Automated cars, and Criminals and Law

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AspergianMutantt
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02 Oct 2016, 12:05 pm

They made it legal for automated cars now, in California. I cant wait to see in the news where the police arrest someone expecting to impound their cars, only to see the cars drive them selves home. what are they going to do? tell the car to pull over? police like searching the cars they impound, its a warrentless way for them to get away with it. that will become problematic when the car drives its self home to privet property. What they will try to do next it want some way to disable the automations, to turn off the auto controls on the cars, which will lead to court battles over peoples rights to their privet property laws. also, cars do not need licenses to drive and do not break laws as humans do to where they can be arrested. also if the police can shut down or control other peoples cars it opens the doorway for criminals to do the same to other civilians cars they intend to rob. much conflict of interest there. the next decade or two is going to get interesting when it comes to automations.



ZenDen
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02 Oct 2016, 2:28 pm

AspergianMutantt wrote:
They made it legal for automated cars now, in California. I cant wait to see in the news where the police arrest someone expecting to impound their cars, only to see the cars drive them selves home. what are they going to do? tell the car to pull over? police like searching the cars they impound, its a warrentless way for them to get away with it. that will become problematic when the car drives its self home to privet property. What they will try to do next it want some way to disable the automations, to turn off the auto controls on the cars, which will lead to court battles over peoples rights to their privet property laws. also, cars do not need licenses to drive and do not break laws as humans do to where they can be arrested. also if the police can shut down or control other peoples cars it opens the doorway for criminals to do the same to other civilians cars they intend to rob. much conflict of interest there. the next decade or two is going to get interesting when it comes to automations.


Do you think, if a self-driving car commits a traffic violation, the car can be/should be ticketed? Or should the owner/manufacturer/programmer be responsible?



AspergianMutantt
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02 Oct 2016, 2:33 pm

ZenDen wrote:
AspergianMutantt wrote:
They made it legal for automated cars now, in California. I cant wait to see in the news where the police arrest someone expecting to impound their cars, only to see the cars drive them selves home. what are they going to do? tell the car to pull over? police like searching the cars they impound, its a warrentless way for them to get away with it. that will become problematic when the car drives its self home to privet property. What they will try to do next it want some way to disable the automations, to turn off the auto controls on the cars, which will lead to court battles over peoples rights to their privet property laws. also, cars do not need licenses to drive and do not break laws as humans do to where they can be arrested. also if the police can shut down or control other peoples cars it opens the doorway for criminals to do the same to other civilians cars they intend to rob. much conflict of interest there. the next decade or two is going to get interesting when it comes to automations.


Do you think, if a self-driving car commits a traffic violation, the car can be/should be ticketed? Or should the owner/manufacturer/programmer be responsible?


Depends on If the car at the time is being human driven or automated, if auto driven then the Programmer, BUT in the instance I before mentioned the owner would have had to given the order, before or during the detainment or arrest, for the car to go home, the courts would take this out on the owner.

Although the odds are the manufacturers will have sales agreements not to be held responsible, so the courts will end up having to go after the owner instead, then have the owners sue the manufacturer. which wont happen that often for simple traffic violations where it would just be simpler and cheaper to just pay the courts the fines.


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ZenDen
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03 Oct 2016, 10:55 am

AspergianMutantt wrote:
ZenDen wrote:
AspergianMutantt wrote:
They made it legal for automated cars now, in California. I cant wait to see in the news where the police arrest someone expecting to impound their cars, only to see the cars drive them selves home. what are they going to do? tell the car to pull over? police like searching the cars they impound, its a warrentless way for them to get away with it. that will become problematic when the car drives its self home to privet property. What they will try to do next it want some way to disable the automations, to turn off the auto controls on the cars, which will lead to court battles over peoples rights to their privet property laws. also, cars do not need licenses to drive and do not break laws as humans do to where they can be arrested. also if the police can shut down or control other peoples cars it opens the doorway for criminals to do the same to other civilians cars they intend to rob. much conflict of interest there. the next decade or two is going to get interesting when it comes to automations.


Do you think, if a self-driving car commits a traffic violation, the car can be/should be ticketed? Or should the owner/manufacturer/programmer be responsible?


Depends on If the car at the time is being human driven or automated, if auto driven then the Programmer, BUT in the instance I before mentioned the owner would have had to given the order, before or during the detainment or arrest, for the car to go home, the courts would take this out on the owner.

Although the odds are the manufacturers will have sales agreements not to be held responsible, so the courts will end up having to go after the owner instead, then have the owners sue the manufacturer. which wont happen that often for simple traffic violations where it would just be simpler and cheaper to just pay the courts the fines.


".....if auto driven then the Programmer,..." ...Probably will be problematic because this could potentially leave a programmer liable for literally millions of offences.

Although "...the manufacturers will have sales agreements not to be held responsible,..." none are enforceable if it can be proved there was manufacturer negligence involved.

You're right about not pursuing a small case in court, but if there is an obvious trend involved, perhaps the courts would entertain class action suits???

The damage to individuals can damage them far more than a mere fine. If an incorrect turn causes a collision then responsibility becomes far greater...or possibly someone losing their license because of previous infractions???

The manufacturers will have quite a reckoning when the day comes...as it no doubt will.