Republicans groan/boo Ocasio-Cortez and only Ocasio-Cortez

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auntblabby
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08 Jan 2019, 3:59 am

Kraichgauer wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
Kraichgauer wrote:
As if unregulated capitalism has ever helped anyone besides the 1%.

there is just no getting through to people who have swallowed hook line and sinker, the supply side cool aid.


Maybe there is, as David Stockman, of all people, came to realize the truth of the supply side poison he had been peddling.

he felt his mortality creeping up on him, is all, and discovered guilt.



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08 Jan 2019, 5:03 am

auntblabby wrote:
Kraichgauer wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
Kraichgauer wrote:
As if unregulated capitalism has ever helped anyone besides the 1%.

there is just no getting through to people who have swallowed hook line and sinker, the supply side cool aid.


Maybe there is, as David Stockman, of all people, came to realize the truth of the supply side poison he had been peddling.

he felt his mortality creeping up on him, is all, and discovered guilt.


Maybe so.


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15 Jan 2019, 3:46 pm

Exasperated Democrats try to rein in Ocasio-Cortez

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is already making enemies in the House Democratic Caucus — and some of its members are mounting an operation to bring the anti-establishment, democratic socialist with 2.2 million Twitter followers into the fold.

The effort, described by nearly 20 lawmakers and aides, is part carrot, part stick: Some lawmakers with ties to Ocasio-Cortez are hoping to coax her into using her star power to unite Democrats and turn her fire on Republicans. Others simultaneously warn Ocasio-Cortez is destined for a lonely, ineffectual career in Congress if she continues to treat her own party as the enemy

I’m sure Ms. Cortez means well, but there’s almost an outstanding rule: Don’t attack your own people,” said Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.). “We just don’t need sniping in our Democratic Caucus.”

Incumbent Democrats are most annoyed by Ocasio-Cortez’s threat to back primary opponents against members of their ranks she deems too moderate. But their frustration goes beyond that: Democratic leaders are upset that she railed against their new set of House rules on Twitter the first week of the new Congress. Rank and file are peeved that there’s a grassroots movement to try to win her a top committee post they feel she doesn’t deserve.

Even some progressives who admire AOC, as she’s nicknamed, told POLITICO that they worry she’s not using her notoriety effectively.

“She needs to decide: Does she want to be an effective legislator or just continue being a Twitter star?” said one House Democrat who’s in lockstep with Ocasio Cortez’s ideology. “There’s a difference between being an activist and a lawmaker in Congress.”

It’s an open question whether Ocasio-Cortez can be checked. She’s barely been in Congress a week and is better known than almost any other House member other than Nancy Pelosi and John Lewis. A media throng follows her every move, and she can command a national audience practically at will.

None of that came playing by the usual rules: Indeed, Ocasio-Cortez’s willingness to take on her party establishment with unconventional guerrilla tactics is what got her here. It’s earned her icon status on the progressive left, it’s where the 29-year-old freshman derives her power — and, by every indication, it’s how she thinks she can pull the Democratic Party in her direction.

The Freedom Caucus didn’t win many popularity contests in Congress the past four years, but it’s hard to dispute the hard-liners’ success dragging the GOP to the right.

Still, fellow Democrats are giving it their best, or planning to in the near future.

So far, most of them have kept their criticism of Ocasio-Cortez private, fearful she’ll sic her massive following on them by firing off a tweet. But a few are engaging with her in the hopes she’ll opt for a different M.O., especially when it comes to trying to take out Democrats in primaries.

Rep. Nydia Velázquez (D-N.Y.) is playing a key role. Like Ocasio-Cortez, Velázquez knocked off a longtime Democratic incumbent to win her seat, and they share Puerto Rican roots.

In private conversations with Ocasio-Cortez over the past few months, Velázquez counseled Ocasio-Cortez against targeting her Democratic colleagues in future elections. The two had a “long, long conversation” about the dynamics of Congress and Washington, and how there shouldn’t be a “litmus test” for every district, Velázquez said in a recent interview.

After she defeated Democratic incumbent Joe Crowley in shocking fashion last year, Ocasio-Cortez supported primary challengers to Democratic Reps. Stephanie Murphy of Florida, William Lacy Clay of Missouri and Mike Capuano of Massachusetts.

Only Capuano lost. But Velázquez told Ocasio-Cortez she should think twice in the future before backing primaries against her colleagues. Murphy, the first Vietnamese woman elected to Congress, represents a swing district and could lose her seat if she’s forced to move left in a primary, Velázquez said during the talk.

“Washington is a political animal where a lot of the work that you want to accomplish depends on relationships within the Democratic Caucus,” said Velázquez, who described herself as a “bridge” between Ocasio-Cortez and the caucus. “The honeymoon between the voters that you represent and yourself could be a short one. People want to see results.”

Other lawmakers agreed.

“I think she needs to give herself an opportunity to know her colleagues and to give herself a sense of the chemistry of the body before passing judgment on anyone or anything,” said Rep. Yvette Clarke, a fellow New York Democrat.

“She’s new here, feeling her way around,” added Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.). “She doesn’t understand how the place works yet.”

Ocasio-Cortez, through her staff, declined to be interviewed for this story. But there are signs that she’s getting the message, at least when it comes to backing primary challenges against her colleagues.

In a brief exchange off the House floor recently, she said she wasn’t interested in backing progressive candidates against incumbent Democrats — contradicting her own words after the midterms. She also criticized POLITICO for publishing a story suggesting she considered backing a primary opponent against rising star Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.), who many believe could become the first black speaker.

Some House Democrats aren’t convinced. They’ve noticed that Ocasio-Cortez has hired two former organizers from the anti-establishment group Justice Democrats to run her office. One of them, her new chief of staff Saikat Chakrabarti, told supporters during a November conference call that “we gotta primary folks.”

Ocasio-Cortez appeared to agree with him during the call, arguing that “all Americans know money in politics is a huge problem, but unfortunately the way that we fix it is by demanding that our incumbents give it up or by running fierce campaigns ourselves.”

“Long story short, I need you to run for office,” she told progressive activists on the call. “That's really what we need to do to save this country.”

Comments like that got Ocasio-Cortez off on the wrong foot with her colleagues, to say the least.

Ocasio-Cortez is an enigma to most House Democrats. She’s very friendly in person, chatting up fellow lawmakers and security workers in the Capitol as she’s tailed by admirers and reporters.

Then they see the Ocasio-Cortez on Twitter, where she frequently snaps at critics and occasionally at fellow Democrats. When House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) told reporters that a new climate committee that Ocasio-Cortez championed would not have subpoena power, she retweeted the news and chastised Democratic leadership.

“Our goal is to treat Climate Change like the serious, existential threat it is by drafting an ambitious solution on the scale necessary — aka a Green New Deal — to get it done,” she said. “A weak committee misses the point & endangers people.”

Two House Democratic sources compared her use of Twitter to Donald Trump’s. Just as congressional Republicans constantly withhold criticism of the president out of fear he’ll unleash a tweet at them, some Democrats have done the same with Ocasio-Cortez.

“People are afraid of her,” said one senior Democratic aide.

Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) predicted that Ocasio-Cortez will soon learn that Republicans are “the real enemy.”

“She will come to the understanding that it’s a better use of her time fighting the Republican Party than her Democratic colleagues who agree with her on green energy,” said Maloney, who called Ocasio-Cortez “very nice” and “very charming.”

Others aren’t so sure. They point to her first week in Congress: Ocasio-Cortez aggravated Democratic leaders and even some fellow progressives when she tweeted that she’d oppose the Democratic rules package, arguing it would stymie liberal priorities like “Medicare for all.”

House Democrats were also unhappy when she made a play for a seat on the powerful Ways and Means Committee. Lawmakers suspected Ocasio-Cortez was behind a massive online campaign pressing Pelosi to appoint her to the panel, though her office said she was not.

Critics inside the caucus felt she didn't deserve it, given her lack of professional experience on tax issues and her status as a freshman.

“It totally pissed off everyone,” said one senior House Democratic lawmaker of the campaign. “You don’t get picked for committees by who your grass-roots [supporters] are.”

But the issue of pushing primaries against Democratic incumbents such as Jeffries, who was recently elected chairman of the Democratic Caucus, is what’s agitated rank-and-file members the most.

But Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.), the former head of the House Progressive Caucus, said Democrats should probably get used to Ocasio-Cortez.


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15 Jan 2019, 4:13 pm

You have to hand it to AOC with the fact that her personality is provocative. Historically, the likelihood that a newly elected congressperson from a particular state, elected by a fairly small margin (14,000 votes) would receive near constant national media attention, would have been close to nil. In regular elections it's simply not routine for a newly elected congressperson in [ pick a state ] to be known by a resident of another state in a different part of the U.S.?

She's going rogue. It will be interesting if the DNC steps in line behind her with support and views her as a de facto leader of "new" generation of the Democratic party or, if they'll be unsupportive of her and either leave her to make it on her own or crash and burn.

She's got a very good grasp of using social media to her advantage. Kudos to her for that. As opposed to Elizabeth Warren co-opting AOC's approach with a beer drinking live stream that was just a painful train wreck to watch.


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Last edited by Magna on 15 Jan 2019, 7:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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15 Jan 2019, 6:59 pm

Doesn’t seem Democrats like her either



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17 Jan 2019, 7:42 pm

You Must Take Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Seriously

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Old-timers will remember the era when getting profiled on 60 Minutes was a cultural laurel almost as impressive as making the cover of Time. It meant you were Somebody! Even so, 60 Minutes can still pack a punch. When the show devoted its first segment of its first show of the new year to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the freshly minted congresswoman from the Bronx and Queens, the buzz in Washington easily lasted for, my heavens, a good half an hour—maybe even an hour. Then we went back to thinking about President Trump.

Let me linger a moment longer on Ocasio-Cortez, or AOC, as her fans, among whom I include myself, call her. Already her “personal story” has become universally known among the politically sentient, and Anderson Cooper shared it with viewers of 60 Minutes, too. It’s a fairy tale for our progressive moment—a Cinderella story as told by Saul Alinsky.

Ocasio-Cortez was born in the Bronx less than 30 years ago to Spanish-speaking parents who met in Puerto Rico. Her father ran a small business; her mother cleaned houses to make ends meet. They bought a modest house in Westchester to spare their little girl the indignities of a Bronx childhood. When the father died, during her sophomore year at Boston University, loans and scholarships allowed Ocasio-Cortez to finish her degree in something called “international relations”—ideal training, as it happened, for her ensuing careers as a community organizer, political gadfly, and bartender. It was the bartending, no surprise, that kept the wolf from the door. When veterans of the Bernie Sanders campaign asked her to undertake a long-shot challenge to a veteran Democratic congressman in the 2018 primary, she said sure.

This average–Joe Millennial narrative helped, but her route to success lay through Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. We are long past the time when politicians pretended to be embarrassed about the “inauthentic” show-biz machinery of image-making and self-promotion. AOC’s use of social media calls to mind Astaire dancing or Rickey Henderson swiping second. It is effortless mastery.

AOC broadcast her campaign in daily, sometimes hourly, installments. And then, during downtime at Starbucks or cooking an Instant Pot dinner in her shoebox apartment, she would speak directly into her phone’s camera and take questions from her rapidly expanding flock of followers (now numbering more than 2 million on each medium).

Once elected, she took them all along with her to what she wittily called Congress Camp—orientation for freshman legislators. She never passed up a chance to be tendentious: She lamented the “painful” sight of statues of patriarchal forebears in Statuary Hall and said the “supernice” grandeur of Washington’s Union Station proved that “infrastructure is worth investing in.” (Noted.) Her dispatches were and are mesmerizing, proselytizing, and normalizing, all at once.

But from the beginning her fans have come for more than politics. AOC is a package deal. She uses her own life story as a lesson in uplift and self-improvement, and the effect is as American as a Gordita Crunch. If she can live the dream, you can too!

Her inevitable gaffes—to use the Washington word—have led some of her political adversaries to think she’s a ditz. A few of her missteps are just the sloppy, wishful thinking of the ideologue, as when she misread a story in the Nation magazine to say that the Pentagon had a pile of misappropriated funds lying around (room number unspecified), totaling $21 trillion. Why oh why, she wondered, couldn’t that money be spent on Medicare for all?

Other mistakes are a symptom of the disability, common among politicians, known as motormouth, as her enthusiasm to explain the world to the rest of us outraces her capacity to choose words properly. Speaking in her mile-a-minute mode on Facebook one evening, she seemed to suggest that the federal government consisted of three chambers, which she later corrected to branches—identified, alas, as the House, the Senate, and the White House

In the world of Washington gaffe-making, this is small potatoes, especially considering that her every word—her every tweet and Facebook share, her every Instagram story and YouTube vid—draws the scrutiny of many million people, fans and detractors alike. Gathered into a little pile, in fact, the gaffes are dwarfed by the mountain of Palinisms that Republicans struggled to ignore a decade ago. AOC is a creature of her time and place, and often the accusations against her amount to little more than that she’s a millennial. As Miller pointed out, that’s what millennials like about her. Before Congress convened, AOC took a week off for what she called “self-care,” and Republicans snorted derision. But that’s the way they talk these days! Besides, when I first began covering Congress, in the 1980s, certain legislators frequently disappeared for a week or two. Their staffs discreetly called it a vacation; the rest of us knew it as “detox.”

AOC shows no signs of substance abuse. Indeed, it’s far more likely that the force of her icy discipline will be mismeasured. You see the discipline in matters large and small. In the way she dramatizes her past, for example: She is careful to speak of lessons learned “when I was scrubbing toilets with my mom.” As house cleaners, she and her mother were probably polishing a lot of pewter sconces too, but she knows which chore hits a nerve in the retelling. When reliably liberal “fact-checkers” slagged her misreading of the Nation article, she had the brass to accuse them of pro-Trump bias, and not a single Democrat did a spit take.

Sexism, too, of course: A dim-witted conservative journalist tweeted a picture of her walking down a hallway stylishly dressed in seemingly pricey couture—his way of zinging the working-class poormouthing that is an essential part of her persona. (She frets that she can’t afford an apartment in Washington.) AOC pretended his intent was salacious. “If I walked into Congress wearing a sack, they would laugh and take a picture of my backside,” she wrote. “If I walk in with my best sale-rack clothes, they laugh and take a picture of my backside.” She’s flattering herself, but the congresswoman knows what she’s doing.

Charisma is a value of the left; it is changeable, sensational, superficial, subrational, and almost always a distraction from what’s essential. It also doesn’t last. I’m not so sure this will hold true in the case of AOC. Already she has proved herself much smarter and less dopey than Republicans and even the establishment media want her to be. It would be better if they dropped the sleuthing, motive-mongering, and flyspecking and did the unthinkable: take her seriously.

“People say you don’t understand how to play the game,” Anderson Cooper said to her on 60 Minutes.

“I think it’s really great for people to keep thinking that,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

“So you want folks to underestimate you?”

“Of course! That’s how I won!”


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21 Jan 2019, 2:08 am

the third generation can't come soon enough.



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23 Feb 2019, 10:15 am

AOC VS. GOP: THE LONG LIST OF SMEARS AND INSULTS HURLED AT ALEXANDRIA OCASIO-CORTEZ

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Making headlines almost daily, New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez might be the most talked about politician in the U.S., second only to President Donald Trump.

Revered by many on the left and loathed by as many on the right, Ocasio-Cortez, 29, has faced unrelenting scrutiny since she first launched her grassroots 2018 electoral campaign against 10-term incumbent Joe Crowley. And in the weeks since Ocasio-Cortez took office, the spotlight has only shined brighter on the self-described democratic socialist, with the criticism of her growing more intense.

This week, Ocasio-Cortez's detractors went so far as to pay for a billboard in New York City's Times Square, accusing her of single-handedly bringing down a major deal between Amazon and New York that would have seen the tech giant build a $2.5 billion headquarters in Long Island City, Queens, which borders a slice of Ocasio-Cortez's district. Amazon had been set to create as many as 25,000 jobs, but it would also be potentially receive as much as $3 billion in tax breaks and subsidies.

"Thanks for nothing, AOC!" the giant billboard reads in one of New York City's busiest—and msot iconic—locations, despite the fact that Ocasio-Cortez was not the only politician to speak out in opposition to the deal.

Of course, as much as Ocasio-Cortez has become well-known for her bold policy proposals, such as the Green New Deal, she has also quickly made a name for herself as the "queen of savage comebacks," brushing off the billboard and the "billionaire-funded groups blowing tons of cash on wack billboards."

But the billboard battle is just one in a string of fights the New York politician has faced in an ever-growing war of words with her critics.

common thread in attacks against Ocasio-Cortez appears to center around the lawmaker's intelligence, with critics constantly questioning her intellect, including her role in Amazon's decision to call off its potential deal with New York to build a campus in Queens.

Among those critics was New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, who suggested that Ocasio-Cortez's opposition to the deal stemmed from a lack of understanding of how it would have worked. Meanwhile, conservative outlets also took hits at her, asserting that she "should retake basic math."

Ocasio-Cortez didn't retreat from the backlash, asserting in a tweet that "there was little in the fuzzy proposal that guaranteed jobs for actual NYers, yet lots of hard concessions from the public," as she accused politicians of dismissing valid concerns from the public.

"Queens saw how the FoxConn/Wisconsin disaster is working out–a$4.5 billion nightmare–&asked Qs. The response? 'This is above you. You won't get it.'"

"Folks handling the failed deal treated community w/condescension+disdain for their legitimate concerns," she said. "I warned early to any & all that surging NYC costs+failing subways are creating major political forces to be reckoned with. But I don’t know what I’m talking about, right?"

In a separate tweet, Ocasio-Cortez questioned whether "pundits talking about Amazon" had "even read the deal or where it was going."

Ocasio-Cortez's level of intelligence has come up more times than we can count, but one prominent critic to take aim at the politician was White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway, who, during an appearance on Fox News's America's Newsroom called Ocasio-Cortez a "29-year-old congresswoman who doesn't seem to know much about anything."

Conway's comments came after Ocasio-Cortez accused then-outgoing White House Chief of Staff John Kelly of "cowardice," calling on him to apologize to Representative Frederica Wilson, a Florida Democrat, for calling her an "empty barrel" and incorrectly accusing her of having tried to take credit for the dedication of an FBI building in a 2017 incident.

Ocasio-Cortez hit right back at Conway, sharing an article with the White House counselor's comments and tweeting in response: "Kellyanne Conway has been engaged in a War on Facts since Inauguration Day."

"Leveraging those who belittle my capacity is exactly how I defeated a multi-generation, multi-million $ political machine," she said. "GOP is even weaker bc their bias has no self-control."

In November, former vice presidential candidate and Alaska Governor Sarah Palin attempted to ridicule Ocasio-Cortez for "fumbling Basic Civics" after the New York politician talked about Democrats' chances of winning "all three chambers of government."

"YIKES," Palin wrote on Twitter. "Ocasio-Cortez Fumbles Basic Civics TWICE."

Palin wasn't the only one to note the slip-up, however, with a number of commentators jumping at the chance to point out that Congress has only two chambers, the House and the Senate, while the government has three branches: executive, legislative and judicial.

Ocasio-Cortez responded on Twitter, asserting that "now that's *TWO* fallen GOP Vice Pres candidates going after a freshman Congresswoman that's not even sworn in yet."

"Isn't it a little early to be bringing out the big guns? Especially when they look like the FWD:RE:FWD:WATCH THIS grandpa emails from the '08 election they lost." Yikes, indeed.

Ocasio-Cortez also faced criticism from Republican Minority Whip Steve Scalise who tweeted last month that Democrats wanted to "take away 70 percent of your income and give it to leftist fantasy programs" in response to Ocasio-Cortez's Green New Deal.

Ocasio-Cortez responded by questioning Scalise's understanding of marginal tax rates. "You're the GOP Minority Whip," she said. "How do you not know how marginal tax rates work? Oh, that's right, almost forgot: GOP works for the corporate CEOs showering themselves in multi-million $ bonuses; not the actual working people whose wages + healthcare they're ripping off for profit."

Compared with other lawmakers, the attention and attacks on Ocasio-Cortez's intelligence have been overwhelming, with commentator Dinesh D'Souza, who has been described as a far-right "provocateur" describing the politician as "the stupidest person elected to public office."

Conservative commentators Chicks on the Right also used ad hominem attacks on the freshman representative, asserting in an October post, before the November midterms, that Ocasio-Cortez wasn't "just 'young and naive.' She's stupid. We're talking full-blown dumb-dumb" over Ocasio-Cortez's plans for Congress.

The possibility that the seemingly disproportionate focus on Ocasio-Cortez's level of intelligence could, in some cases, be rooted in sexism, is not one that has been lost on her.

After one industry expert dismissed Ocasio-Cortez's Big Pharma knowledge "inadequate" in response to her line of questioning during a hearing on drug pricing in the U.S., which focused on whether Big Pharma was profiting from foundational research funded by public dollars, Ocasio-Cortez said the experience summed up "what being a woman in politics looks like."

"Disagreements aren’t labeled as differing opinions. They’re labeled as one’s knowledge being ‘inadequate,'" Ocasio-Cortez tweeted out over the incident.

Noting that an expert witness, Dr. Aaron Kesselheim, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, had agreed with her during the hearing that members of the public could be considered as acting like early investors in drug research, which then becomes privatized without them receiving any "return on the investment that they have made," Ocasio-Cortez added: "As a reminder, I’m not the one who testified about Big Pharma under oath to Congress. It was an expert witness."

Last month, Great America PAC Chairman Ed Rollins was accused of sexism after he referred to Ocasio-Cortez as a "little girl" while delivering criticism of her proposed top marginal rate of 70 percent in her Green New Deal on FOX Business Network.

"If you're going to put her up front with her mouth, which she now has attention she's never had before, and you're going to put the little girl who wants to do pre-Reagan economics and 70 percent taxes, the Democratic women are going to be significantly damaged," Rollins said.

“GOP loves to insult my intelligence," Ocasio-Cortez fired back in a tweet. "If anything, this dude is a walking argument to tax misogyny at 100 percent,” she said of Rollins. “Republicans rob everyone the opportunity of real policy debate by resorting to this."

Detractors were accused of sinking particularly low this year when a fake picture of Ocasio-Cortez pretending to depict her as naked in a bathtub spread across conservative outlets.

Calling the attempted smear "disgusting," Ocasio-Cortez said her treatment from the media was indicative of how all women in power are treated.

The New York Democrat also specifically called out The Daily Caller after it ran a story titled: “Here’s the photo some people described as a nude selfie of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.” Retweeting a screenshot of the headline to her millions of followers, Ocasio-Cortez lamented that it was "only a matter of time" before such an image emerged, adding that the "GOP have been losing their minds + frothing at the mouth all week" over the fake photo.

In a YouTube video rant that could be considered both strange and sexist, comedian Roseanne Barr took aim at Ocasio-Cortez, calling the politician a "Farrakhan loving, bug-eyed b****.

While Barr did not name Ocasio-Cortez, she appeared to it make clear whom she was talking about, mentioning Ocasio-Cortez's signature Green New Deal.

"That Green New Deal, that, that Farrakhan loving, bug-eyed b****--h, I don't even remember her name. The bug-eyed b**** that looks like a realtor. She got them realtor eyes," Barr said. "Bug-eyed, lying b****. Farrakhan loving, Israel hater. Leftie."

One of the more out-of-the-box claims apparently intended to humiliate Ocasio-Cortez was a fake meme that spread on social media appearing to suggest that Ocasio-Cortez had previously been fired for incompetence from a "Hot Dog on a Stick" restaurant in 2008. "And then Democrats elected her to Congress," the baseless meme states.

Ocasio-Cortez has also repeatedly been forced to defend herself over her clothing, with Fox News and The Washington Examiner appearing to shame the politician for wearing smart outfits after she said that she would struggle to pay the rent for two residences, one in New York and one in Washington.

“The reason journos from @FoxNews to @dcexaminer can’t help but obsess about my clothes, rent, or mischaracterize respectful convos as ‘fights’ is bc as I’ve said, women like me aren’t supposed to run for office–or win,” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted in November, shortly after her midterm elections victory. “& that’s exactly why the BX and Queens sent me here.”

Ocasio-Cortez's comments came after The Washington Examiner writer Eddie Scarry tweeted a photo of Ocasio-Cortez taken from the back, writing: “Hill staffer sent me this pic of Ocasio-Cortez they took just now. I’ll tell you something: that jacket and coat don’t look like a girl who struggles" and after Fox & Friends mocked her for having "expensive tastes for a socialist" after she wore a more than $3,000 outfit and $600 shoes for an Interview magazine photoshoot in September, with both items being loaned to her by the magazine.

Despite the overwhelming amount of criticism, insults and attempted smears Ocasio-Cortez has faced, a poll last month suggested that if she were to run against President Donald Trump himself, she would likely have a fair shot.

The poll, undertaken by Rasmussen Reports, whose poll leans conservative, found that 43 percent of voters would vote for Trump in a hypothetical election battle, while 40 percent would cast their ballot for Ocasio-Cortez.

The poll's findings may add some fuel to Ocasio-Cortez's claim that the GOP targets her because of how "scared" they are of her, a claim she has made repeatedly


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23 Feb 2019, 10:45 am

shes an easy target because she represents the slightly naive part of liberalism..


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