Comparing Russia vs Ukraine to other countries

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SkinnedWolf
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18 Jun 2022, 11:29 am

magz wrote:
Bar code is just a way of writing a number.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barcode
Quote:
A barcode or bar code is a method of representing data in a visual, machine-readable form.

I would suggest that OP check ADHD or dyslexia.(in an autism club, it's not a shame.)
Those posts that followed basically smelled like someone claiming that cursive could be used for mind control.


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The_Walrus
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18 Jun 2022, 2:59 pm

A microchip powered by blood flow is just nonsense. We are a very long way from that sort of technology.

Subdermal microchips would probably be powered by the electromagnetic fields that they intereact with, like contactless credit cards. That's technology that actually exists. There is no need to "recharge".

If a tyrant did want to put subdermal radio transmitters in every person to "stop terrorism" (it's not at all clear to me how that would stop terrorism), then they'd need to include a battery, and probably have them charge contactlessly (very difficult because people are unlikely to stay still long enough). Honestly, I can't see any tyrant thinking it is worth the effort. It would make more sense to use ankle tags, like those used in modern electronic monitoring of criminals under house arrest or required not to drink.



Fnord
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18 Jun 2022, 5:58 pm

Anyone with real understanding of the technology (such as an someone with an MSEE degree) would already know that “blood-powered” electronics are nothing more than a soft science-fiction fantasy -- something you might find in a fanzine or self-published comic book.

Radio-Frequency IDentification (RFID) chips get their power from external sources; specifically, the devices used to scan them. RF IDentification uses wireless technology operating in the Radio Frequency (RF) part of the electromagnetic spectrum to carry information between an RFID tag and an RFID reader.

RFID is most often used in one of these four frequency bands:

• Low Frequency (LF): 125 to 134 KHz band
• High Frequency (HF): 13.56 MHz
• Ultra High Frequency: (UHF) 433 MHZ and 860 to 956 MHz band
• Microwave Frequency: 2.45 to 5.8 GHz band

RFID systems have been around since WWII. Range is limited by the output power of the scanning device -- usually from 1 to 10 meters -- and by the relative size of the antenna to the wave length of the RF signal. For example, the wavelength for the 125 to 134 MHz band is over 2000 km long, while the antenna for an implantable RFID microchip is only about 1 cm long.

The chip is enclosed in an 11-14 mm plastic or glass cylinder weighing around 0.025 grams, which is implanted just under the skin. The chip itself contains a unique identification number that is only 9, 10, or 15 digits long, depending on the application. Microchips do not contain any personal information.

Whoever wants to know more about microchips can ask me, or they can buy a microchip for less than 50 USD and read the instructions that come with it.



Last edited by Fnord on 18 Jun 2022, 6:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

uncommondenominator
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18 Jun 2022, 5:59 pm

If only there were some type of electronic device that had multiple cameras and microphones, the ability to broadcast it's location, send and receive large amounts of data, and even perform tasks like facial recognition, voice recognition, or maybe even read fingerprints. Something with a unique identifier, like a 10-digit code, so it would be easy to tell who's it was. It would need to be left on all the time, but be battery powered, with some way to get regularly recharged. And maybe there's some way to make it appealing, so that people would WANT to have one, rather than needing to make them have one. And they'd even pay for it all, since they'd want to have one.

*Looks at cell phone*

Oh...



Fnord
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18 Jun 2022, 6:09 pm

^ Spot On!! ^

Why fight against the limitations of microchip technology, when there already exists the technology to not only track and monitor its owner, but that already has the reputation for being remotely tapped (e.g., “hacked”) for the images, Internet history, and list of contacts generated by its owner.

This whole “microchip conspiracy” must have originated from within a paranoiac’s fever-dream.


:lol:



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19 Jun 2022, 12:26 am

Fnord wrote:
^ Spot On!! ^

This whole “microchip conspiracy” must have originated from within a paranoiac’s fever-dream.


:lol:


Realistically, it could have come from any mind to which even mundane technology may as well be magic. When one doesn't understand how things work, it's even easier to invent nonsense and find it reasonable, as they lack knowledge of the boundaries of what is or isn't possible.

As for comparing Russia and Ukraine to other countries, you can compare an ostrich to an eagle all you want, but it still won't fly. It's all well and good to focus on the perceived similarities, but critical differences still may exist.



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19 Jun 2022, 8:59 am

Fnord wrote:
^ Spot On!! ^

Why fight against the limitations of microchip technology, when there already exists the technology to not only track and monitor its owner, but that already has the reputation for being remotely tapped (e.g., “hacked”) for the images, Internet history, and list of contacts generated by its owner.

This whole “microchip conspiracy” must have originated from within a paranoiac’s fever-dream.


:lol:


So you are saying two opposite things. First, you are saying that we don’t have such an advanced technology as to track someone. And then you are saying our cell phones can do just that. Don’t you see a contradiction here?

In any case, speaking of a cell phone, I changed from advanced cell phone to flip phone a year ago. Not just because of tracking but also to deal with my internet addiction. But with the chip, one won’t be able to remove it. That’s the difference.



magz
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19 Jun 2022, 10:20 am

There's no contradiction.

1. Existing microchip technology is largely useless for tracking and spying on people;
2. Existing smartphone technology is very convenient for tracking and spying on people.

So, whoever wants to violate our privacy, won't use microchips. They use phones.


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19 Jun 2022, 10:26 am

magz wrote:
There's no contradiction.

1. Existing microchip technology is largely useless for tracking and spying on people;
2. Existing smartphone technology is very convenient for tracking and spying on people.

So, whoever wants to violate our privacy, won't use microchips. They use phones.


AND...

The antichrist wont even hafta to force us to have it (as the Bible seems to imply). We will all just gleefully, and happily, tie the collar and leash around our own necks ...and shell out money for the privilege...because we all gotta have our own smart phone!



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19 Jun 2022, 10:38 am

QFT wrote:
So you are saying two opposite things. First, you are saying that we don’t have such an advanced technology as to track someone. And then you are saying our cell phones can do just that.
Wrong again!

Please pay attention.

I am saying that we do not have the level of microchip technology (e.g., of the kind that uses human blood as fuel) required to track someone from a distance (e.g., from orbit). I am also saying that the injectable microchips (which are too large to be injected into the bloodstream) we do have require a nearby scanner (e.g., 10cm or less distance) to be read, that those microchips return only a serial number (and no personal information), that the RFID tags used for vehicle tolling require an RF transmitter within 10 meters, and that you would benefit greatly by acquiring an education in real-world technology instead of letting those YouTube videos do your thinking for you.

Do you get all that?



Last edited by Fnord on 19 Jun 2022, 10:43 am, edited 1 time in total.

Fnord
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19 Jun 2022, 10:42 am

magz wrote:
There's no contradiction.

1. Existing microchip technology is largely useless for tracking and spying on people;
2. Existing smartphone technology is very convenient for tracking and spying on people.

So, whoever wants to violate our privacy, won't use microchips. They use phones.
Do you work in technology? You seem to have a better grasp of the field than certain other people.



magz
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19 Jun 2022, 10:49 am

Fnord wrote:
magz wrote:
There's no contradiction.

1. Existing microchip technology is largely useless for tracking and spying on people;
2. Existing smartphone technology is very convenient for tracking and spying on people.

So, whoever wants to violate our privacy, won't use microchips. They use phones.
Do you work in technology? You seem to have a better grasp of the field than certain other people.
No, my branch is physics.
My husband works in technology and he often uses me to rubberduck. I learn quite a lot simply trying to be a supportive wife :D
I'm considering finding an IT job when my health stabilizes reliably enough - or if our family urgently needs additional money, even at a cost of health risks.


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Fnord
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19 Jun 2022, 11:00 am

magz wrote:
Fnord wrote:
magz wrote:
There's no contradiction.

1. Existing microchip technology is largely useless for tracking and spying on people;
2. Existing smartphone technology is very convenient for tracking and spying on people.

So, whoever wants to violate our privacy, won't use microchips. They use phones.
Do you work in technology? You seem to have a better grasp of the field than certain other people.
No, my branch is physics.
My husband works in technology and he often uses me to rubberduck. I learn quite a lot simply trying to be a supportive wife :D
I'm considering finding an IT job when my health stabilizes reliably enough - or if our family urgently needs additional money, even at a cost of other sacrifices.
I spent about 4 years supporting the “D-Zero” project at the Fermilab cyclotron in Batavia, Illinois. Those physicists were wonderful people, and I learned a lot of science from them in addition to what I had already learned at university. Retiring soon, and I miss those days.



magz
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19 Jun 2022, 11:33 am

Tevatron was a worthy predecessor of LHC in exploring fundamental physics :)
And there's a lot of technology knowledge necessary to work on such experiments.


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19 Jun 2022, 3:01 pm

QFT wrote:

In any case, speaking of a cell phone, I changed from advanced cell phone to flip phone a year ago. Not just because of tracking but also to deal with my internet addiction. But with the chip, one won’t be able to remove it. That’s the difference.


Well...

Flip phones still have microphones (and often cameras, too), can still send and receive data, and can still be tracked.



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19 Jun 2022, 5:09 pm

uncommondenominator wrote:
QFT wrote:

In any case, speaking of a cell phone, I changed from advanced cell phone to flip phone a year ago. Not just because of tracking but also to deal with my internet addiction. But with the chip, one won’t be able to remove it. That’s the difference.


Well...

Flip phones still have microphones (and often cameras, too), can still send and receive data, and can still be tracked.


When I got my flip phone they actually asked me if I wanted an internet, I said no. As a result of not having internet I also don’t have location detection either, even though I wish I did: traveling is healthy, internet addiction isn’t. But apparently these two things go hand in hand since both are tied to radio waves.

So what I conclude from this is they switched off radio signal from my flip phone. This means they can’t track me down, just like I can’t see my own location.