Help! Having problem with reg. classroom teacher.

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Endersdragon
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24 Oct 2005, 2:30 pm

Pandora wrote:
I think it is child abuse for a teacher to grab a child by the arm and make them say good morning. If I were the child, I'd be mentally wishing them a very bad morning and a bad day and a bad week and so on.

There is so much in the press now about teachers not even being supposed to touch a child to comfort them if they've hurt themselves at school so I don't see how this person can justify getting away with being so pushy and horrible.


In addition to what LJ said my 2nd grade teacher (notice lil kids in the class) would yell at the class (rarely me, but occosionally) so loud that my mom said she heard her before from the front of the school which would have to be 75-100 feet away threw a closed door, thankfully she went to teach somewhere else like a year or two after I got done with her. At other times I was accused of doing wrong things because I was stimming (and they saw that as a guilty tic.) So the moral of the story is most teachers are idiots :) .


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irishmic
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25 Oct 2005, 12:25 am

Hey, I resent that.
I work in education, and I am not an idiot, I'm an aspie who worked out his control issues before reentering the classroom. I do see such behavior every day though. So, let's say that some adults working in educational environments have serious personal issues that lead to control issues.
These people should consult psycological help before they take it out on their students and/or assistants. Those engaged should be forced to.



julieme
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28 Oct 2005, 10:19 pm

If all else fails --- bite the teacher. It really gets their attention. After a few bites the teacher may modify her behavior.

If that is not your style --- demand another teacher.



beentheredonethat
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01 Nov 2005, 7:20 pm

I don't care where you live, there are laws against what I hear you saying in your post (not against what you're trying to do, what they're trying to do). I don't think I can post a book on this site, so I won't, but do a google search on Erika Hammerschmidt. She's got a couple of chapters on what the school system tried to do to her....and how her mother stopped it.



jbrawn26
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02 Nov 2005, 6:52 pm

not sure if this will help or not but I requested at the last iep meeting that the book "this is asperger syndrome" be read to my son's classroom by the teacher even though he is only in the classroom part of the day and does not go a full day. It helps people to better understand the disorder a little bit and is geared toward helping the children understand better as well.



Meylaran
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03 Nov 2005, 3:18 pm

Hi, I'm new around here, but our biggest fights come with the school system. I sympathize with all of you!! ! Just this year, we went into a regular classroom & have had nothing but problems. My son is in 1st grade this year. He attends year-round school, which was the best choice for us. After his diagnosis (which on his IEP is Mild Autism) we were able to choose what school to go to. There were like 3 with programs for developmental disabilties. We chose the year-round school. His Kindergarten year he started out in a special education classroom. After the 1st 9 weeks, he started going into a reg classroom for half the day. He did so well!! Things started looking up. Well, this year we went full-time in a reg room with an inclusion teacher.

The teacher he has now, I speculate, has little to no experience with special needs kids. I constantly print out articles & send them to her to read. It just seems that the school system is out to do what will make their lives easier...well, I'm there to remind them that it's not about them...it's about the child. I'm also there to campout on their doorstep until things get done. We are re-working my son's IEP right now to suit him better. My son has no idea there is anything wrong with him. We've not told him. Actually, it is my belief that we are all different & that's what makes us all special; the differences. It wouldn't be very interesting if we were all the same...

I know I'm going on & on, but this is the first place I have found that I can relate to the people! So many people don't understand what we go through. They are quick to judge that we've done something wrong as parents. Learn now to develop a thick skin. Don't be bothered by stepping on toes or hurting feelings. I am only now finding that place myself. I have always been one not to "rock the boat" either.

You say you have heard from other people things this teacher has said about your son????? HMMMM....I don't think she is supposed to be discussing your son with anyone except you & the people involved with his IEP. I had a parent once mention to me that they knew some things they probably shouldn't have known. I know that day they realized that they grabbed the wrong bull by the horns. Our business is ours, no one elses, unless WE choose to make it so. There is so much more I want to say about school...

I guess, the thing most on mind right now is...we got our first report card yesterday...*sigh* I am struggling with the fact that my son got a "C" in conduct and a "minus" in "Practicing self-control". I'm not sure how to approach this, but, I just think that his disorder should be taken into consideration & I don't think it was...my husband says that he thinks it was because if it wasn't that conduct grade would probably be an "F"....oh, well....so much to say, so little time!

Nice to meet everyone! Blessings to you all!

Lela



chringram
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12 Nov 2005, 10:08 am

GRAB THE BULL BY THE HORNS!! The previous post said it right! You are your child's ONLY advocate! The school will not help you out they will protect themselves and do only what the least amount that they feel they are required to do. What you have witnessed is DISCRIMINATION AGAINST YOUR CHILD, which is against federal law. Our children who have disabilities are protected by the American Disabilities Act and if schools are found in non-compliance their school district could lose all federal funding. Los Angeles Unified School District (where my kid currently is, unfortunately) was found in non-compliance a few years back and has been struggling to get back in line.

OUR STORY:
We were informed through Chandler's first grade that if his writing didn't improve that he would have difficulty getting through 2nd or any other grade, even though his CAT 6 scores placed him in the top 1% of the country in both reading and math, and his IEP scoring his reading and math at grade levels far beyond his own.

We found a specialist in Colorado (MA, Licensed HCP) who gave us lots of techniques and training to work with our son through the summer. The exercises includes gross and fine motor skills which focused on right brain / left brain integration. Fast forward to the first week in 2nd grade and he turns in his first spelling test where his handwriting is the best we'd ever seen. Two weeks later in this class, his handwriting is spaghetti again and he's screaming that he can't 'DO' math anymore (which we come to find that conceptually he gets it, but the teaching method he doesn't get and because he can't do it the WAY HE'S SUPPOSED TO he's unable to complete the homework). We ask to move him to a different class.

Here we are a couple of months later, he's still with the same teacher and we've filed a 'DUE PROCESS' letter with the school district through our attorney. Our first informal hearing with the school administrator, occupational therapist, and teacher proved that the teacher is still 'clueless' about our son's condition; at the end of the hour meeting after we explain that our son needs more time for writing assignments etc, as one of the many 'ACCOMODATIONS' that the school must provide, she hands me a form saying that his writing is not up to standards. She explains to me that he is refusing to write lengthy sentences as they are doing paragraphs now.

And our son's self esteem is being crushed! We would like to find a 'mainstream' school or school district that recognizes the disabilities rather than discriminating against it.

HELP APPRECIATED: Does anyone know the Los Angeles Area school districts? How about the non-public schools list in the distrcit? What's worked well for you??

Thanks,
Chris & Dina (Chandler's Daddy & Mommy)