Apple to FBI: We aren't complying with U.S. Court Order!

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xenocity
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17 Feb 2016, 10:05 am

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The implications of the government’s demands are chilling. If the government can use the All Writs Act to make it easier to unlock your iPhone, it would have the power to reach into anyone’s device to capture their data. The government could extend this breach of privacy and demand that Apple build surveillance software to intercept your messages, access your health records or financial data, track your location, or even access your phone’s microphone or camera without your knowledge.

Opposing this order is not something we take lightly. We feel we must speak up in the face of what we see as an overreach by the U.S. government.

We are challenging the FBI’s demands with the deepest respect for American democracy and a love of our country. We believe it would be in the best interest of everyone to step back and consider the implications.

While we believe the FBI’s intentions are good, it would be wrong for the government to force us to build a backdoor into our products. And ultimately, we fear that this demand would undermine the very freedoms and liberty our government is meant to protect.
http://www.apple.com/customer-letter/

I didn't post the full statement, because it would violate WP's rule on long OPs and posts (As I've been warned before).

This is final part to the response published on Apple's website this morning to the response to yesterday's U.S. Court Order that Apple produce a special iOS update to unlock the iPhone 5c work phone of the San Bernardino Shooter.

Apple claims they cannot break the iOS encryption on post iPhone 4 and they will not go the length to produce a special iOS update to comply with the U.S. Court Order.

They plan to take it to U.S. Supreme Court to settle the issue once and for all.

Have no fear, Google and the Android OEMs are fully patriotic in their cooperation with the U.S. and other governments in the fight against terrorism and crime (as is Microsoft and the rest).


Will you stand with Apple over "freedom", "privacy", and "liberty"?


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AJisHere
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17 Feb 2016, 1:26 pm

Well, good for Apple; even though I don't believe for a second they're doing this on principle.


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AspieUtah
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17 Feb 2016, 1:32 pm

Sooo, are Apple Inc.'s leaders suddenly conspiracy theorists?

Shouldn't they trust their government rulers?

Hehe, such normalcy bias among Wrong Planetians!


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nurseangela
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17 Feb 2016, 6:08 pm

Freedom? We don't have freedom on our cell phones. The NSA has tons of info probably on all of us in this forum.

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/nsa-sn ... ds-n384841

I say that Apple better unlock that phone or they are working for the terrorists.


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wowiexist
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17 Feb 2016, 7:19 pm

Id rather take the minute chance that I might get blown up by terrorists who used an encrypted phone than take the larger chance that my private information will be hacked.



nurseangela
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17 Feb 2016, 7:20 pm

wowiexist wrote:
Id rather take the minute chance that I might get blown up by terrorists who used an encrypted phone than take the larger chance that my private information will be hacked.


Do you not know about the NSA?


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luan78zao
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17 Feb 2016, 7:25 pm

When the police need to enter one person's apartment, they don't demand that the landlord give them a passkey which opens ALL apartments (and then keep it forever).

I have no illusions about real privacy online, but still: Good for Apple.


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17 Feb 2016, 7:29 pm

The company should have the choice over whether to help or not. Sure, it makes them look like jerks if they don't, but if they aren't complicit in the crime, then it's only fair to give them the choice.



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17 Feb 2016, 7:33 pm

AJisHere wrote:
Well, good for Apple; even though I don't believe for a second they're doing this on principle.


I have to agree with this. Hooray for Apple here on this one, but they are likely just trying to increase their market share with people who oppose big government. Many of those people are also quite weary of technology. If Apple is the good guys in this department, they may gain a bigger edge.

I oppose any intrusion into people's lives and do not trust the FBI one bit. They should have zero right to access any information outside of an official investigation based on probable cause. But we're all suspects now...

But this is unstoppable. Big brother is alive, well, and growing rapidly. What scares me most is how many people actually have been convinced it's a good idea. Hooray fear mongering!



nurseangela
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17 Feb 2016, 7:37 pm

Why can't the FBI just get a court order?

Is the IPhone the only one that can't be gotten into? Do Androids do the same? And if Androids don't, why does Apple make their phones like that? And I heard that Iphones never really turn off and that is so information can always be had by your phone from the camera and the speaker - that's why you can't remove the battery.


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17 Feb 2016, 8:55 pm

I've been trying to decide how I feel about this, cuz I can definitely understand BOTH sides.

The only thing I can come-up with, regarding a solution, is why don't they have Secret Service, or whomever, take the phone to Apple, and sit there with the phone in sight, while Apple writes a by-pass (or, whatever) for that ONE phone, so that the FBI can have unlimited tries on finding-out the passcode. Apple can shred whatever coding they did for the by-pass, and it would never leave their environs, and thus get-out to / be of public knowledge.









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pezar
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17 Feb 2016, 10:31 pm

nurseangela wrote:
Why can't the FBI just get a court order?

Is the IPhone the only one that can't be gotten into? Do Androids do the same? And if Androids don't, why does Apple make their phones like that? And I heard that Iphones never really turn off and that is so information can always be had by your phone from the camera and the speaker - that's why you can't remove the battery.


Steve Jobs had quite a twisted rationale for making Apple products impossible to fully turn off, even in the early days. It had something to do with Jobs's fear of death, he was afraid that God(s) could just flick a switch or something and zap, you're gone. Like in some of those cheap scifi movies where a futuristic weapon could make people vanish without a trace, probably inspired by the "phasers" in Star Trek. So, Jobs never wanted Apple products to "die", instead he made them just "go to sleep" (inspiring the "sleep mode" on PCs, probably) and then they would "wake up" when needed. Apple products were the first "energy vampires", electronic items that are always on and sucking energy. Ironically, when Jobs got cancer, he decided to "cure" it with a special diet, instead of seeing a doctor. By the time he actually saw a doctor, it was too late. Jobs's biological father worked as an assistant manager of a casino well into his 80s. Jobs could still have been leading Apple today if he hadn't been so pigheaded.



AJisHere
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17 Feb 2016, 11:57 pm

Campin_Cat wrote:
I've been trying to decide how I feel about this, cuz I can definitely understand BOTH sides.

The only thing I can come-up with, regarding a solution, is why don't they have Secret Service, or whomever, take the phone to Apple, and sit there with the phone in sight, while Apple writes a by-pass (or, whatever) for that ONE phone, so that the FBI can have unlimited tries on finding-out the passcode. Apple can shred whatever coding they did for the by-pass, and it would never leave their environs, and thus get-out to / be of public knowledge.


They've been taking steps to make it so it's impossible to do with any of their products. So even they cannot bypass these security measures. It's a response to that whole PRISM thing. If they make it so they can choose to get around it, there's no point in putting those measures in place to begin with.


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Campin_Cat
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18 Feb 2016, 5:47 am

^^ Oh, okay----THANKS!!













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Fugu
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18 Feb 2016, 12:22 pm

Campin_Cat wrote:
I've been trying to decide how I feel about this, cuz I can definitely understand BOTH sides.

The only thing I can come-up with, regarding a solution, is why don't they have Secret Service, or whomever, take the phone to Apple, and sit there with the phone in sight, while Apple writes a by-pass (or, whatever) for that ONE phone, so that the FBI can have unlimited tries on finding-out the passcode. Apple can shred whatever coding they did for the by-pass, and it would never leave their environs, and thus get-out to / be of public knowledge.
part of the issue with that approach is that any backdoor that Apple/the NSA can get into, someone else can get into also. this someone else is probably going to be a hacker.