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SecretSavant
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25 Mar 2014, 11:33 pm

emtyeye wrote:
Prof_Pretorius wrote:
This bloke says that the plane had four to six transponders that would have gone off if the plane went into the sea, and he points out that no submarines reported hearing the impact of such a large aircraft hitting the ocean at high speed.

http://sofrep.com/34084/alright-goodnig ... ht-mh-370/

interesting article outside the mainstream of journalists ...


Very interesting article. Thanks for posting it. It really had a lot of info not available in other articles I've seen. My only problem with the author's personal theory at the end is if this was so, why wouldn't the pilot have made his demands known to the world at large and not just to the Malaysian government? He already knew they are not trustworthy, to say the least. If he really wanted to do damage, it seems like he would make the demand in a way that was audible to the world somehow.

A question I have for you who are following this story as am I, is, Is it really possible for a jet to go off all satellite detection? Isn't the world pretty much under a blanket of complete surveillance by satellite? And if it is, maybe this was somehow done to contradict what is now coming to light about how complete this surveillance really is, as is shown my Snowden, etc.

Just a thought.


I thought the same thing. It's what we all presumed incorrectly, perhaps, or the giant vacuum cleaner isn't spitting out any bread crumbs just to be spiteful.


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26 Mar 2014, 12:25 pm

Biscuitman wrote:
confirmed on the news this morning that the black box signal range is 2000 metres and that it only lasts for 30 days.

I am trying to think of an analogy more severe than a needle in a haystack but can't. Maybe a needle in a field of haystacks would do here.


Before you can look for the needle, you have to find out where the haystack is.


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26 Mar 2014, 7:24 pm

~ahem~ (cough)
I think it's high time to go ahead with the title of this thread. Thus far we have (pretty much) the classic 'Bermuda Triangle' pattern.
A large aircraft disappears, confusing radar images are reported, a high number of search craft are launched to find it and all come up empty handed, contradictory evidence is trotted out by 'experts' and we are left with no good theory of explanation.


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26 Mar 2014, 9:03 pm

Prof_Pretorius wrote:
~ahem~ (cough)
I think it's high time to go ahead with the title of this thread. Thus far we have (pretty much) the classic 'Bermuda Triangle' pattern.
A large aircraft disappears, confusing radar images are reported, a high number of search craft are launched to find it and all come up empty handed, contradictory evidence is trotted out by 'experts' and we are left with no good theory of explanation.


We have an eminently good hypothesis of what happened.

We know, for a fact, that the aircraft went down at the limit of its range due to fuel exhaustion, because it was still in the air when the last ping was sent, and the analysis of those signals puts the aircraft in the Southern Indian Ocean. It could not have circled in the Andaman Sea, and still reached it's last calculated position. It could not have been hijacked to Central Asia and reached it's last calculated position.

We know, therefore, that it was turned around at the time that communication ceased, and flown, dark and quiet, west then south.

We know that this was done by a person with strong knowledge of both the aircraft and navigation. The aircraft appears to have followed navigation corridors for the early part of its diversion. We have good reason to believe that the aircraft remained airworthy until fuel exhaustion. That suggests strongly that ACARS and the transponder were deliberately silenced.

And I think it is well within the bounds of credibility to assume that whoever did this was very keen that the aircraft not be found; and that even if it was, that the CVR and FDR would have no useful data to reveal about the aircraft's redirection.

If a body is found, we might be able to confirm hypoxia or blunt force trauma as a cause of death. If the data recorders are found, we might be able to glean some further information about who--or what--was flying the plane in those last two hours.

There is nothing in the least "Bermuda Triangle" about this. The fact that the aircraft has not been found is no great mystery--they are looking in an area of millions of square km, for an object that fits inside an 80m box.


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26 Mar 2014, 9:22 pm

visagrunt wrote:
Prof_Pretorius wrote:
~ahem~ (cough)
I think it's high time to go ahead with the title of this thread. Thus far we have (pretty much) the classic 'Bermuda Triangle' pattern.
A large aircraft disappears, confusing radar images are reported, a high number of search craft are launched to find it and all come up empty handed, contradictory evidence is trotted out by 'experts' and we are left with no good theory of explanation.


We have an eminently good hypothesis of what happened.

We know, for a fact, that the aircraft went down at the limit of its range due to fuel exhaustion, because it was still in the air when the last ping was sent, and the analysis of those signals puts the aircraft in the Southern Indian Ocean. It could not have circled in the Andaman Sea, and still reached it's last calculated position. It could not have been hijacked to Central Asia and reached it's last calculated position.

We know, therefore, that it was turned around at the time that communication ceased, and flown, dark and quiet, west then south.

We know that this was done by a person with strong knowledge of both the aircraft and navigation. The aircraft appears to have followed navigation corridors for the early part of its diversion. We have good reason to believe that the aircraft remained airworthy until fuel exhaustion. That suggests strongly that ACARS and the transponder were deliberately silenced.

And I think it is well within the bounds of credibility to assume that whoever did this was very keen that the aircraft not be found; and that even if it was, that the CVR and FDR would have no useful data to reveal about the aircraft's redirection.

If a body is found, we might be able to confirm hypoxia or blunt force trauma as a cause of death. If the data recorders are found, we might be able to glean some further information about who--or what--was flying the plane in those last two hours.

There is nothing in the least "Bermuda Triangle" about this. The fact that the aircraft has not been found is no great mystery--they are looking in an area of millions of square km, for an object that fits inside an 80m box.


Yes, it is a huge area that will be very hard to search. If there are bodies found, that will produce more clues. But I don't see any mystery here, and my question stands: How is it possible for an aircraft to really go off all satellite imaging? The world is literally blanketed. Here is a link to a video of Oliver Stone smashing the current surveillance state under Obama. (It would not matter who is president.)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R2kpyYWd0eo

This is a media and psy-op event, like 911, Sandy Hook, Boston Marathon, Pearl Harbor, Gulf of Tonkin, Reichstag, on and on. It is an event staged to control the minds of the masses.


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27 Mar 2014, 9:06 am

Answer two questions, though:

What are those satellites looking for?

How are those satellites looking?

In normal operations, an aircraft is easy to locate. It tells anyone who wants to know where it is, how high it is flying and how fast it is flying. So why should satellites be looking for airplanes in flight? That's a useless waste of communications bandwidth, except for the 1 in 10,000,000 flight where someone shuts off all communication. So the first answer to your question is, it is possible for an aircraft to go missing, because satellites aren't looking for aircraft

The second issue is how satellites look at the earth. The vast majority of them are receiving and transmitting electronic signals--but if an aircraft isn't sending any, the satellite is blind. The only signal that MH370 was sending was the handshake. There are satellites that capture visual images, of course, but they do not provide universal coverage of the earth's surface. Unless someone happens to have been looking at the correct bit of ocean, at the correct time, the aircraft never would have appeared on a satellite image.

And don't forget that almost all of the flight took place in darkness--only the last hour or two would have taken place in daylight. So even if a satellite had been in the right location, taking pictures at the right time, the chances are good that darkness would have prevented seeing it.


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27 Mar 2014, 11:56 am

There are also satellites that monitor sudden bursts of intense heat, like a rocket launch. That's how we know the number of rockets fired off by that chap in North Korea. Presumably one of these satellites would have caught the heat of the plane exploding.

Here's an article saying that the things that have been spotted may not be from the airplane.
http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/27/world/asi ... ?hpt=hp_t1


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27 Mar 2014, 6:47 pm

Prof_Pretorius wrote:
There are also satellites that monitor sudden bursts of intense heat, like a rocket launch. That's how we know the number of rockets fired off by that chap in North Korea. Presumably one of these satellites would have caught the heat of the plane exploding.

Here's an article saying that the things that have been spotted may not be from the airplane.
http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/27/world/asi ... ?hpt=hp_t1


First, who's looking for a rocket launch in the middle of the Southern Indian Ocean?

Second, how much of a heat signature would an aircraft present on impact after fuel starvation? There is certainly a lot of kinetic energy to be wrapped up in the plane, but in the absence of an accellerant, there would likely be a very small, short lived heat signature.


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31 Mar 2014, 10:19 am

Seems obvious to us, but not so to NTs. They're sending a special ping locating device to search. HULLO ! ! That would have been the FIRST equipment I'd send.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/31/world/asi ... ?hpt=hp_t1

This just in …..they now say the previous last words weren't the actual last words …

http://news.msn.com/world/malaysia-chan ... ts-cockpit


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01 Apr 2014, 2:27 pm

But where would you have sent it, and how long do you suppose that it would have taken to get there?

The search initially began in the Gulf of Thailand, and then moved on to the Andaman Sea, and only more recently to the South Indian Ocean.

You couldn't send the locator to the South Indian Ocean until you knew that was the place you wanted to look, and you can't get it there faster than a ship can get there.


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01 Apr 2014, 5:28 pm

visagrunt wrote:
But where would you have sent it, and how long do you suppose that it would have taken to get there?

The search initially began in the Gulf of Thailand, and then moved on to the Andaman Sea, and only more recently to the South Indian Ocean.

You couldn't send the locator to the South Indian Ocean until you knew that was the place you wanted to look, and you can't get it there faster than a ship can get there.


Thanks for asking. I would have sent it to all those locations as they became known.
Plenty of functioning aircraft to move it around.


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05 Apr 2014, 12:55 pm

A PING ! ! They've detected a ping. Or have they? The details switch so often.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/05/world/asi ... ?hpt=hp_t1


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