Kids do not speak at the age of 3

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costalacosta
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20 Nov 2020, 1:45 pm

Good afternoon. I want to ask for any kind of advice or recommendation. My son is already 3 and he still does not speak. He makes some sounds but they are not similar to any words. We had a consultation with a specialist and a psychologist. They recommended me to bring him to a daycare where he will be among his peers. I am worried about it. Firstly, because of a misunderstanding. I know kids can be rude to each other. Secondly, because of the pandemic time. I do not know what to do. They also recommended me one of the daycare centers in Brooklyn, called Little Scholars childcare center, where qualified specialists work and probably they could help him. He does not have any health issues.



magz
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20 Nov 2020, 1:52 pm

Does your son communicate any other way, e.g. pointing to things?
Some children just learn to speak late.


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kraftiekortie
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20 Nov 2020, 2:27 pm

Magz brings up a good point.

Does he seem to UNDERSTAND you when you talk to him?

I didn't talk until I was 5 1/2 years old. And now they can't shut me up :P



timf
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21 Nov 2020, 1:19 pm

My wife used ASL (American Sign Language) with our kids before they were able to verbalize.

You may want to experiment with other communication modes such as whistling, making popping noises, humming, or even animal sounds. It can be fun and entertaining for a child and also may encourage him to make similar sound attempts.

If he is alert and interactive in other ways,the delayed speech may not prove to be that significant.



jimmy m
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21 Nov 2020, 5:24 pm

How is his hearing? Boys tend to develop language skills a little later than girls.

[Years ago, I had a puppy, a Boxer, who I tried for several years to teach commands. And the dog never listened. The dog was all white. Someone mentioned that all white boxers tend to be deaf. And that turned out to be the case with this dog. Afterwards I taught it a few commands using a type of sign language.]


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costalacosta
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24 Nov 2020, 2:46 pm

Good afternoon! Yes, he does hear and understand me. We went to that Little Scholars childcare center in Brooklyn yesterday. They told us it is a normal situation. He is a boy and the boys develop language skills later than girls as you have also mentioned. He pronounced some sound, but it is impossible to understand what he mentions. He even sings the songs in his language. So, the daycare providers said he should better be among other kids, and their child's early education program will help him as well.I hope so.



Redd_Kross
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24 Nov 2020, 3:46 pm

costalacosta wrote:
Good afternoon! Yes, he does hear and understand me. We went to that Little Scholars childcare center in Brooklyn yesterday. They told us it is a normal situation. He is a boy and the boys develop language skills later than girls as you have also mentioned. He pronounced some sound, but it is impossible to understand what he mentions. He even sings the songs in his language. So, the daycare providers said he should better be among other kids, and their child's early education program will help him as well.I hope so.

That sounds good.

I appreciate the Aspie-ness of the name "Little Scholars", too (without making any assumptions about your son).