700,000 Americans Citizens May Lose Food Stamp Benefits

Page 7 of 7 [ 104 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

LoveNotHate
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Oct 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,190
Location: USA

06 Dec 2019, 3:41 pm

Mona Pereth wrote:
LoveNotHate wrote:
Trump isn't cutting anyone.

He's requiring abled-bodied to get part time jobs.

But what if they just CAN'T get jobs, for whatever reason?

Like, they take lots of vacations, and a job would intrude on that?


_________________
After a failure, the easiest thing to do is to blame someone else.


Mona Pereth
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Sep 2018
Age: 61
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,080
Location: New York City (Queens)

06 Dec 2019, 4:06 pm

LoveNotHate wrote:
Mona Pereth wrote:
LoveNotHate wrote:
Trump isn't cutting anyone.

He's requiring abled-bodied to get part time jobs.

But what if they just CAN'T get jobs, for whatever reason?

Like, they take lots of vacations, and a job would intrude on that?

That's not an example of "can't," obviously. Do you mean to deny the existence of "can't"? Here are some examples of "can't":

1) There just aren't any jobs available that they are qualified for near where they live.

2) Prospective employers just don't like them, for whatever reason (possibly due to things beyond the individual's control, e.g. speech impairments, physical ugliness, ASD-related body language oddities).

3) Not having clothes suitable for a job interview, and not being able to afford them.

4) Not being able to drive (either in general or because one's car has broken down and one can't afford to get it fixed), and not living in an area with decent public transportation.

EDIT: I would have no issue with a food stamps work requirement if the government were automatically assigning aid recipients to nearby part-time "public works project" jobs, as under Reagan-style "workfare" (and also providing transportation to said jobs if necessary). I do have a big issue with relying on the private sector to provide the required part-time jobs.


_________________
- Autistic in NYC - Resources and new ideas for the autistic adult community in the New York City metro area.
- My life as one of the many belatedly-diagnosed autistic older people.
- Queens discussion group on Meetup.com.


Last edited by Mona Pereth on 06 Dec 2019, 4:26 pm, edited 3 times in total.

Mona Pereth
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Sep 2018
Age: 61
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,080
Location: New York City (Queens)

06 Dec 2019, 4:11 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
We should provide incentives for people to train on the new technology.

Or, at least, make it easier for people (including and especially working poor people) to get an education and acquire new job skills.

The current financial aid system is screwed up, insofar as only people who are attending college fulltime can get Pell grants. As far as I am aware, there is little or no financial aid other than student loans for people attending part-time, which is a great hardship for poor people with full-time jobs.

There should be grants for people attending school part-time who are also working full-time jobs and have income below some threshold.

Under the current system, there are a lot of people who are both working full time AND attending school fulltime, because that's the only way they can get a Pell grant and thus afford to go to college. Only problem is, they end up failing a lot of their classes because they just don't have enough time to study. And it's kinda pointless to go to college only to end up failing because you don't have enough time to study.


_________________
- Autistic in NYC - Resources and new ideas for the autistic adult community in the New York City metro area.
- My life as one of the many belatedly-diagnosed autistic older people.
- Queens discussion group on Meetup.com.


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 66,432
Location: Queens, NYC

06 Dec 2019, 5:17 pm

If this is like "workfare" in NYC, people would be assigned to the "public works" sort of projects mentioned by Mona.



Mona Pereth
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Sep 2018
Age: 61
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,080
Location: New York City (Queens)

06 Dec 2019, 5:36 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
If this is like "workfare" in NYC, people would be assigned to the "public works" sort of projects mentioned by Mona.

Unfortunately, it's NOT "workfare." As the article linked at the beginning of this thread points out:

Quote:
Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., the ranking member of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry, said this rule would do little to help anyone find work. All the rule change does is strip people from accessing the benefit, she said.

"This Administration is out of touch with families who are struggling to make ends meet by working seasonal jobs or part time jobs with unreliable hours," Stabenow said. "Seasonal holiday workers, workers in Northern Michigan’s tourism industry, and workers with unreliable hours like waiters and waitresses are the kinds of workers hurt by this proposal."

The senator also noted that an attempt to add work requirements to SNAP had failed in Congress when they had considered the Farm Bill last year. The House rejected it in a bipartisan vote of 330-83, and the Senate voted down a similar amendment 68-30.

"There’s a reason Republicans and Democrats overwhelmingly rejected this callous proposal in the Farm Bill and instead focused on bipartisan job training opportunities that actually help families find good paying jobs,” she said.

Hunger advocates have repeatedly emphasized that SNAP is intended to address hunger and not compel people to work. Many also noted that those affected are impoverished, tend to live in rural areas, often face mental health issues and disabilities.


_________________
- Autistic in NYC - Resources and new ideas for the autistic adult community in the New York City metro area.
- My life as one of the many belatedly-diagnosed autistic older people.
- Queens discussion group on Meetup.com.


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 66,432
Location: Queens, NYC

06 Dec 2019, 5:39 pm

Then it's ridiculous, in my opinion, to take away these peoples' food stamps.

It's not a slam dunk that these people will get jobs. This online job search process is an arduous one.

I had a hard time getting my second job. It took me months.

I wish this was "workfare."



Mona Pereth
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Sep 2018
Age: 61
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,080
Location: New York City (Queens)

06 Dec 2019, 5:49 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Then it's ridiculous, in my opinion, to take away these peoples' food stamps.

It's not a slam dunk that these people will get jobs. This online job search process is an arduous one.

I had a hard time getting my second job. It took me months.

I wish this was "workfare."

"Workfare," alas, was ended under Bill Clinton, in favor of the current system of requiring people to get jobs in the private sector.


_________________
- Autistic in NYC - Resources and new ideas for the autistic adult community in the New York City metro area.
- My life as one of the many belatedly-diagnosed autistic older people.
- Queens discussion group on Meetup.com.


LoveNotHate
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Oct 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,190
Location: USA

06 Dec 2019, 6:10 pm

Mona Pereth wrote:
LoveNotHate wrote:
Mona Pereth wrote:
LoveNotHate wrote:
Trump isn't cutting anyone.

He's requiring abled-bodied to get part time jobs.

But what if they just CAN'T get jobs, for whatever reason?

Like, they take lots of vacations, and a job would intrude on that?

That's not an example of "can't," obviously. Do you mean to deny the existence of "can't"? Here are some examples of "can't":

1) There just aren't any jobs available that they are qualified for near where they live.

2) Prospective employers just don't like them, for whatever reason (possibly due to things beyond the individual's control, e.g. speech impairments, physical ugliness, ASD-related body language oddities).

3) Not having clothes suitable for a job interview, and not being able to afford them.

4) Not being able to drive (either in general or because one's car has broken down and one can't afford to get it fixed), and not living in an area with decent public transportation.

EDIT: I would have no issue with a food stamps work requirement if the government were automatically assigning aid recipients to nearby part-time "public works project" jobs, as under Reagan-style "workfare" (and also providing transportation to said jobs if necessary). I do have a big issue with relying on the private sector to provide the required part-time jobs.

For able-bodied people, "Can't" is an excuse.

#1 <--- Move
#2 <----This is about able-bodied.
#3 <----Clothes are cheap. Go to a charity or church.
#4<-----Move

Likely, most of these 2.1 million are retirees living in expensive homes, with nice cars. Yet, only have SS income, so their MAGI (Modified Adjusted Income) is low enough to qualify. Maybe they have a lot of money in the bank too.

However, put a part time work requirement on these people, and watch them drop off, they're too rich to go back to work.


_________________
After a failure, the easiest thing to do is to blame someone else.


Persephone29
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 14 Jun 2019
Age: 52
Gender: Female
Posts: 1,617
Location: Everville

06 Dec 2019, 7:33 pm

I worked for the state for 12 years, it's what I hope to get back into. I worked with a woman who was legally blind. When her mother was pregnant with her, she contracted toxoplasmosis. This woman went to nursing school, passed. Got a job with the state as a nurse case manager, her computer screen looked like a drive-in movie theater. She took public transport every day... She refused to be on public assistance. Surely, if she can do it, I can.

I'm sorry. I will always believe that where there's a will, there's a way. I just think that often there's too little will.

I want to work. I hope I can again. I would hate to be stuck in a cycle of dependence forever, I don't know how people do it unless they simply have no choice. It's awful just being dependent on my husband for everything.


_________________
Disagreeing with you doesn't mean I hate you, it just means we disagree.


kraftiekortie
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 Feb 2014
Gender: Male
Posts: 66,432
Location: Queens, NYC

06 Dec 2019, 7:44 pm

In the vast majority of cases, I believe it is better for a person to get a job than it is for a person to get benefits.



Mona Pereth
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Sep 2018
Age: 61
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,080
Location: New York City (Queens)

06 Dec 2019, 11:56 pm

LoveNotHate wrote:
Mona Pereth wrote:
Do you mean to deny the existence of "can't"? Here are some examples of "can't":

1) There just aren't any jobs available that they are qualified for near where they live.

2) Prospective employers just don't like them, for whatever reason (possibly due to things beyond the individual's control, e.g. speech impairments, physical ugliness, ASD-related body language oddities).

3) Not having clothes suitable for a job interview, and not being able to afford them.

4) Not being able to drive (either in general or because one's car has broken down and one can't afford to get it fixed), and not living in an area with decent public transportation.

EDIT: I would have no issue with a food stamps work requirement if the government were automatically assigning aid recipients to nearby part-time "public works project" jobs, as under Reagan-style "workfare" (and also providing transportation to said jobs if necessary). I do have a big issue with relying on the private sector to provide the required part-time jobs.

For able-bodied people, "Can't" is an excuse.

#1 <--- Move
#2 <----This is about able-bodied.
#3 <----Clothes are cheap. Go to a charity or church.
#4<-----Move

Moving costs money, which truly poor people don't have.

There are also plenty of "able-bodied" people who have disabilities that aren't considered serious enough to warrant SSI, but that do result in most employers refusing to hire them.

There also exist plenty of people who at least theoretically do qualify for SSI but who (because of their disability) don't have the wherewithal to go through the byzantine process of applying for SSI. Some of these people try their darndest to get jobs that they are unable to keep.

Finding nice interview clothes at a "charity or church" is far from guaranteed, especially if one's body is of an unusual size or shape.

LoveNotHate wrote:
Likely, most of these 2.1 million are retirees living in expensive homes, with nice cars. Yet, only have SS income, so their MAGI (Modified Adjusted Income) is low enough to qualify. Maybe they have a lot of money in the bank too.

However, put a part time work requirement on these people, and watch them drop off, they're too rich to go back to work.

What are your grounds for saying that "most" of these 2.1 million are retirees living in expensive homes ...? What you've said is probably true for some non-working people on food stamps, but "most"?

Anyhow, what are your thoughts about Reagan-era "workfare" vs. the present system of requiring aid recipients to find jobs in the private sector?

(See my posts here and here, and see kraftkortie's post quoted in the last of these posts.)


_________________
- Autistic in NYC - Resources and new ideas for the autistic adult community in the New York City metro area.
- My life as one of the many belatedly-diagnosed autistic older people.
- Queens discussion group on Meetup.com.


Last edited by Mona Pereth on 07 Dec 2019, 12:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

Mona Pereth
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 11 Sep 2018
Age: 61
Gender: Female
Posts: 2,080
Location: New York City (Queens)

07 Dec 2019, 12:06 am

Persephone29 wrote:
I worked for the state for 12 years, it's what I hope to get back into. I worked with a woman who was legally blind. When her mother was pregnant with her, she contracted toxoplasmosis. This woman went to nursing school, passed. Got a job with the state as a nurse case manager, her computer screen looked like a drive-in movie theater. She took public transport every day...

Fortunately she lived in a place where there was public transport.

Persephone29 wrote:
She refused to be on public assistance. Surely, if she can do it, I can.

I'm sorry. I will always believe that where there's a will, there's a way. I just think that often there's too little will.

I want to work. I hope I can again. I would hate to be stuck in a cycle of dependence forever, I don't know how people do it unless they simply have no choice. It's awful just being dependent on my husband for everything.

Good luck getting another job. And of course it's much better to have a job than to be stuck in a cycle of dependence.

However, whether or not you succeed in getting another job, I would suggest that you be slower to judge other people in circumstances you might not fully understand.


_________________
- Autistic in NYC - Resources and new ideas for the autistic adult community in the New York City metro area.
- My life as one of the many belatedly-diagnosed autistic older people.
- Queens discussion group on Meetup.com.


Rainbow_Belle
Toucan
Toucan

Joined: 16 Jan 2019
Gender: Female
Posts: 286
Location: Sydney

07 Dec 2019, 1:43 am

Give more motivation to unemployed American workers to work. 15 to 20 hours per week for workfare in return for Food Stamp Benefits to learn that you must earn and give back to society instead of mooching off the hard working tax payers of America.

America needs a nation of lifters that work hard and contribute towards society and pay taxes. America does not want to encourage moochers and leaners that leech off the hard work of others and give nothing back to society. Is America a nation of lifters or leaners?



LoveNotHate
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Oct 2013
Gender: Female
Posts: 6,190
Location: USA

07 Dec 2019, 4:28 am

Persephone29 wrote:
I worked for the state for 12 years, it's what I hope to get back into. I worked with a woman who was legally blind. When her mother was pregnant with her, she contracted toxoplasmosis. This woman went to nursing school, passed. Got a job with the state as a nurse case manager, her computer screen looked like a drive-in movie theater. She took public transport every day... She refused to be on public assistance. Surely, if she can do it, I can.

I'm sorry. I will always believe that where there's a will, there's a way. I just think that often there's too little will.

I want to work. I hope I can again. I would hate to be stuck in a cycle of dependence forever, I don't know how people do it unless they simply have no choice. It's awful just being dependent on my husband for everything.

This is inspirational!


_________________
After a failure, the easiest thing to do is to blame someone else.