BLM controversial statement about Cuban Unrest

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ASPartOfMe
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16 Jul 2021, 4:25 am

Black Lives Matter under fire for controversial statement defending Cuban regime

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Black Lives Matter is facing fierce criticism on social media for defending the Cuban government and blaming the antigovernment protests on the U.S.

On Wednesday night, Black Lives Matter issued a statement saying Cuba's troubles were a result of the U.S. embargo, calling it "a cruel and inhumane policy" that was "instituted with the explicit intention of destabilizing the country and undermining Cubans' right to choose their own government."

The organization has also been critical of a double standard when it comes to enforcing Florida's new "anti-riot" law, which was passed in response to last summer's demonstrations following the death of George Floyd.

Many have questioned why the law wasn't applied to demonstrators in South Florida who protested in solidarity with protesters on the island.

However, two men arrested in the Tampa area during an antigovernment protest are being held on charges related to the state's new anti-riot law.

The organization's statement also implies that Cuba always helped African freedom fighters and civil rights movements.

“Cuba has historically demonstrated solidarity with oppressed peoples of African descent, from protecting Black revolutionaries like Assata Shakur through granting her asylum, to supporting Black liberation struggled in Angola, Mozambique, Guinea Bissau and South Africa,” the statement reads.

Shakur, a former Black Liberation Army member who is still wanted by the FBI, escaped from prison in 1979 and fled the U.S. after she was convicted for the murder a New Jersey state trooper.

The organization cited the U.S. embargo as the reason why the Cuban government was unable to handle the COVID-19 pandemic and is calling on President Joe Biden to lift sanctions.

Remember folks BLM’s “Marxism” is nothing but a smokescreen to deflect from your privileged racism. And that part about supporting Shakur must have been snuck in by an overzealous staffer since BLM is about mostly peaceful protests.


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16 Jul 2021, 9:09 am

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Black Lives Matter under fire for controversial statement defending Cuban regime. [...]
And well they should be!  Defending Communism make them Communists by proxy.


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funeralxempire
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16 Jul 2021, 2:39 pm

Quote:
On Wednesday night, Black Lives Matter issued a statement saying Cuba's troubles were a result of the U.S. embargo, calling it "a cruel and inhumane policy" that was "instituted with the explicit intention of destabilizing the country and undermining Cubans' right to choose their own government."


How exactly is that inaccurate?

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The organization's statement also implies that Cuba always helped African freedom fighters and civil rights movements.

“Cuba has historically demonstrated solidarity with oppressed peoples of African descent, from protecting Black revolutionaries like Assata Shakur through granting her asylum, to supporting Black liberation struggled in Angola, Mozambique, Guinea Bissau and South Africa,” the statement reads.

Shakur, a former Black Liberation Army member who is still wanted by the FBI, escaped from prison in 1979 and fled the U.S. after she was convicted for the murder a New Jersey state trooper.


Again, this is also accurate.


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16 Jul 2021, 2:55 pm

I don't get how this is "defending" anything. It's been known for a long time that the U.S. has put a lot of effort into destabilizing the countries in and around South America. Pointing that out doesn't "defend" anything.


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16 Jul 2021, 8:19 pm

It doesn't strike me as a controversial or outlandish statement. The US embargo on Cuba is a fact, I gather it's somewhat effective, and it would be surprising if it didn't hamper Cuba's efforts to deal with Covid in some way or other. Maybe some people think BLM should confine their comments to racism, but personally I wouldn't support any movement based on equality if it only applied the principle to its own main function. I wouldn't support any branch of trade unionism that had no interest in helping women as much as it helped men, and I wouldn't support any branch of feminism that was happy to see class inequality continue. All these egalitarian things are linked and I don't like to see one self-interested group use the moral standard of parity to benefit just itself.



The_Walrus
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18 Jul 2021, 2:58 pm

funeralxempire wrote:
Quote:
On Wednesday night, Black Lives Matter issued a statement saying Cuba's troubles were a result of the U.S. embargo, calling it "a cruel and inhumane policy" that was "instituted with the explicit intention of destabilizing the country and undermining Cubans' right to choose their own government."


How exactly is that inaccurate?

Quote:
The organization's statement also implies that Cuba always helped African freedom fighters and civil rights movements.

“Cuba has historically demonstrated solidarity with oppressed peoples of African descent, from protecting Black revolutionaries like Assata Shakur through granting her asylum, to supporting Black liberation struggled in Angola, Mozambique, Guinea Bissau and South Africa,” the statement reads.

Shakur, a former Black Liberation Army member who is still wanted by the FBI, escaped from prison in 1979 and fled the U.S. after she was convicted for the murder a New Jersey state trooper.


Again, this is also accurate.

It’s inaccurate to say that Cuba’s troubles are the result of the trade embargo. Cuba’s troubles are because it has an authoritarian government with no respect for human rights that has dedicated decades to suppressing the people. The protesters are not protesting poverty (which could be blamed on the embargo, but is also down to poor governance), they are protesting against the government repression.

It’s pretty disheartening to see people who talk a lot of sense about the domestic failings of the Trump administration turn around and praise the Cuban government because it is notionally “leftist”.

Here’s Human Rights Watch’s report on Cuba, see if it’s anything you would like to defend: https://www.hrw.org/world-report/2021/c ... pters/cuba

The Cuban protestors have mentioned that the government has not provided adequate food and medicine. The Us trade embargo has not covered humanitarian supplies, including food and medicine, since 2000.

BLM says that Cubans have chosen their government. This is plainly inaccurate. Cuba has not held contested elections since 1948. It would be fair to criticise the US-backed coup that overthrew Carlos Prio. That does not justify the Castro regime, which has failed to live up to the standards of the 1940s.

Finally, glorifying Assata Shakur is a very bad take. She organised a string of armed robberies and murders of police officers. She was imprisoned after she shot a police officer who pulled over a car she was in for speeding. She escaped from prison with the help of an armed gang who held hostages at gun point. No sane person would use Cuba sheltering a murderer as a point in its defence.

Make no mistake about it - this is a bad statement by BLM which compromises their credibility. I think for many people this will be the straw that causes them to say “I think black lives matter but I don’t support Black Lives Matter”.



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18 Jul 2021, 3:21 pm

Didn’t we end the embargo?


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ToughDiamond
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18 Jul 2021, 3:46 pm

Tim_Tex wrote:
Didn’t we end the embargo?

I don't think so. I think Obama eased it off a little, and then Trump put it back much the way it was. I don't know if Biden has done anything one way or the other. I suspect he's done very little.



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18 Jul 2021, 4:06 pm

Obama eased the travel ban, making allowances for certain people. But I don't think he ever lifted the trade embargo to any degree.


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ASPartOfMe
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18 Jul 2021, 6:55 pm

The_Walrus wrote:
Make no mistake about it - this is a bad statement by BLM which compromises their credibility. I think for many people this will be the straw that causes them to say “I think black lives matter but I don’t support Black Lives Matter”.

While I wish this were true all this did was give a reason for people like me to say "I told you so". Like with the mansions one of the founders of BLM owned outside of the usual suspects it is a one-day story put behind the main stories. The inevitable next video of a cop abusing or killing a black suspect will be anything but a one-day story. If a picture is worth a thousand words how many words is a video worth? "Black Lives Matter" is such a powerful expression anybody arguing against BLM is put on the defensive by the question "How can anybody be against black lives mattering". Of course, the question is rhetorical the "obvious" answer is "only a racist". The critic of BLM is owned.


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19 Jul 2021, 8:30 am

ToughDiamond wrote:
Tim_Tex wrote:
Didn’t we end the embargo?

I don't think so. I think Obama eased it off a little, and then Trump put it back much the way it was. I don't know if Biden has done anything one way or the other. I suspect he's done very little.

Clinton allowed humanitarian supplies to get through and no subsequent president has reversed that.

Obama normalised relations to an extent by lifting travel restrictions, removing restrictions on remittances (sending money to Cuban relatives), increasing financial links, reopening embassies, and removing Cuba from the list of state sponsors of terrorism.

Trump reimposed some travel restrictions and put sanctions on state-owned businesses.

The embargo is under the power of Congress. Obama called for it to be lifted but McConnell and Ryan didn’t take him up on that.



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20 Jul 2021, 8:31 am

Nicole Hannah Jones said Cuba is one of the “most equal” countries for socialism

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In a podcast, 1619 project writer Nicole Hannah Jones said she believed that Cuba was the most equal country in the Western Hemisphere and could serve as a model for its integrated agenda.

In a 2019 podcast by Vox’s Ezra Klein and The New York Times, Hannah-Jones was asked if there were any candidates or places she thought had a “feasible and sufficiently ambitious integration agenda.” ..

Hannah Jones, who is not an international racial expert, believes that the most “equal” and “multi-ethnic” country in the Western Hemisphere is Cuba, arguing that it is due to socialism.

“The most equal multi-ethnic country in our hemisphere, it would be Cuba,” Hannah Jones said as reported by the publication. “Cuba actually has the least inequality between blacks and whites anywhere in the hemisphere, which means that the Caribbean, most of the Caribbean, counts because the population of many whites in these countries is very small. Difficult. These countries are run by blacks, but in places that are truly interracial countries, Cuba is actually the least inequality, and it is largely due to socialism. I’m sure no one wants to hear it. “

As reported by the National Pulse, Hannah Jones also wrote an editorial published by The Oregonian posted in 2008, where she was often overlooked in countries with very high literacy rates, low HIV. The infection rate and the “model” universal health insurance system said it had some success.

In the article, she also wrote that the Cuban Revolution led to the “end of systematic racism” and provided access to universal education and work for black Cubans.


Racism in Cuba - Wikipedia
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According to Voyages – The Transatlantic Slave Trade Database, about 900,000 Africans were brought to Cuba as slaves. To compare, some 470,000 Africans were brought to what is now the United States, and 5,500,000 to the much vaster region of what is now Brazil.

As slavery was abolished or restricted in other areas of the Americas during the 19th century, the Cuban slave trade grew dramatically. Just between 1790 and 1820, 325,000 Africans were brought to Cuba, quadruple the number from the people brought in the last 30 years.The abolition of slavery was a gradual process that began during the first war for independence.

The revolution of 1959 changed race relations drastically. Institutionally speaking, Cubans of Color benefited disproportionately from revolutionary reform. After the overthrow of the Batista regime, Fidel Castro established racism as one of the central battles of the revolution.Though Cuba never had formal, state sanctioned segregation, privatization disenfranchised Cubans of color specifically. Previously white only private pools, beaches, and schools were made public, free, and opened up to Cubans of all races and classes. Because much of the Afro-Cuban population on the island was impoverished before the revolution, they benefited widely from the policies for affordable housing, the literacy program, universal free education in general, and healthcare. But above all, Castro insisted that the greatest obstacle for Cubans of color was access to employment. By the mid 1980s racial inequality on paper was virtually nonexistent. Cubans of color graduated at the same (or higher) rate as white Cubans. The races had an equal life expectancy and were equally represented in the professional arena.

There is heavy debate today on how the 1959 revolution impacted race relations on the island. Overall, the debate of racism in Cuba typically takes one of two extremes. Either the revolution ended racism, or it exacerbated or even created racial tension on the island. Many scholars of race in Cuba take a far more qualifying position that while the revolution helped Afro-Cubans, it also halted any further racial progress beyond institutionalization.

Typically the proponents of the elimination of racism position are close to the revolutionary government, supportive of the revolution in total, and/or come from an older generation of Cubans that are more familiar with pre-revolutionary racism. They argue that the dismantling of economic class through socialism destroyed the material perpetuation of racism.In 1966, Castro himself said that, “Discrimination disappeared when class privileges disappeared."Castro also often compared the anti-racism of Cuba to the United States' segregation, and labeled Cuba as a "Afro-Latin" nation when justifying anti-imperial support to liberation fronts in Africa.

Many who argue that Cuba is not racist base their claims on the idea of Latin American Exceptionalism. According to this argument, a social history of intermarriage and mixing of the races is unique to Latin America. The large mestizo populations that result from high levels of interracial union common to the region are often linked to racial democracy. For many Cubans this translates into an argument of "racial harmony," often referred to as racial democracy. According to Mark Q. Sawyer, in the case of Cuba, ideas of Latin American Exceptionalism have delayed the progress of true racial harmony.

While many opponents of the revolution, such as Cuban emigrants, argue that Castro created race problems on the island, the most common claim for the exacerbation of racism is the revolution's inability to accept Afro-Cubans who want to claim a black identity.After 1961, it was simply taboo to talk about race at all. Antiracist Cuban activists who rejected a raceless approach and wanted to show pride in their blackness such as Walterio Carbonell and Juan René Betancourt in the 1960s, were punished with exile or imprisonment.

Esteban Morales Domínguez, a professor in the University of Havana, believes that "the absence of the debate on the racial problem already threatens {...} the revolution's social project." Carlos Moore, who has written extensively on the issue, says that "there is an unstated threat, blacks in Cuba know that whenever you raise race in Cuba, you go to jail. Therefore the struggle in Cuba is different. There cannot be a civil rights movement. You will have instantly 10,000 black people dead." He says that a new generation of black Cubans are looking at politics in another way. Cuban rap groups of today are fighting against this censorship; Hermanos de Causa explains the problem best by saying, "Don’t you tell me that there isn’t any [racism], because I have seen it/ don’t tell me that it doesn’t exist, because I have lived it."


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Last edited by ASPartOfMe on 20 Jul 2021, 8:43 am, edited 2 times in total.

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20 Jul 2021, 8:34 am

There are only two equalizers: Poverty and Death.


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21 Jul 2021, 8:45 am

BLM's statement should finally put to rest the myth that BLM isn't a Marxist organization.