Aspie ordered to have bowel surgery against his wishes

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ASPartOfMe
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26 Feb 2017, 3:04 am

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The man in his 20s, who has Asperger's syndrome, has been told he must have an operation to treat ulcerative colitis by a judge in a specialist court.

The judge said he was satisfied that the man lacked the mental capacity to make decisions about treatment and satisfied that surgery was in the man's best interests.


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CockneyRebel
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26 Feb 2017, 5:48 am

There is no justice in that justice system. What makes the judge so sure that this man was unable to to make his own decisions. Too bad the people of that court can't be sued.


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League_Girl
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26 Feb 2017, 1:04 pm

Okay does that man have an intellectual impairment and why would someone refuse surgery?


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26 Feb 2017, 1:51 pm

Hmmmmm. That could have been me and my UC some years ago. I chose to battle it out using drugs and diet/activity modification. It worked for me.
The surgery consists of the complete removal of the large intestine and since ulcerative colitis is only involved with the large intestine it is considered a total cure. Problem is for the rest of your life you poop into a little plastic bag. Now they've developed another surgery creating a little pouch internally but this is nothing like leading a normal life. I'm pleased I haven't had the surgery. Everyone should have the choice.



Tawaki
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26 Feb 2017, 2:03 pm

League_Girl wrote:
Okay does that man have an intellectual impairment and why would someone refuse surgery?


Lots of people refuse surgery.

If you are looking at a colostomy/ileostomy bag after surgery, some people would rather take their chances of infection or who knows what else than the above. Even if it is a temporary thing.

The surgery could be taking out a small part of the bad colon. It could be that with a temporary or a permanent colostomy bag. Sometimes the doctors don't know until they start digging. You may go in for laperscoptic surgery and wake up with tubes and all sorts of stuff hanging off of you.

I don't know how "well" he followed his treatment plan. Sometimes UC can be controlled by diet. Maybe he didn't have to mental compacity to follow a complicated medical regiment.

On the surface this is a *oh no, clutches pearls article*. Considering how NHS hates spending a dime on anyone, I figure the guy was pretty sick.



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26 Feb 2017, 3:40 pm

ZenDen wrote:
Hmmmmm. That could have been me and my UC some years ago. I chose to battle it out using drugs and diet/activity modification. It worked for me.
The surgery consists of the complete removal of the large intestine and since ulcerative colitis is only involved with the large intestine it is considered a total cure. Problem is for the rest of your life you poop into a little plastic bag. Now they've developed another surgery creating a little pouch internally but this is nothing like leading a normal life. I'm pleased I haven't had the surgery. Everyone should have the choice.


I'd prefer to take my chances with diet and medication to having to poop in a bag for the rest of my life.


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