you to take a look at these two video clips.

Pablo Pineda: "El Síndrome de Down no se padece, se disfruta"


Down syndrome is not an illness - Pablo Pineda


If you replace "Down Syndrome" with "Autism," Pablo Pineda's message carries over. Namely, autism is not an illness. Autism needs no therapy. Furthermore, autism is not something to suffer from, to suffer with. It's something to enjoy.

Unfortunately, our world is dominated with prejudices from the neurotypical people. As a consequence, most people are brain-washed into believing that autism is a defect/disorder/disability. People once upon a time also believed that the earth was flat.

- - -

Autistic children are perfectly fine the way they are. They are not sick. Our society is sick, and that is the root cause of all the problems. By adopting the point of view that your son "está malito" and needs therapy, you are doing great harm to him. For one thing: you are not treating him as an equal-rights fellow human being. You think you are better than him. Don't do that. Your son is perfectly fine the way he is. Respect him as an equal, for heaven's sake. There is absolutely no problem with him.

The same cannot be said about the adults of our society. There are plenty of problems with the adults in our society. For one thing: they talk too much, and do too little with their hands. To me, as soon as you put a piece of tape over the mouths of the adults, autism is immediately solved. Watch this video and learn to draw pictures.

Why people believe they can’t draw - and how to prove they can | Graham Shaw | TEDxHull


Watch also this 89-year-old lady doing Photoshop. She learned Photoshop at age 72.

There is no age barrier! Creative 88-year old grandmother photographer · Kimiko Nishimoto


Why am I telling all this, when your question was about getting speech therapy for your son? Because, your son doesn't have problems. The problem is on the other side.

Autistic children are born different. They have a different circuitry inside their brains. Baby sea turtles are independent from day one. But we don't raise human babies like baby sea turtles. Similarly, we shouldn't raise autistic children the way we raise neurotypical children. If you raise human babies like baby sea turtles, you would be committing child abuse and would be sent to jail. Interestingly, parents/teachers/psychologists that raise autistic children the way they raise neurotypical children are never punished. Not only that, they often get paid to harm these children.

Don't do that. Communicate to your son visual-manually. Throw away your preconceived notion that your son needs to learn to talk better. Draw pictures for him. Write down words. Communicate with him via picture drawings and written words. Teach him to read early on. These children don't need to be taught to talk: they will teach themselves. You don't need to do anything special to teach them to talk better. However, you need to teach them to read, really early. Frankly, you are already late. Very late, in teaching your son to read.

Both of my children learned to read ... books, when they were still two years old.

I never worried about their speech. They learned to talk around age 4.5. Other parents would be scared to death. I was not. Why? I tell you why. My daughter was able to read cursive at age 2. My son wrote his first Python computer program at age 5. My daughter reading speed has always been at the top of her class, even until today. Both of them are always happy and smiling, every day. I've only had fun with my children being autistic. My wife is neurotypical, but she is the one that tells everybody that, if she had a choice and had to do it all over again, she would still choose to raise autistic children. Why? Because life is just so much more fun!

And don't tell me later that I did not warn you. I've seen all too many cases with my own eyes. When you don't teach your children to read early on, by the time they get into school, they will have double burden. Many of them will have to learn to read, and to talk. By then, they will slur. They will skip words, and commit grammatical errors, both in reading/writing and in talking. They will be behind academically. Many of them won't be able to attend mainstream classes and will have to be sent to special-ed classrooms. And all that disaster comes from ... taking speech therapy classes, instead of learning to read early on!

Autism is not something to suffer from. Autism is something to enjoy. But in order to get there, you need to throw away all your preconceived notions about autism.


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magz
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12 Feb 2019, 5:23 am

I also think you don't need to reduce echolalia in a small child.
It's an alternative way of learning speech.
Nothing wrong with it.


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carlos55
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12 Feb 2019, 12:37 pm

Jason: im not a fan of neuro diversity i believe its just dangerous bs.

Dangerous because it downplays peoples struggles who have more serious ability problems.

We also live in a world where governments with budget constraints are always looking to cut financial assistance / welfare.

Its the perfect trap if autism isnt a problem then no assistance is required. They can go get a job and pay rent like everyone else? and if they dont they end up homeless!

By the way my cousin had down syndrome was non verbal had the mental age of a two year old. He's dead now from a comorbid condition living to the average age down syndrome sufferers live to about 40. Didnt look like he was having fun to me. Also ds sufferers are born infertile, being infertile is not a normal condition for any biological organism ( being gay is not the same thing)

Anyway ill leave you with points of view from other autistic people

https://www.spectator.co.uk/2019/01/the ... found/amp/

https://quillette.com/2017/10/15/proble ... -movement/



magz
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12 Feb 2019, 2:02 pm

I support neurodiversity, I prefer to think of myself as "neurodiverse".
I do acknowledge that some autistic people are severily disabled.
And some are not disabled at all, just weird.
And some are disabled in one society, doing all right in another. AFAIK, Jason is one of them. I would be disabled in Texas because I can't safely drive. But I'm not disabled in Europe where you can rely on public transport.

Not all of the problems of autistic people come from lack of social acceptance - but a lot do.


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eikonabridge
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13 Feb 2019, 12:04 am

magz wrote:
... And some are disabled in one society, doing all right in another. AFAIK, Jason is one of them. ...

Perhaps "disabled" would be too strong a word. I felt more like caged. I had no freedom of thought. I was made to believe I was dumb. At my age, I have looked back, and I have realized that I have always been the smartest kid all along. But, in that kind of toxic environment, I was not allowed to shine. All my potentials were suppressed. I would have perished in my first country. I guess my situation is best described with the word chosen by my daughter: "Overshadowed."


First musical composition by Ivan, at age 8. I asked Ivan what image he had in his mind when he composed the tune, he said "space." So I let him pick up a free space-related image file from the Internet. I asked him for a song title, but it was taking too long for him to come up with one. I then asked Mindy for help. Mindy looked at the picture for a moment, and came up with the name "Overshadowed." Ivan was happy with the title. I asked Mindy about the meaning behind the title, and she explained: "Overshadowed, because autistic people are not being recognized enough." Wow! This little girl surely had a very philosophical understanding about life. I looked at the picture and it all made sense: autistic people are like the bright light behind the shadow, but often are not given the right opportunities or path of development.


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carlos55
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13 Feb 2019, 8:54 am

The videos were interesting and the points they raise.

I support the rights of those who have disabilities and like most am happy to see them overcome then to acheive great things like in the para olympics for example.

I just feel neuro diversity goes a step too far in trying to block science research that has the potential to help people ( humaine medical research should never be blocked ).

Also theres the trap of "over abling" disabilities in the public perception regardless of the reality. Here in the UK thousands of disabled people on welfare have committed suicide after being poorly assessed fit to work then have had all their financial assistance taken away.

Its a double edged sword where the autistic community need to tread carefuly. Many in power and authority would like nothing beter than to be told they no longer have to keep to their moral / financial obligations....



Daddy63
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13 Feb 2019, 10:45 am

carlos55 wrote:
Jason: im not a fan of neuro diversity i believe its just dangerous bs.

Dangerous because it downplays peoples struggles who have more serious ability problems.

We also live in a world where governments with budget constraints are always looking to cut financial assistance / welfare.

Its the perfect trap if autism isnt a problem then no assistance is required. They can go get a job and pay rent like everyone else? and if they dont they end up homeless!/


You don't understand Jason. He's not saying at all that ASD kids don't need any help. He is saying the opposite but that the kind of help we are giving to our ASD children (like extensive speech therapy) is not always the right kind of help that they need.

We know that our ASD young children and toddlers of normal intelligence typically learn first with their eyes and not their ears. Many at the age of 2-6 are highly intelligent but simply are not ready to learn verbally. The question should be why is it that our professional medical community believes we must force them to learn verbally? When they are hit hard with repetitive speech therapy sessions they become confused which leads to frustration and can cause behavioral problems. The behavioral issues get worse and then they end up in behavioral therapy which is typically verbally based. They become more confused and the behavior issue get worse instead of better.

The only significant help a speech therapist ever provided for my son was after he could already speak and read. He was 6 and a speech therapist worked with him on grammar issues like subject and object pronouns. This was done with pictures and reading combined with verbal elements. He responded well and quickly caught up with his peers.

At 3, he would cry and get stressed in front of a speech therapist. It made things worse instead of better. We changed things and started teaching him visually. We focused on object identification, letters, numbers and quickly words and reading. By 4.5 yo his reading comprehension was way higher than his verbal comprehension. He started kindergarten at 6 and his teacher made sure he had written instructions for all activities. It eliminated a lot of stress for him.

I would caution anyone regarding speech therapy if the child is not already communicating some verbally and especially if the child is stressed and confused when someone communicates with them verbally.



carlos55
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14 Feb 2019, 10:58 am

Ive taken on board the advice on speech therapy and especially the reading.

My son already knows all his letters and their pronouciations since about 2. I held back on the reading as didnt think he was ready but will go for it now



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02 Sep 2019, 4:32 am

I've replied to carlos55's concerns about the neurodiversity paradigm in a separate thread here.


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04 Sep 2019, 2:28 pm

My ASD son considered speech therapy to have been one of the most valuable and fun things he did (occupational therapy that taught him to type being number 1, and a group therapy being high up there, as well). For him, speech therapy started in second grade and was generally focused on pragmatic speech. In other words, how to get the people around you to understand and want to listen to what you are trying to say. Given that my son is a talker that is driven to being center stage, communicating effectively was and is really important to him. A big part of the therapy was supervised lunch bunch which used real life social situations with friends as social skills communication practice. He got to bring a friend to play board games at lunch time. He LOVED it.

It was never about changing the child. It was about helping the child achieve his goals when interacting with other people. THAT is what good speech therapy is about.

With all therapy you have to understand what the goals will be, how the goals will be approached, and whether or not that aligns with what your child wants to accomplish. My son was a part of every decision made. We weren't even thinking about intervention when he was in preschool because we didn't know he was ASD. For us, I am glad we weren't because it allowed our son to develop at his own pace and bond with us in his own unique way before facing the realities of a more structured and cookie cutter world. I know people constantly talk about early intervention being key, but it really depends on exactly what intervention you are talking about and what it is your unique child needs.

I won't discount the concept of therapy, however. Like it or not our kids will have to thrive in an outside world that has certain expectations. The key IMHO is getting the right therapy, and having a child that chooses to engage.


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04 Sep 2019, 9:30 pm

If my parents discouraged my echolalia, I would have NEVER learned to speak.


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07 Sep 2019, 7:32 pm

Hi Carlos, 2 of my 3 HFA children required speech therapy. I too am in the UK, and my youngest was given free speech therapy at the age of 4/5 yrs, at East Surrey Hospital. I have a background in the disability field, and like the idea of bathing children in books, so to speak, from a very young age. Part of the speech therapy included making our own books, playing a game called Race to the Roof(highly recommended), as well as using large word/picture cards. If you don’t mind me sharing a word on Echolalia .... from my experience of over 30 years in the field, Echolalia is meaningful communication and easily translated if you look at the total context in which they’re uttered. Always best not to take echolalic statements at face value, and perceiving them as meaningless. For example, a young boy who started demanding a biscuit when strangers(to him, at least), arrived at his home during school holidays. They were nit meant to be there, from his perspective, and he drifted off his chosen task of watching Postman Pat in TV and became agitated, all the while demanding “Milky Way biscuit”. His mother correctly waited for him to be relatively quiet and then directed him back to the task he was meant to be doing. “You’re meant to be sitting on the couch, watching Postman Pat” in a calm and pleasant voice. Now, demanding a milky way biscuit actually meant “I am anxious, make me safe, Mum!” Why? Because he associates his mother(as his primary carer in the family) with food, safety and so on. This low functioning young boy has no insight into his emotions and can not describe what he feels directly, but still feels anxious. Hence, he throws out “milky way biscuit” as a way of getting his mother’s securing attention. [He would happily eat a biscuit too, but that is a secondary issue.] in this case, it’s delayed echolalia, but still functional communication from his perspective. To focus on the biscuit is to miss the point. In most cases, one has to look at the background/setting issues to get the “hidden” message in the echolalia. Many echolalic utterances will be about safety and security from the autistic person’s perspective.