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Tim_Tex
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04 Jul 2017, 4:32 pm

As a Lutheran in a state that's half Catholic, half Southern Baptist, I agree with you, Kara.


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04 Jul 2017, 4:53 pm

karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
I think religious fundamentalism is the most dangerous aspect of American culture. It teaches people to hate and to oppress. Ironically, if that Jesus guy were still around I think the misguided nature of it would make him cry. Whatever happened to "love thy neighbour" and "judge not lest ye be judged"?


Now that i am living in the US and experiencing it on a daily basis i can certainly understand this more than ever. I have heard a lot of horror stories about people trying to excuse their hatred with a distorted version of their religion, but now, as a German who looks middle-eastern and speaks English with an unidentifiable accent, i can surely tell you that i have already seen some of this happening with me on the receiving end.


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04 Jul 2017, 4:57 pm

Mr.Robot wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
I think religious fundamentalism is the most dangerous aspect of American culture. It teaches people to hate and to oppress. Ironically, if that Jesus guy were still around I think the misguided nature of it would make him cry. Whatever happened to "love thy neighbour" and "judge not lest ye be judged"?


Now that i am living in the US and experiencing it on a daily basis i can certainly understand this more than ever. I have heard a lot of horror stories about people trying to excuse their hatred with a distorted version of their religion, but now, as a German who looks middle-eastern and speaks English with an unidentifiable accent, i can surely tell you that i have already seen some of this happening with me on the receiving end.


What part of Deutschland do you hail from, if I may ask?


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karathraceandherspecialdestiny
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04 Jul 2017, 5:04 pm

Mr.Robot wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
I think religious fundamentalism is the most dangerous aspect of American culture. It teaches people to hate and to oppress. Ironically, if that Jesus guy were still around I think the misguided nature of it would make him cry. Whatever happened to "love thy neighbour" and "judge not lest ye be judged"?


Now that i am living in the US and experiencing it on a daily basis i can certainly understand this more than ever. I have heard a lot of horror stories about people trying to excuse their hatred with a distorted version of their religion, but now, as a German who looks middle-eastern and speaks English with an unidentifiable accent, i can surely tell you that i have already seen some of this happening with me on the receiving end.


We're having our own small-scale issue with this in Canada too. I think it's more prevalent out west (Alberta mostly, the "wild rose" party and all that, our own little Bible belt) than where I live, and it's not as extensive as it is in the states but it is still an issue. I think you see it more in the rural areas where the majority population is still Caucasian people of European descent, less so in the more diverse and heavily populated areas (like in Southern Ontario where I live, where lots of new immigrants settle.)

Sorry you're experiencing that bigotry first hand, that has to be dispiriting.

My hope is that people will move away from religious fundamentalism naturally as public education improves. The thing is to improve public education and to get more people to put their kids in the public school system rather than religious school or home-schooling so they won't get brainwashed by bigoted religion before they have a chance to learn how to think for themselves.



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04 Jul 2017, 5:56 pm

karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
Mr.Robot wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
I think religious fundamentalism is the most dangerous aspect of American culture. It teaches people to hate and to oppress. Ironically, if that Jesus guy were still around I think the misguided nature of it would make him cry. Whatever happened to "love thy neighbour" and "judge not lest ye be judged"?


Now that i am living in the US and experiencing it on a daily basis i can certainly understand this more than ever. I have heard a lot of horror stories about people trying to excuse their hatred with a distorted version of their religion, but now, as a German who looks middle-eastern and speaks English with an unidentifiable accent, i can surely tell you that i have already seen some of this happening with me on the receiving end.


We're having our own small-scale issue with this in Canada too. I think it's more prevalent out west (Alberta mostly, the "wild rose" party and all that, our own little Bible belt) than where I live, and it's not as extensive as it is in the states but it is still an issue. I think you see it more in the rural areas where the majority population is still Caucasian people of European descent, less so in the more diverse and heavily populated areas (like in Southern Ontario where I live, where lots of new immigrants settle.)

Sorry you're experiencing that bigotry first hand, that has to be dispiriting.

My hope is that people will move away from religious fundamentalism naturally as public education improves. The thing is to improve public education and to get more people to put their kids in the public school system rather than religious school or home-schooling so they won't get brainwashed by bigoted religion before they have a chance to learn how to think for themselves.


It was pretty devastating at first, but i have gotten used to it fairly quickly, unfortunately! We have this religious fundamentalism still going on in parts of Bavaria, so it is not that much of a surprise that some people would act the same way in the US. Some of my in-laws in fact represent the intolerant and ignorant part of the American people quite well. I already had more than one dispute with them about religious freedom, racism, etc.

Believe me when i say that seeing this happen after moving to another CONTINENT is pretty heart-breaking, considering the fact that it was a very tough process to get through in order to get me here.


@Kraichgauer: I was born in Thuringia, but grew up in Franconia.


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karathraceandherspecialdestiny
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04 Jul 2017, 6:18 pm

Mr.Robot wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
Mr.Robot wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
I think religious fundamentalism is the most dangerous aspect of American culture. It teaches people to hate and to oppress. Ironically, if that Jesus guy were still around I think the misguided nature of it would make him cry. Whatever happened to "love thy neighbour" and "judge not lest ye be judged"?


Now that i am living in the US and experiencing it on a daily basis i can certainly understand this more than ever. I have heard a lot of horror stories about people trying to excuse their hatred with a distorted version of their religion, but now, as a German who looks middle-eastern and speaks English with an unidentifiable accent, i can surely tell you that i have already seen some of this happening with me on the receiving end.


We're having our own small-scale issue with this in Canada too. I think it's more prevalent out west (Alberta mostly, the "wild rose" party and all that, our own little Bible belt) than where I live, and it's not as extensive as it is in the states but it is still an issue. I think you see it more in the rural areas where the majority population is still Caucasian people of European descent, less so in the more diverse and heavily populated areas (like in Southern Ontario where I live, where lots of new immigrants settle.)

Sorry you're experiencing that bigotry first hand, that has to be dispiriting.

My hope is that people will move away from religious fundamentalism naturally as public education improves. The thing is to improve public education and to get more people to put their kids in the public school system rather than religious school or home-schooling so they won't get brainwashed by bigoted religion before they have a chance to learn how to think for themselves.


It was pretty devastating at first, but i have gotten used to it fairly quickly, unfortunately! We have this religious fundamentalism still going on in parts of Bavaria, so it is not that much of a surprise that some people would act the same way in the US. Some of my in-laws in fact represent the intolerant and ignorant part of the American people quite well. I already had more than one dispute with them about religious freedom, racism, etc.

Believe me when i say that seeing this happen after moving to another CONTINENT is pretty heart-breaking, considering the fact that it was a very tough process to get through in order to get me here.


@Kraichgauer: I was born in Thuringia, but grew up in Franconia.


Bigotry of one form or another is an inescapably universal (if dark) aspect of humanity, it would seem. But altruism is too, we mustn't forget that. I take comfort in the idea that biologically and evolutionarily speaking, altruism makes more sense in a species that lives in such large groups like humans do. Looking out for each other is Mother Nature's wisdom, and because of that I believe it will eventually win out. This is how I try to maintain my optimism.



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04 Jul 2017, 7:09 pm

karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
Bigotry of one form or another is an inescapably universal (if dark) aspect of humanity, it would seem. But altruism is too, we mustn't forget that. I take comfort in the idea that biologically and evolutionarily speaking, altruism makes more sense in a species that lives in such large groups like humans do. Looking out for each other is Mother Nature's wisdom, and because of that I believe it will eventually win out. This is how I try to maintain my optimism.


This is a good way of maintaining optimism. I have to admit that i am doing it the same way. Without it, i certainly would have given up already.

Thank you for the positive outlook! I tend to catastrophize whenever i perceive ignorance.


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04 Jul 2017, 7:21 pm

Wonderful news!

Image



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04 Jul 2017, 10:27 pm

karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
Lintar wrote:
This isn't 'marriage', but an outrage, an abomination, the work of the Devil!

Nothing to celebrate here. The world truly is going mad when such nonsense is tolerated and promoted. :evil:


So what are the forum rules on homophobia? I noticed there is an LGBTQ section and I imagine a good sized amount of autistic LGBTQ members here, so I would imagine (and would hope) blatant homophobia is not acceptable as it would make those members not feel very good. This sort of attitude is should have died out with the last century. God doesn't hate gay people, only ignorant humans who are afraid of difference do that--and you wouldn't expect to find people who are afraid of difference in a place full of it like a forum for autistic people.

Maybe this is sarcasm and I missed it?


Define 'homophobia'. A phobia is defined as being a fear, and I am certainly not afraid of homosexuals. I disagree with what they do, because I believe it to be wrong for a number of reasons.

As for there being 'forum rules' that prevent disagreement with the party line on certain issues (like this one), well, if I am censored or banned that will merely confirm the belief that I, and others, have that such topics are forbidden from being openly discussed precisely because an open examination of it would reveal weaknesses in the arguments that are put forth by those who campaign for things like this.



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04 Jul 2017, 10:32 pm

Butterfly88 wrote:
Wonderful news!

Image


Don't people feel shame anymore? About anything? I'm just asking, by the way, not being 'homophobic' (whatever the hell that means) because I've noticed that since approximately the late 1980's/early 1990's it has been one of those words that has simply fallen out of use. I've noticed that people (especially the young) just don't seem to feel it, or, if they do, they never discuss it.



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04 Jul 2017, 10:36 pm

Wearing blended fabrics which dishonor their father and mother? Stone them!


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04 Jul 2017, 10:47 pm

Mr.Robot wrote:
Lintar wrote:
This isn't 'marriage', but an outrage, an abomination, the work of the Devil!

Nothing to celebrate here. The world truly is going mad when such nonsense is tolerated and promoted. :evil:


I hope this is sarcasm! If not, then let me tell you something to make that clear for you: Du verstehst Homosexualität ebenso wenig wie das Geschriebene hier, hasst du also automatisch auch die deutsche Sprache? Nein? Richtig, das wäre nämlich ohne Sinn.

You cannot hate something you don't understand. Leave sexual orientation out of this for it is none of your business!

And i actually thought that on a page like this i might not have to deal with questionable agendas like this since most of the individuals on here have faced enough ignorance for being different than the norm.


a) "You cannot hate something you don't understand" - This is debatable, to say the least. If, for example, a change in policy and/or the law has an impact upon how a particular society functions, then even if I don't fully understand the implications of this change I can still safely say that I have the right to express my opinion on that particular policy and/or law, especially if there are some clear consequences that will inevitably arise from the proposed change(s).

b) "Leave sexual orientation out of this for it is none of your business!" - It's everyone's business, for the reason stated above. It is now verboten for people in Australia (a nation that is, unfortunately, even more 'progressive' than much of Europe) to openly express their personal views regarding this, and many other, issues. You may be familiar with what happened to Margaret Court recently. All she did was state her views when asked, and she gave them honestly, but for doing so she was practically crucified by the loony left for it. I thought the Western 'democracies' allowed for dissenting views, views that go against the perceived consensus? Apparently not.

c) "I hope this is sarcasm" - No, it isn't.



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04 Jul 2017, 10:51 pm

jrjones9933 wrote:
Wearing blended fabrics which dishonor their father and mother? Stone them!


Well, wearing cotton with synthetic fibres is just tacky, so it's a good thing that God doesn't allow it.



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05 Jul 2017, 12:19 am

Mr.Robot wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
Mr.Robot wrote:
karathraceandherspecialdestiny wrote:
I think religious fundamentalism is the most dangerous aspect of American culture. It teaches people to hate and to oppress. Ironically, if that Jesus guy were still around I think the misguided nature of it would make him cry. Whatever happened to "love thy neighbour" and "judge not lest ye be judged"?


Now that i am living in the US and experiencing it on a daily basis i can certainly understand this more than ever. I have heard a lot of horror stories about people trying to excuse their hatred with a distorted version of their religion, but now, as a German who looks middle-eastern and speaks English with an unidentifiable accent, i can surely tell you that i have already seen some of this happening with me on the receiving end.


We're having our own small-scale issue with this in Canada too. I think it's more prevalent out west (Alberta mostly, the "wild rose" party and all that, our own little Bible belt) than where I live, and it's not as extensive as it is in the states but it is still an issue. I think you see it more in the rural areas where the majority population is still Caucasian people of European descent, less so in the more diverse and heavily populated areas (like in Southern Ontario where I live, where lots of new immigrants settle.)

Sorry you're experiencing that bigotry first hand, that has to be dispiriting.

My hope is that people will move away from religious fundamentalism naturally as public education improves. The thing is to improve public education and to get more people to put their kids in the public school system rather than religious school or home-schooling so they won't get brainwashed by bigoted religion before they have a chance to learn how to think for themselves.


It was pretty devastating at first, but i have gotten used to it fairly quickly, unfortunately! We have this religious fundamentalism still going on in parts of Bavaria, so it is not that much of a surprise that some people would act the same way in the US. Some of my in-laws in fact represent the intolerant and ignorant part of the American people quite well. I already had more than one dispute with them about religious freedom, racism, etc.

Believe me when i say that seeing this happen after moving to another CONTINENT is pretty heart-breaking, considering the fact that it was a very tough process to get through in order to get me here.


@Kraichgauer: I was born in Thuringia, but grew up in Franconia.


Thanks, Mr Robot.
I'm a more than a few generations away from Deutschland, though my dad's people way back when had been Black Sea Germans, originally from the Kurpfalz (the middle Franconian speaking area of modern day northwest Baden-Wurttemberg) back in the Napoleonic era. My mom's people had been Prussians and Bavarians back in the late 19th century; and yes, their in-laws hated each other.


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envirozentinel
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05 Jul 2017, 3:06 am

Lintar wrote:
jrjones9933 wrote:
Wearing blended fabrics which dishonor their father and mother? Stone them!


Well, wearing cotton with synthetic fibres is just tacky, so it's a good thing that God doesn't allow it.


It must be sarcasm this time... :)


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05 Jul 2017, 3:11 am

Lintar wrote:
Butterfly88 wrote:
Wonderful news!

Image


Don't people feel shame anymore? About anything? I'm just asking, by the way, not being 'homophobic' (whatever the hell that means) because I've noticed that since approximately the late 1980's/early 1990's it has been one of those words that has simply fallen out of use. I've noticed that people (especially the young) just don't seem to feel it, or, if they do, they never discuss it.



Shame is something you should feel when you've wronged or hurt somebody and ought to apologise for your behaviour towards them. There are certainly times one should feel shame. What about those cyber bullies who caused certain young folk to take their own lives? What about people who have showed blatant racism or sexism? The new US president doesn't set a good example to any youth as he doesn't feel any shame at his sexist and misogynistic remarks. Total egotists don't show any shame.


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