RE: Kids w/ Classic Autism, PDD-NOS & Speech Delays

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cyberdad
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01 Aug 2016, 2:15 am

nostromo wrote:
Today out of the blue while with my mother my son looked at his shoe and said "Shoe".

Given that it's seven years since he last uttered a word, thats quite something. Unfortunately I didn't get to hear it and no amount of coaxing him will get him to say it or anything else again.


If you are lucky to hear him again keep a tape recorder handy. My daughter went through a phase where she loved listening to the sound of her own voice and it got her to read more...



Bkdad82
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01 Aug 2016, 10:23 am

Just wanted to say hi to parents on this thread. My experience has been frustrating because most of the parents at autism gatherings events and message boards have high functioning kids with language and I don't identify with them. Many of the therapist that come to our home are clueless as to how to deal with our son. My kid is almost 4 and has little to no language. He has classic autism and adhd and resists any direction from others. When we try to get him to do things he cries and tries to escape and we know we need to work through it but we get plenty of stares. I remember going to an autism bbq where kids were playing baseball and waiting in line for hotdogs. My kid was busy observing the fan and we got him to get into the bounce house there was a line and we were told he needs to take off his shoes. It's as if we were at the wrong event. No other kid had to be restrained to take off their shoes. Even in his classroom (6-4 ratio) most kids are calm and sit for lessons while ours is running around. My point is that classic autism is its own world and being considered part of the spectrum makes parents like me isolated. To my eyes most of the high functioning kids are perfectly fine. Anyway just wanted to say hi to parents who go through he same thing.



cyberdad
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01 Aug 2016, 8:11 pm

Hi Bkdad82!

Bkdad82 wrote:
Just wanted to say hi to parents on this thread. My experience has been frustrating because most of the parents at autism gatherings events and message boards have high functioning kids with language and I don't identify with them. Many of the therapist that come to our home are clueless as to how to deal with our son. My kid is almost 4 and has little to no language. He has classic autism and adhd and resists any direction from others


Welcome to our world!

Not sure if you are passing through but there are plenty of parents in your shoes. Feel free to share anytime as there are other parents here who can pass on tips. My only advice (and others might have sons in your age group) is to be patient but keep persisting with getting him to practice his shoe laces, speaking and socialising. Also pay no regard to other families children and their specific milestones as everybody's child is going to be different anyway...



nostromo
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01 Aug 2016, 8:28 pm

Yeah welcome Bkdad82 and we get you. I said a few years back in relation to my sons type of Autism that even being on this Wrongplanet website for me seems less like being on the Wrongplanet, but more like a strange moon orbiting that planet.
I take my son to an Autism holiday programme. Its really well run and staffed, but the thing that used to strike me was the differences in the kids. My son is non verbal and spends his time outside spinning straws and ignoring people. Other kids there are coming up to me and showing me magic tricks or trying to tell me about the mechanism behind cloud formations.

If I could give one piece of advice looking back on how things have gone for us, it would be to be gentle and patient with your son. It's gotta be a strange and scary world for him.
And try not to worry too much, he will develop though it will just be at a different pace and trajectory from 'typical' kids.



subhanrukh
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11 Oct 2016, 9:40 pm

Hi all,

my son has a lot of regression. He was 18 months (last oct 2015) picking up everything you can think of and some. At the current point he's 2 and a half and has lost most speech. he just wants to climb things all day, and gets happy at making circles. He also doesn't like company at all. Has anyone had similar experience if not similar close to mine? can you tell where you are now and what helped and didn't?

thanks

ps. if you need more info let me know.



cyberdad
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13 Oct 2016, 7:20 pm

Hi Subhanrukh

My daughter had a regression around 3-4 yrs but up to then she was developing normally (perhaps weren't looking closely enough?)

It doesn't sound like he has behavioral problems so ABA may not be necessary. At his age physical play should be encouraged (as with any child up to 6) as that's more important than academic learning. Let him enjoy climbing and engaging in physical activity.

Don't worry too much about the loss of speech as many children develop later in childhood or adolescence. If you are worried then engage a speech therapist to work with him but he is still quite young and has lots of growing to do.

I realise boys and girls develop differently so perhaps another poster here with a boy could give you their perspective/experiences.



father
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22 Oct 2016, 12:05 pm

The same thing, ASD. Get ABA therapy in most deficits, try the regular classroom see how it works,it's AN marathon,take every day at at time.don't think of what,when,where ,that will just drain yu FR nothing.with the right therapy and home love (very imp) ,he'll develop to yr amazement ,these kids have no limits,they ar all different and no one would know how far they develop,most of them come to be amazingly well snd social and verbal VRY good just hold on.



nostromo
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21 Jan 2017, 5:33 am

Bump. My boy is 10 now, how time flies.
Working on him independantly dressing himself and getting him to help with little tasks around the house such as hand me a few items when we are hanging out the washing, little things like that.

If nothing it keeps him engaged and places demands on him. Keep that expectation there..



cyberdad
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22 Jan 2017, 4:44 am

nostromo wrote:
Bump. My boy is 10 now, how time flies.
Working on him independantly dressing himself and getting him to help with little tasks around the house such as hand me a few items when we are hanging out the washing, little things like that.

If nothing it keeps him engaged and places demands on him. Keep that expectation there..

Happy birthday to your son Nostromo :)



nostromo
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12 Jun 2017, 2:59 am

cyberdad wrote:
nostromo wrote:
Bump. My boy is 10 now, how time flies.
Working on him independantly dressing himself and getting him to help with little tasks around the house such as hand me a few items when we are hanging out the washing, little things like that.

If nothing it keeps him engaged and places demands on him. Keep that expectation there..

Happy birthday to your son Nostromo :)

Thanks. Just noticed this now :-D Hope you and your daughter are well Cyberdad..



cyberdad
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12 Jun 2017, 3:47 am

Hi Nostromo

Entering new territory which is picking a new highschool

I guess you'll be following this same journey soon!! :|

No idea what to do??



nostromo
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12 Jun 2017, 5:34 pm

Yeah, next year James has to go to Intermediate so yes gotta pick a new school. We are very happy with the current school he is at and he likes it there too, but he's getting to the age where he needs to move on up so we have all that to deal with..



cyberdad
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13 Jun 2017, 2:05 am

Yes my daughter is loving her current primary school but we have no idea how she is going to cope with mainstream highschool?

Highschool students are like young versions of adults, my daughter is going to face a lot of new challenges



CharityGoodyGrace
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16 Jul 2017, 2:31 am

I'm not a kid per se, but I think I have PDD-NOS, not anything else, like AS or anything. I like it better as that, or, as it's often called, atypical autism, because there are no or few stereotypes people have about this label because it isn't really a label.



cyberdad
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16 Jul 2017, 11:05 pm

CharityGoodyGrace wrote:
I'm not a kid per se, but I think I have PDD-NOS, not anything else, like AS or anything. I like it better as that, or, as it's often called, atypical autism, because there are no or few stereotypes people have about this label because it isn't really a label.

As far as I know you are the first person with PDD-NOS to post on this thread so welcome aboard :)