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ASPartOfMe
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20 Nov 2018, 5:21 pm

Trump says no new Saudi punishment for Khashoggi murder

Quote:
President Donald Trump said Tuesday the U.S. will not punish Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at this time nor cut arms sales to Saudi Arabia for the killing of U.S.-based columnist Jamal Khashoggi.

Trump called the killing of Khashoggi inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul a "horrible crime" that the U.S. does not condone, but said Saudi Arabia is a "great ally" and canceling billions in arms sales would only benefit China and Russia, which would be glad to step in and make the sales.

U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that bin Salman, the kingdom's de factor leader, ordered the Oct. 2 killing, according to a U.S. official familiar with the assessment. Others familiar with the case caution that while it's likely that the crown prince had a role in the death there continue to be questions about the degree to which he was involved.

The U.S. earlier sanctioned 17 Saudi officials suspected of being responsible for or complicit in the killing, but members of Congress have called for harsher actions.

Trump said Tuesday in his statement that the king of Saudi Arabia and the crown prince "vigorously deny" any knowledge of the planning or execution of the murder of Khashoggi.

"Our intelligence agencies continue to assess all information, but it could very well be that the crown prince had knowledge of this tragic event — maybe he did and maybe he didn't!" Trump said.

"That being said, we may never know all of the facts surrounding the murder of Mr. Jamal Khashoggi. In any case, our relationship is with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. They have been a great ally in our very important fight against Iran."

He said the United States intends to remain a steadfast partner of Saudi Arabia to ensure the interests of the United States. "America First!" he wrote.

France's top diplomat said Monday that his country was mulling sanctions against Saudi Arabia. And Germany on Monday announced that it has banned 18 Saudi nationals from entering Europe's border-free Schengen zone because of their suspected connections to the killing. German officials, who earlier banned new weapons exports to Riyadh, also said they were halting previously approved arms exports.

Kushner, the president's son-in-law, has worked with the crown prince on various issues, including on how to end the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.


Further proof America is a client state of Saudi Arabia.


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thoughtbeast
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20 Nov 2018, 7:19 pm

Vultures of a feather fly together.



VegetableMan
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20 Nov 2018, 7:48 pm

As long as a country has something we need, we could care less what they do. Beheadings? No problem! Kill some journalists? Wonderful! Stone a few women? Enjoy! That's fine! You do whatever you want and have a good time doing it! Just keep the oil coming!


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thoughtbeast
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20 Nov 2018, 8:18 pm

VegetableMan wrote:
As long as a country has something we need, we could care less what they do. Beheadings? No problem! Kill some journalists? Wonderful! Stone a few women? Enjoy! That's fine! You do whatever you want and have a good time doing it! Just keep the oil coming!


Trump's statement was nothing less than deplorable:

Trump's Saudi support highlights brutality of 'America First' doctrine

Quote:
It is the Trump doctrine laid bare.

By letting Saudi Arabia get away with the murder of US-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the President sent a message of startling clarity about how the United States will conduct its business in the world.

Refusing to break with Saudi strongman Mohammed bin Salman over the killing in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Trump effectively told global despots that if they side with him -- Washington will turn a blind eye to actions that infringe traditional US values.

But more than that, by stressing the "billions" of dollars in Saudi investment in the US, Trump made clear that Washington has a price, that principles that generations of Americans have cherished, are for sale.

"The world is a very dangerous place! ... It's called America First!" Trump wrote in a statement, effectively repudiating the concept of American Exceptionalism, the idea that the US is embarked on a unique, moral mission exemplified by support for freedom, democracy and universal values.

The President's decision Tuesday to answer the long-running question of how he will respond to the murder of the Washington Post columnist revealed other pillars of the Trump doctrine in one of the most colloquial and oddly stylistic statements on US foreign policy ever written.

It showed a President willing to ignore and prejudge US intelligence assessments that conflict with his political goals.

His readiness to offer impunity to Saudi Arabia represented another blow to the international rule of law and global accountability, concepts Trump has shown little desire to enforce in nearly two years in office.

The President's statement is certain to trigger a fierce clash with Congress, where there is bipartisan momentum to punish Saudi Arabia.

Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, blasted Trump's response.

"I never thought I'd see the day a White House would moonlight as a public relations firm for the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia," he tweeted on Tuesday.

And it may deepen the estrangement between Trump and the intelligence community, given his rejection of a CIA assessment that the crown prince knew about the killing of Khashoggi.

Trump's statement was remarkable because it was not just an explanation of Saudi policy. He consciously used the moment to deliver a lesson about how he would wield American power as he redefined the nation's role in the world.

He essentially argued that although the murder of the Washington Post journalist was "terrible" and could not be condoned, it did not merit the disruption of a strategic relationship he has elevated to extraordinary levels.

"We're not going to give up hundreds of millions of dollars in orders and let Russia and China have them ... it's a very simple equation for me. I'm about make America great again," he told reporters ...



VegetableMan
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20 Nov 2018, 8:26 pm

thoughtbeast wrote:
VegetableMan wrote:
As long as a country has something we need, we could care less what they do. Beheadings? No problem! Kill some journalists? Wonderful! Stone a few women? Enjoy! That's fine! You do whatever you want and have a good time doing it! Just keep the oil coming!


Trump's statement was nothing less than deplorable:

Trump's Saudi support highlights brutality of 'America First' doctrine

Quote:
It is the Trump doctrine laid bare.

By letting Saudi Arabia get away with the murder of US-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the President sent a message of startling clarity about how the United States will conduct its business in the world.

Refusing to break with Saudi strongman Mohammed bin Salman over the killing in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Trump effectively told global despots that if they side with him -- Washington will turn a blind eye to actions that infringe traditional US values.

But more than that, by stressing the "billions" of dollars in Saudi investment in the US, Trump made clear that Washington has a price, that principles that generations of Americans have cherished, are for sale.

"The world is a very dangerous place! ... It's called America First!" Trump wrote in a statement, effectively repudiating the concept of American Exceptionalism, the idea that the US is embarked on a unique, moral mission exemplified by support for freedom, democracy and universal values.

The President's decision Tuesday to answer the long-running question of how he will respond to the murder of the Washington Post columnist revealed other pillars of the Trump doctrine in one of the most colloquial and oddly stylistic statements on US foreign policy ever written.

It showed a President willing to ignore and prejudge US intelligence assessments that conflict with his political goals.

His readiness to offer impunity to Saudi Arabia represented another blow to the international rule of law and global accountability, concepts Trump has shown little desire to enforce in nearly two years in office.

The President's statement is certain to trigger a fierce clash with Congress, where there is bipartisan momentum to punish Saudi Arabia.

Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, blasted Trump's response.

"I never thought I'd see the day a White House would moonlight as a public relations firm for the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia," he tweeted on Tuesday.

And it may deepen the estrangement between Trump and the intelligence community, given his rejection of a CIA assessment that the crown prince knew about the killing of Khashoggi.

Trump's statement was remarkable because it was not just an explanation of Saudi policy. He consciously used the moment to deliver a lesson about how he would wield American power as he redefined the nation's role in the world.

He essentially argued that although the murder of the Washington Post journalist was "terrible" and could not be condoned, it did not merit the disruption of a strategic relationship he has elevated to extraordinary levels.

"We're not going to give up hundreds of millions of dollars in orders and let Russia and China have them ... it's a very simple equation for me. I'm about make America great again," he told reporters ...



I'm assuming you were every bit as upset during the Obama administration when the U.S. turned a blind eye to the atrocities being committed in Saudi Arabia. I mean, you must have been on internet forums condemning him with equal amount of vitriol as you have for Trump, yes?


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B19
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20 Nov 2018, 10:07 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
Trump says no new Saudi punishment for Khashoggi murder
Quote:
President Donald Trump said Tuesday the U.S. will not punish Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman at this time nor cut arms sales to Saudi Arabia for the killing of U.S.-based columnist Jamal Khashoggi.

Trump called the killing of Khashoggi inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul a "horrible crime" that the U.S. does not condone, but said Saudi Arabia is a "great ally" and canceling billions in arms sales would only benefit China and Russia, which would be glad to step in and make the sales.

U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that bin Salman, the kingdom's de factor leader, ordered the Oct. 2 killing, according to a U.S. official familiar with the assessment. Others familiar with the case caution that while it's likely that the crown prince had a role in the death there continue to be questions about the degree to which he was involved.

The U.S. earlier sanctioned 17 Saudi officials suspected of being responsible for or complicit in the killing, but members of Congress have called for harsher actions.

Trump said Tuesday in his statement that the king of Saudi Arabia and the crown prince "vigorously deny" any knowledge of the planning or execution of the murder of Khashoggi.

"Our intelligence agencies continue to assess all information, but it could very well be that the crown prince had knowledge of this tragic event — maybe he did and maybe he didn't!" Trump said.

"That being said, we may never know all of the facts surrounding the murder of Mr. Jamal Khashoggi. In any case, our relationship is with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. They have been a great ally in our very important fight against Iran."

He said the United States intends to remain a steadfast partner of Saudi Arabia to ensure the interests of the United States. "America First!" he wrote.

France's top diplomat said Monday that his country was mulling sanctions against Saudi Arabia. And Germany on Monday announced that it has banned 18 Saudi nationals from entering Europe's border-free Schengen zone because of their suspected connections to the killing. German officials, who earlier banned new weapons exports to Riyadh, also said they were halting previously approved arms exports.

Kushner, the president's son-in-law, has worked with the crown prince on various issues, including on how to end the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.


Further proof America is a client state of Saudi Arabia.


Trump always considers his self interest first, not the USA's. He has benefited personally to a great extent financially from the Saudis, they and the Russian Mafia Oligrarchs are his biggest property buyers, and Trump Tower is their base in USA. This underlies his so-called presidential decisions to a great extent.

I wonder if anyone else has noticed that the two biggest smirkers in international politics are Mr Bone Saw and Trump- another bad sign, IMO. Habitual smirkers reveal their true character in that expression, never trust a smirker, they are generally very bad people. It's a characteristic particularly notable in sociopaths. Beware.

https://www.politifact.com/truth-o-mete ... s-saudi-a/



thoughtbeast
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21 Nov 2018, 12:54 am

VegetableMan wrote:
thoughtbeast wrote:
VegetableMan wrote:
As long as a country has something we need, we could care less what they do. Beheadings? No problem! Kill some journalists? Wonderful! Stone a few women? Enjoy! That's fine! You do whatever you want and have a good time doing it! Just keep the oil coming!


Trump's statement was nothing less than deplorable:

Trump's Saudi support highlights brutality of 'America First' doctrine

Quote:
It is the Trump doctrine laid bare.

By letting Saudi Arabia get away with the murder of US-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the President sent a message of startling clarity about how the United States will conduct its business in the world.

Refusing to break with Saudi strongman Mohammed bin Salman over the killing in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Trump effectively told global despots that if they side with him -- Washington will turn a blind eye to actions that infringe traditional US values.

But more than that, by stressing the "billions" of dollars in Saudi investment in the US, Trump made clear that Washington has a price, that principles that generations of Americans have cherished, are for sale.

"The world is a very dangerous place! ... It's called America First!" Trump wrote in a statement, effectively repudiating the concept of American Exceptionalism, the idea that the US is embarked on a unique, moral mission exemplified by support for freedom, democracy and universal values.

The President's decision Tuesday to answer the long-running question of how he will respond to the murder of the Washington Post columnist revealed other pillars of the Trump doctrine in one of the most colloquial and oddly stylistic statements on US foreign policy ever written.

It showed a President willing to ignore and prejudge US intelligence assessments that conflict with his political goals.

His readiness to offer impunity to Saudi Arabia represented another blow to the international rule of law and global accountability, concepts Trump has shown little desire to enforce in nearly two years in office.

The President's statement is certain to trigger a fierce clash with Congress, where there is bipartisan momentum to punish Saudi Arabia.

Republican Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, blasted Trump's response.

"I never thought I'd see the day a White House would moonlight as a public relations firm for the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia," he tweeted on Tuesday.

And it may deepen the estrangement between Trump and the intelligence community, given his rejection of a CIA assessment that the crown prince knew about the killing of Khashoggi.

Trump's statement was remarkable because it was not just an explanation of Saudi policy. He consciously used the moment to deliver a lesson about how he would wield American power as he redefined the nation's role in the world.

He essentially argued that although the murder of the Washington Post journalist was "terrible" and could not be condoned, it did not merit the disruption of a strategic relationship he has elevated to extraordinary levels.

"We're not going to give up hundreds of millions of dollars in orders and let Russia and China have them ... it's a very simple equation for me. I'm about make America great again," he told reporters ...



I'm assuming you were every bit as upset during the Obama administration when the U.S. turned a blind eye to the atrocities being committed in Saudi Arabia. I mean, you must have been on internet forums condemning him with equal amount of vitriol as you have for Trump, yes?


Whataboutism - the last refuge of a Trump supporter.



Biscuitman
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21 Nov 2018, 3:30 am

Trump just now: “I don’t make deals with Saudi Arabia. I don’t have money from Saudi Arabia. I have nothing to do with Saudi Arabia.”

Trump in August 2015: “Saudi Arabia, I get along with all of them. They buy apartments from me. They spend $40 million, $50 million.”

:lol: