The Major Factor underlying the Increase in Rampage Killings

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What is the Major Factor underlying the Increase of Rampage Killings in the last 3 Decades?
Guns. 16%  16%  [ 12 ]
A New Demographic of Males under the age of 26. 3%  3%  [ 2 ]
The loss or abscence of a Social Role in Society. 27%  27%  [ 20 ]
Violent Video Games. 4%  4%  [ 3 ]
Mental Disturbance. 21%  21%  [ 16 ]
Expiration of the Federal Assault Weapons Ban in 2004. 5%  5%  [ 4 ]
Other, Please Comment. 24%  24%  [ 18 ]
Total votes : 75

Dox47
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24 Dec 2012, 4:24 am

^
I remember reading about that case, one of my gun boards linked to it as an example of a school "shooting" that didn't involve a gun. Weird and tragic for sure, at least he seemed to contain his rage to people he actually knew and held responsible rather than random strangers.


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aghogday
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24 Dec 2012, 4:38 am

John_Browning wrote:


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Fox cited a particularly broad set of FBI and police data that counted shootings between 1980 and 2010 in which four or more people were killed: The average pace was about 20 mass murders per year, with a death toll of about 100. Casualty counts fluctuated wildly -- some years would have almost 125 dead, but then be followed by a year with fewer than 50 mass shooting fatalities. Far steadier was the number of attacks, which usually stayed at fewer than 25 per year.

This year has been especially bloody, though. According to a running tally by Mother Jones magazine, whose counts slightly differ -- the magazine excluded robberies and gang violence, to some criticism, and limited the tally to public attacks -- 2012 has been the deadliest year for mass shootings since 1982 by far, with almost 80 dead.


While gang violence and robberies might fit under the category of Massacres that Fox has constructed, they do not fit under the category of Rampage Killings/Spree Killings. Fox included robberies and gang violence in his numbers; Mother Jones excluded those variables that do not meet the definition of a rampage killing or spree killing.

The type of Massacres that Fox identified happen on average less than every three weeks, according to the broad data he used from FBI and Police Data. And his data stops abruptly at 2009, not inclusive of 2012, that had the highest numbers of rampage/killing spree incidences and bodies counted on record. And note, the criticism identified on the Mother Jones research, was provided in a blog in an opinion piece.



aghogday
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24 Dec 2012, 4:48 am

Dox47 wrote:
^
I remember reading about that case, one of my gun boards linked to it as an example of a school "shooting" that didn't involve a gun. Weird and tragic for sure, at least he seemed to contain his rage to people he actually knew and held responsible rather than random strangers.


At least from the story, it appears that his father did not provide him that opportunity if there was any intention of expanding the body count. He did not provide any intention of expanding it in his suicide note.

http://trib.com/news/local/casper/son-k ... c5e75.html

Quote:
Chris Krumm stepped into the classroom and drew back the bowstring. His father, Casper College professor Jim Krumm, was close; maybe only four feet away. Chris fired a single arrow.

It struck his father in the side of the head, and traveled through to the other side. The impact knocked the older man to the floor.

But the 56-year-old rose and fought back. Police aren’t sure how long the struggle lasted, but it gave the students inside enough time to escape.

Somehow in the chaos that followed, the door was bumped shut. It locked father and son inside, in a final struggle.



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24 Dec 2012, 4:55 am

aghogday wrote:
John_Browning wrote:


Quote:
Fox cited a particularly broad set of FBI and police data that counted shootings between 1980 and 2010 in which four or more people were killed: The average pace was about 20 mass murders per year, with a death toll of about 100. Casualty counts fluctuated wildly -- some years would have almost 125 dead, but then be followed by a year with fewer than 50 mass shooting fatalities. Far steadier was the number of attacks, which usually stayed at fewer than 25 per year.

This year has been especially bloody, though. According to a running tally by Mother Jones magazine, whose counts slightly differ -- the magazine excluded robberies and gang violence, to some criticism, and limited the tally to public attacks -- 2012 has been the deadliest year for mass shootings since 1982 by far, with almost 80 dead.


While gang violence and robberies might fit under the category of Massacres that Fox has constructed, they do not fit under the category of Rampage Killings/Spree Killings. Fox included robberies and gang violence in his numbers; Mother Jones excluded those variables that do not meet the definition of a rampage killing or spree killing.

The type of Massacres that Fox identified happen on average less than every three weeks, according to the broad data he used from FBI and Police Data. And his data stops abruptly at 2009, not inclusive of 2012, that had the highest numbers of rampage/killing spree incidences and bodies counted on record. And note, the criticism identified on the Mother Jones research, was provided in a blog in an opinion piece.

All have the motive of killing multiple people. The Mother Jones article spins the statistics to count only the more emotionally charged incidents.


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aghogday
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24 Dec 2012, 6:30 am

If someone robs a bank or any other type of robbery there is the potential that multiple people will be killed if it is an armed robbery, however the robbery is most often considered the motive, not one of killing people. Robberies have been reported on a steady decline since the early 90's; it would only stand to reason that if rampage killings that were increasing were averaged into these other classified crimes that are decreasing there would not likely be as much of an overall increase or decrease over time since the early 90's. Gang violence was at it's peak during the 80's in the crack wars, however the crime of drug trafficking was often associated with that gang violence.

The lull in rampage killings of all types in the US in the 50's and early 60s, is an enigma in the last hundred years. Wiki uses a broad definition where as few as 1 can be killed with sufficient numbers injured. Even with that broad definition that lull is extremely evident.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ra ... :_Americas

I have not seen a definition of rampage killings/spree killings that include gang violence or robberies, anywhere but what Mr. Fox has constructed and describes. The much longer time span studied by the New York Times, in the year 2000, also did not include gang violence or robberies in that research and result.



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24 Dec 2012, 8:28 am

Crazy people being crazy and doing crazy things.

Oh, and I'm going to point the finger at the way the media loves to sensationalize these events, lending instant fame and notoriety to the killer in question.

Many of these screwballs have narcissistic traits that only become inflamed by all of the coverage given to the perpetrators of these violent acts. My prediction is the next nutcase is going to shoot-up a daycare center and waste a bunch of infants in order to out-do" Lanza and get even more attention.


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J-Greens
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24 Dec 2012, 9:02 am

American media and tv shows are shown across the world and yet it's only America that has this problem...

Just look at other Western countries where gun fatalities are the lowest. What is different there ? Why do they not feel the need to have guns, specially semi automatic assault weapons, around the house ?



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24 Dec 2012, 10:46 am

XFilesGeek wrote:
Crazy people being crazy and doing crazy things.

Oh, and I'm going to point the finger at the way the media loves to sensationalize these events, lending instant fame and notoriety to the killer in question.

Many of these screwballs have narcissistic traits that only become inflamed by all of the coverage given to the perpetrators of these violent acts. My prediction is the next nutcase is going to shoot-up a daycare center and waste a bunch of infants in order to out-do" Lanza and get even more attention.
This doesn't make sense to me. Many of these killers kill themselves. Others avoid being caught or recognized, or at least plead not guilty when caught. None of these, especially suicide, leads me to think they just want attention.

Most of the answers I see, here and in other media, just seem too superficial and simplistic to me. The human psyche is complex. There are as many reasons for killing as there are killers. For many of these crimes we will never know all the answers. Having lost a family member to violence many years ago, I can honestly say that I'm not even sure I want to know the answers. I like being inside my mind. I don't want to be inside the mind of the person who would kill my loved one, and that is the only way to really understand it. I will never understand it, won't pretend to, or imagine that I ever can.

I think that when we look at these incidents, a modicum of humility is called for, to admit to ourselves we don't know everything about human behavior - rather than to act as if we have all the answers and that it's as simple as passing a law, eradicating one type of weapon, or marginalizing yet another group of people. Most of the so-called solutions seem to me to come with their own multitude of problems.



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24 Dec 2012, 11:51 am

xenon13 wrote:
I blame the increasing inequality, particularly as this is a manifestation of this idea that a narrowing circle of "winners" have the right to trample upon the widening masses of "losers" who are said to deserve this abuse ... the disempowerment of millions of people that's ongoing, and the resulting increase in mistrust throughout society. Though Mr. Lanza was from a privileged background, his personal issues meant that his status in his own community was lower, and as the wider society says such people can and should be abused and reminded of their inferiority, it's clear that he was subject to such pressures and made to feel powerless and without value.


if this was a dominant feature more blacks, islamists and hispanics would present as spree shooters
it appears to be those from the top of the s**tpile doing the shooting



ruveyn
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24 Dec 2012, 12:10 pm

How do you guys classify the murder and mayhem done by Bashir Assad on people in Syria?

Is what he does rampage killing?

See http://english.alarabiya.net/articles/2 ... 38840.html

ruveyn



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24 Dec 2012, 1:20 pm

ruveyn wrote:
How do you guys classify the murder and mayhem done by Bashir Assad on people in Syria?

Is what he does rampage killing?

See http://english.alarabiya.net/articles/2 ... 38840.html

ruveyn


I think Assad should be put into a separate class of megalomaniacal killers who have armies and secret police forces to kill and maim vast numbers for them, which would also include Hitler, Stalin, Mao, etc.

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Orr
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24 Dec 2012, 2:37 pm

I would echo Mike1's list, coupled with the growth in social media. My fear/ hatred of Facebook may be unreasonable in depth, but I would smite it.


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24 Dec 2012, 2:52 pm

From watching Bowling For Columbine yesterday, it looks like the media is also partially to blame for the number of gun murders in the United States. The American news stations spread propaganda and fuel hysteria, whereas the Canadian news stations seem more honest and intelligible. Canada's gun murder rate is far lower than America's. A lot of Canadians don't even lock their doors.



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24 Dec 2012, 4:25 pm

i dont believe it is so much and issue of why rampage killings are on the rise.rampage crimes are on the rise because the world is becoming more chaotic.
so the question is then,why is the world becoming more chaotic?because human civilization is getting older.chaos is a natural and mathmatical side affect of time itself.its like when you buy a deck of cards the cards are all in a row from the king of spades to the ace of clubs.if you shuffle the deck the cards disorganize and the more and more you continue to shuffle the deck,the more chaotic the layout of the cards progessively becomes.

thats why eccentric human behavior is on the rise because human culture ages and matures like anything else and sometimes like wine if it ages to much it turns to vinager.people inherit the genes and DNA of there parent yet people are not clones of there parents either because every child's DNA mutates slightly from there parents otherwise we would be clones of our parents.so as more and more people procreate and breed the more varied the breeding paterns.and of coarse like a learning curve when there are fewer people it takes longer for the population to grow,if you have more people people breed like wildfire and the human population increases progressively even if people have fewer kids per family just the sheer numbers of people on earth increases population growth.

rates of death do offset numerical population growth and many countries are at 0% population growth but death has no affect on time and the effect time has on culture.im not talking about gross population growth but the affect the age of a culture has on human behavior.as the human race and its culture ages culture becomes more and more random.

im am not very good at putting concepts into words but i think i have unelequentley explained why human behavior will become more and more random and chaotic


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24 Dec 2012, 4:36 pm

vermontsavant wrote:
i dont believe it is so much and issue of why rampage killings are on the rise.rampage crimes are on the rise because the world is becoming more chaotic.
This is something I think about too, and part of that is the population explosion. Someone a long time ago described it to me as the rats in a cage syndrome. Too many rats in the cage and they start gnawing on each other. I'm not sure if that's true, but the idea makes some sense to me. I think we live in a world in which life is cheap, portrayed as such in fiction, acted on as such by corporate bottom-line mindsets and corrupt governments, cheapened still more by our immense numbers.