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magz
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23 Jul 2020, 3:22 am

blooiejagwa wrote:
Andoras wrote:
Well, well, well, the time finally came:
https://www.huffpost.com/entry/trump-ad ... 8e681df77e

also Bolsonaro's third coronavirus test became positive too:
https://edition.cnn.com/world/live-news ... d86d2806bb


you know what's creepy is on another forum some members shared how they or their friends tested negative initially and it was an error and they actually had it/... i mean they thought they were free to carry on and they unwittingly must have spread it more than if they had known..

That's why face masks, hand washing, social distancing and all apply to everyonee, not just people who tested positive.


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24 Jul 2020, 4:23 pm

Either the lockdown has been working in Canada resulting in this number(1% infected covid19 )
or it wasnt worth this degree of drastic action to begin with.. 8O
https://youtu.be/ppQu24WRGSA


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24 Jul 2020, 4:51 pm

My wife has been watching too many home improvement shows. She decided we need to remodel the kitchen. So we had some Amish/Mennonite workers over to measure the new countertops today. They related the following story.

There was a flood about 3 months ago and an Amish family in a buggy decided to pass through the water. It carried the buggy away and the family of 7 all drowned. When the extended family received the death certificates, they were all listed as having died of the COVID coronavirus. They were really upset because none of the family had COVID. They died because they drowned.

How did this come about. Well I suspect it all had to do with money. Hospitals use medical coding to identify the cause of illness/death in patients. There is a financial incentive to medically code the deaths as COVID rather than simply as drowning deaths.

If an obvious abuse of the medical coding system is allowed to be entered unchallenged, then it point to the fact that many of the coronavirus deaths in the U.S. are erroneous. And when the CDC tabulates these deaths, the trend lines are inaccurate and this in part is due to the financial incentive placed in medically coding deaths as COVID.


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25 Jul 2020, 9:53 am

A Doctor Who Specializes in Long-Term COVID-19 Effects Is Alarmed by What He Sees

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For thousands of Americans, a coronavirus diagnosis was only the beginning. For months now, people who recovered from the initial illness have been experiencing a wide range of persistent symptoms: shortness of breath, weakness, brain fog, fatigue, depression. Countries hit hard by the pandemic in Europe have begun offering rehabilitation services to COVID-19 survivors, but the medical science community still knows very little about how the body recovers from the virus’ attacks on the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, heart, kidneys, liver, brain, and nervous system.

“This illness is more than just the initial infection, and to get a handle on it, we needed to learn about it,” says Dr. Zijian Chen, medical director of Mount Sinai’s Center for Post-COVID Care, one of the first places dedicated to treating people reporting long-term coronavirus effects. Since opening in May, the center has seen 300 patients who were either COVID-19-positive or presumed positive, and have continued to experience distress. Intelligencer spoke with Dr. Chen about the wide range of symptoms he’s seeing, the psychological toll of COVID-19’s aftereffects, and his fear that some patients may never recover.

It’s been a little over two months since you opened this post COVID-19 care center. What have you learned?
That recovery is going to be a very long process for many people. We’ve been seeing patients for two months. And we’re at the beginning stages of learning exactly what types of symptoms COVID patients will have long-term. The more patients we see, the more types of symptoms we’re finding out about. Over time, I think we’re going to find ways to treat all of these symptoms, but that’s going to be a very long process.

One study out of Italy reported nearly 90 percent of patients recovering from coronavirus were feeling symptoms two months after the virus was detectable. What sorts of numbers are you seeing?
It’s very, very close to that. Everybody we see has symptoms. Because of that, I can’t tell you what percentage of people infected will have symptoms and what percentage will not, but these are not just patients who had been hospitalized. These are patients who got sick and were home but continue to have symptoms that are unrelenting. I feel like the population of this is going to be very large.

What percentage of the patients you are seeing were hospitalized?
Not that high. Maybe 20 or 30 percent.

What’s the range of symptoms?
The most prominent of these symptoms is definitely shortness of breath. I would say 60 to 70 percent of our patients are short of breath in one way or the other. Then there is chest pain and chest discomfort, and then neurological symptoms, like fatigue, weakness, poor concentration, poor memory.

What’s the most surprising symptom you’ve seen?
The most surprising thing I’ve seen is how much psychiatric illness there is — anxiety and depression. There’s a very high percentage of that.

Is that anxiety from the experience of having COVID or from the frustration of not knowing how long the symptoms are going to last?
I think it’s a combination of the two. Both of those are very traumatic events. Not only are patients ailing with that initial illness, they now have something that’s really persistent, and has been for months. They don’t know what to do because, unfortunately, some doctors don’t believe that they really have these symptoms and the doctors who do don’t have resources to get help. All of this combined is very stressful.

Are you diagnosing patients with PTSD?
I would say anywhere from 25 to 35 percent of the patients we see are suffering from anxiety, depression, PTSD, or something similar.

Is there a link between the psychological toll and the physical ailments?
Not directly. We haven’t started compiling the data yet, but I would imagine the more residual post-COVID symptoms you have, the more likely you are to have some psychiatric effects.

For patients who have, say, shortness of breath, have you witnessed any improvement after they come to you?
Some have improvement and others are still at baseline, meaning they haven’t improved. What we do is pull together a team of cardiologists, pulmonologists, and rehab doctors. They give the patient medications to help them breathe better, whether it be medicine that opens your airways or decreases inflammation. If that doesn’t work, we help patients condition themselves so that their bodies are better prepared to exercise. That helps with overall muscle function and breathing. We’re seeing whether this cooperative approach between different specialties can help, rather than just having one specialist see the patient.

In terms of the lasting symptoms you’re witnessing, what can you compare this disease to?
That’s an interesting question. COVID is unique in that there are so many different body symptoms. I can’t really think of another illness that’s as traumatic. You have some autoimmune diseases that may be similar, but one thing that stands out is post-ICU syndrome. There are patients who suffer acute illness — they’re in the ICU for a very long time. From there, they’re discharged after they get better, and have residual symptoms for a long time because of the de-conditioning or possible super infections that happen in the ICU and also the effect of, say, sepsis or whatever illness that put them there. But we’re seeing this in patients who weren’t hospitalized.

What are you most concerned about?
I’m most concerned about how very little we know about the symptoms and the expectancy of how long they will last. If you look at the total cases, even if a small percentage have these post-COVID problems, we’re going to be in a lot of trouble. That would be an immense number of patients. Our health system cannot take care of that many people.

Have you been able to nail down an average recovery time for any of these symptoms?
No. I wish we could. That’s the uncertainty. We’re still on the upswing of this curve. The more people who get sick and recover from the initial illness, the more people will start to develop these secondary symptoms. We don’t even know when we’re going to hit that peak of chronic patients. Looking at the data, some of the damage may be permanent. Permanent lung fibrosis and similar damage to other organ systems.

I think a lot of the pulmonary symptoms are going to be very long-lasting. That’s the best data we have right now. We know that there’s a lot of pulmonary damage beyond just the viral infection. We know there’s a lot of immune system damage that happens during the infection that damages tissue in the lungs so badly that it’s no longer functioning. That’s why the patients have shortness of breath, because part of their lung tissue just isn’t working. It’s very similar to very acute bacterial infections that also destroy lung tissue, and patients don’t fully recover after that. I can imagine many patients will have shortness of breath for months or years, if not the rest of their lives.


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25 Jul 2020, 12:00 pm

Although COVID19 can affect the lungs and produce pneumonia, there is a second pathway that I think might also come into play.

I suspect that the virus inflames the heart. It throws the heart out of rhythm. Generally a person can't really detect this happening. Their pulse rate drops into the 30 bpm producing bradycardia. As a result their oxygen saturation rates begin to drop. This causes pooling in their blood which leads to the formation of blood clots.

Now this is really dangerous. Blood clots can develop into a pulmonary embolism. This can produce symptoms of sudden shortness of breath and chest pains with breathing. So even though the individual might be showing symptoms of pneumonia, the cause of their death might actually be the blood clot that enters their lung.

The blood clots can also get into the pathways to the brain and produce strokes. They can also clog the arteries to the heart and produce heart attacks.


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25 Jul 2020, 2:08 pm

STERILIZATION OF N95 FACEMASK

Inventor of N95 mask came out of retirement to fight coronavirus

The inventor of the coveted N95 respirator had barely entered retirement before a global health crisis called him back to work.

With professional-grade face masks in short supply, materials scientist Peter Tsai felt obligated to return to his study — on a mission to yield the most effective methods of preserving and sterilizing the life-saving personal protective equipment he helped invent 25 years ago.

“If I could help, and I did not help, I would regret it for the rest of my life because people are dying,” Tsai, who patented the N95 respirator in 1995, told Yahoo Life.

Tsai, 68, from Taiwan, has lived in Tennessee for the larger part of his career, as a professor and researcher at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.

The wearable filtration methods he developed in the early 90s were meant “for construction workers to protect them when they work in dusty environments,” he explained.

Now, the technology has become one of the most critical tools in the fight against the coronavirus — and Tsai wants everyone to know that.

Image

“Scientific data shows that if an infected person wears a mask then 95 percent of the virus is contained inside the mask. If an infected person does not wear a mask, a healthy person with a mask is only 30 percent to 40 percent protected,” he said. “Everyone needs to wear a mask.”

As the threat of the pandemic grew dire, Tsai was working “almost 20 hours a day” in his own home to find safe sterilization methods, such as boiling and baking, he told the Washington Post. His findings were recently published in the Journal of Emergency Medicine, and touted by the National Institutes of Health.

He discovered that a “dry heat method” was the most effective and durable solution to mask sterilization. N95s can be heated at 158 degrees for 60 minutes using a convection oven, essentially, and it will retain a filtering efficiency (FE) of 98.5 percent.

Another easy at-home method he found was a five-minute boil, then air-drying the mask (heat dry can warp the fit) yielded 92.4 percent FE.

Tsai was called to action, just 24 months out of retirement, by a group called N95DECON, made up of concerned scientists, engineers and health care workers who sought guidance on mask conservation. Aside from his work on effective mask reuse, he’s collaborated with the Oak Ridge National Lab, sponsored by the Energy Department, to develop a plan to scale-up their production of N95 masks. By converting their existing processing facility into one that can produce filtration cloth, the Tennessee lab can now put out 9,000 masks per hour.

They intend to share their work so other labs can apply the technology. Recently, a fuel-filtration manufacturer — Cummins, of Columbus, Ind., — consulted with Oak Ridge to join the PPE production efforts. Now, they’re able to produce 1 million masks per day.

“If I can have this opportunity to help the community, then it will be a good memory for the rest of my life,” Tsai said. “I’m happy to do it.”


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25 Jul 2020, 8:05 pm

National Medical Experts Calling for US to Shut Down, Start Over

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As coronavirus cases continue to rise in Florida and across the country, medical experts are calling for another shutdown in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19.

More than 150 of the country's top scientists, nurses, and doctors sent a letter to political leaders urging the U.S. to shut down and start over.

The letter criticized officials for reopening too soon and not doing enough during the shutdown to prepare.

They are especially worried about the states of Florida, Texas, and California, which all reported record numbers of cases and deaths over this past week.

"It's not a question of doing it a second or a third time. It's that we're going to be some measure of this for years if we don't do it right," Dr. Seth Trueger, with Northwestern University Emergency Medicine, expressed.

In the letter, medical experts also called for expanded testing and more PPE.

"Right now, we are on a path to lose more than 200,000 American lives by November 1," the letter stated. "Yet, in many states people can drink in bars, get a haircut, eat inside a restaurant, get a tattoo, get a massage, and do myriad other normal, pleasant, but non-essential activities."

Their recommendations come as the United States crossed the 4 million mark on Thursday, with at least 4,028,741 cases of coronavirus and 144,072 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University's count.

According to statisticians from the CDC, COVID-19 "will end up as a Top 10 leading cause of death" this year. However, the CDC cannot start ranking leading causes of deaths until the end of the year, in order to get a full year's worth of data.

As of now, there are no plans in Florida for another shutdown.


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25 Jul 2020, 8:19 pm

ASPartOfMe wrote:
National Medical Experts Calling for U.S. to Shut Down, Start Over


There are medical experts on both sides of this issue. At the present the decision in the U.S is in the hands of each individual State and their governor. Many areas of each State were affected differently by geological location. Many rural areas were much less affected than highly dense cities. Many States have chosen a county by county approach for determining which areas should be under quarantine.


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27 Jul 2020, 6:46 am

Massachusetts biotech company Moderna launched Phase 3 of its coronavirus vaccine trial on Monday. Moderna anticipates enrolling 30,000 U.S. participants.

The needed proof: Volunteers won’t know if they’re getting the real shot or a dummy version. After two doses, scientists will closely track which group experiences more infections as they go about their daily routines, especially in areas where the virus still is spreading unchecked.

Moderna is working with the NIH and BARDA to develop its vaccine as part of Operation Warp Speed, the Trump administration's effort to pinpoint and accelerate the most effective coronavirus vaccines.

Source: Moderna launches coronavirus vaccine Phase 3 trial


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27 Jul 2020, 9:29 am

Marlins-Orioles game canceled due to COVID-19 outbreak resulting in at least 14 cases, per reports

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Major League Baseball's season is less than a week old, but one team has already experienced a COVID-19 outbreak that will sideline a chunk of its roster and has caused a game to be canceled.

The Miami Marlins, who had four players test positive during their opening series against the Philadelphia Phillies, had an additional eight players and two coaches test positive on Monday, less than 12 hours before they were supposed to play their home opener against the Baltimore Orioles, according to ESPN's Jeff Passan.

That means the Marlins have had at least 14 individuals become infected over the last several days. In response to the outbreak, the Marlins game against the Orioles on Monday night will not be played, according to The Athletic's Ken Rosenthal.

Here are five things to know about this story.

Who has been affected?
Four individuals consented to allow the Marlins to disclose their positive test ahead of Monday's news: Catcher Jorge Alfaro, outfielders Garrett Cooper and Harold Ramirez, and pitcher Jose Urena, who was scratched prior to his Sunday start.

Where are the Marlins, Orioles?
The Marlins have not left Philadelphia. They were scheduled to depart on Sunday evening, after the game, but changed their plans to leave on Monday. That flight did not take off, however.

The Orioles, meanwhile, do appear to be in Miami. Outfielder Dwight Smith Jr. tweeted that the plane was departing on Sunday night. That tracks with the normal operating procedures that see teams arrive the night prior rather than the morning of games.

[bB]What about the Phillies game on Monday?[/b]
The Phillies remain scheduled to host the New York Yankees on Monday evening. It's unclear if that will change prior to the first pitch.

Are the Phillies at risk of a similar outbreak?
Because the Marlins almost certainly had individuals who tested positive playing in games over the weekend, it's fair to wonder if the Phillies might be at risk of a similar outbreak.

Based on what is known about COVID-19, the highest risk for infection is spending prolonged time in closed or poorly ventilated areas with large crowds and in an intimate fashion. In other words, playing a baseball game outside with (mostly) fleeting contact does not seem like a situation that should engender transmission from one individual to another -- at least not on another team.

The Athletic talked to a pair of infectious-disease experts who agreed that the likelihood of transmission from the Marlins to the Phillies was "low." Of course, "low" doesn't mean zero, and Phillies players (and Yankees players, if they are asked to dress in the same clubhouse as the Marlins did) are right to be nervous about the situation at hand.

Will the season be canceled?
This is an unknowable question at this point, in part because there are no clear guidelines on what would trigger the season to be scrapped. Again, as The Athletic noted, the decision is in the hands of commissioner Rob Manfred, and him alone.

Ostensibly, if the season remains in place, then more players could opt-out rather than expose themselves and their loved ones to the potential for a similar outbreak in their clubhouse.


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27 Jul 2020, 2:25 pm

Coronavirus outbreak show signs of slowing in Arizona, Texas and Florida

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Coronavirus outbreaks in Arizona, Florida and Texas appear to be slowing down as more people practice social distancing and states halt reopening plans.

On Sunday, Arizona reported a 13% drop in the seven-day average of new Covid-19 cases, logging 2,627 newly diagnosed cases over the previous 24 hours, down from 3,022 the previous week, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Coronavirus outbreaks in Arizona, Florida and Texas appear to be slowing down as more people practice social distancing and states halt reopening plans.

On Sunday, Arizona reported a 13% drop in the seven-day average of new Covid-19 cases, logging 2,627 newly diagnosed cases over the previous 24 hours, down from 3,022 the previous week, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

Cases in Texas have fallen almost 19% over the previous week, topping roughly 8,404 new daily cases based on a seven-day moving average on Sunday, according to the CNBC analysis. Since its peak in average new daily cases on July 20 of 10,572, the number has slightly fallen. CNBC uses a seven-day average to calculate Covid-19 trends because it smooths out inconsistencies and gaps in state data.

Although Texas is showing signs that its new infections are starting to slow, it hit a record-high in average hospitalizations of 10,840 Covid-19 patients on Sunday. The same day, the state also broke a grim record of average daily new deaths of 152.

Florida has just begun seeing its curve start to flatten since reaching a record-high average of daily new cases of 11,870 on July 17, according to data from Johns Hopkins. On Sunday, the state had 10,544 average new cases, which is a 8% decrease compared with a week ago.

However, the state is still reporting growth in hospitalizations and fatalities as the virus continues to hit densely populated cities in southern Florida.

U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar said Monday that officials are starting to see a leveling-off of cases in hard-hit states due to people “stepping up to the plate.”

“It’s due to the fact that people are actually wearing masks. They’re wearing their masks. They’re social distancing. They’re engaging in good personal hygiene,” Azar said on “Fox and Friends.”

Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner, also said Monday that hot spot states in the Sunbelt region of the U.S. are starting to plateau in the number of new Covid-19 cases.

“On the whole, it looks like Arizona, Texas and probably Florida at the very least are starting to hit a plateau,” he said on “Squawk Box.” “Arizona looks like they’re starting to come down the epidemic curve slowly. I think these are going to be extended plateaus. I think we’re going to hang out at the level of infection that we’re at right now.”

However, Gottlieb cautioned that “even as these states come down, other states look like they are heating up and so they’ll start to offset the gains we are making in the Sunbelt.”

For the first time since June 12, the rate of growth in average daily new Covid-19 cases fell across the U.S. on Sunday compared with a week ago. Nationally, there were an average of 65,809 daily cases new cases on Sunday, a 1.6% decrease from the previous week, based on a seven-day moving average.

While the number of new coronavirus cases across the U.S. has been on the decline for the past few days, it does not paint an accurate picture of the rate of infection. Weekend reporting from states tend to be delayed as some counties only release their numbers on weekdays.

Gottlieb also said that some states have not been reporting their numbers reliably since the Department of Health and Human Services instructed all hospitals to stop reporting their data to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s long-standing National Healthcare Safety Network. Instead, hospitals now have to report to HHS through a new portal that went live a week ago.


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27 Jul 2020, 6:48 pm

huge applause not only for the health care workers, essential workers, and so on

but also the army.

they helped out in long term care homes -
and in some cases reported mismanagement/neglect/abuse they witnessed during their time their, of the people in their care. which will lead to investigations and improvements.

i don't see anyone make that big of a deal out of it, but it is just as noble - not only being in the army,--then helping out WITHIN your country with the care of the vulnerable! and speaking up for them, where necessary, to get positive changes made!

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavir ... -1.4992617


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27 Jul 2020, 6:50 pm

jimmy m wrote:
My wife has been watching too many home improvement shows. She decided we need to remodel the kitchen. So we had some Amish/Mennonite workers over to measure the new countertops today. They related the following story.

There was a flood about 3 months ago and an Amish family in a buggy decided to pass through the water. It carried the buggy away and the family of 7 all drowned. When the extended family received the death certificates, they were all listed as having died of the COVID coronavirus. They were really upset because none of the family had COVID. They died because they drowned.

How did this come about. Well I suspect it all had to do with money. Hospitals use medical coding to identify the cause of illness/death in patients. There is a financial incentive to medically code the deaths as COVID rather than simply as drowning deaths.

If an obvious abuse of the medical coding system is allowed to be entered unchallenged, then it point to the fact that many of the coronavirus deaths in the U.S. are erroneous. And when the CDC tabulates these deaths, the trend lines are inaccurate and this in part is due to the financial incentive placed in medically coding deaths as COVID.


this has been reported to us from other countries, like a doctor working in italy that my family's acquaintances know (they forwarded his account). i will see if i can find it to copy-paste here.
it's quite a conspiracy it seems, at times.


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28 Jul 2020, 4:01 pm

CORONAVIRUS TRANSMISSION: POOR INDOOR VENTILATION

Converging lines of evidence indicate that SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, can pass from person to person in tiny droplets called aerosols that waft through the air and accumulate over time. After months of debate about whether people can transmit the virus through exhaled air, there is growing concern among scientists about this transmission route.

On 6 July, Morawska and aerosol scientist Donald Milton at the University of Maryland, College Park, supported by an international group of 237 other clinicians, infectious-disease physicians, epidemiologists, engineers and aerosol scientists, published a commentary in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases that urges the medical community and public-health authorities to acknowledge the potential for airborne transmission. They also call for preventive measures to reduce this type of risk.

Many researchers concerned about airborne transmission point to the example of a fateful choir rehearsal that took place an hour’s drive from Seattle, Washington, on 10 March. Sixty-one members of the Skagit Valley Chorale gathered for a practice that lasted two and a half hours. Despite there being hand sanitizer at the door, and choir members refraining from hugs and handshakes, at least 33 choristers contracted SARS-CoV-2, and 2 eventually died. Investigators concluded that the virus could have spread in aerosols produced by singing, and a ‘super-emitter’ who produced more aerosol particles than is typical, although they couldn’t rule out transmission through objects or large droplets.

But Morawska has modelled the conditions in the rehearsal hall, and says there is no need to invoke the idea of a superspreader4. Inadequate ventilation, the long exposure time and the singing were sufficient to explain the number of people who became infected. And no amount of ventilation could have reduced the risk to an acceptable level for the two-and-a-half-hour rehearsal, she says.

In another case, researchers used a tracer gas to show that aerosols carried on currents from an air-conditioning unit in a restaurant in Guangzhou, China, were to blame for an outbreak affecting ten diners from three separate families. None of the staff or patrons seated near other air-conditioning units were infected.

Meanwhile, a tour-bus passenger in Hunan province in China infected 8 of the 49 people on the bus. One of those sat 4.5 metres away from the infected person and entered and exited the bus through a different door. “That excludes the possibility of contacting each other or [being] in very close contact,” says Yang Yang, an epidemiologist at the University of Florida in Gainsville who is co-authoring a report on the case. “I think there is enough evidence for us to be very concerned in indoor environments, especially in confined spaces,” he says.

Case studies can provide circumstantial evidence that aerosols are carrying the virus, but researchers want to nail down how and when that happens. The problem is catching aerosols in the act.

Laboratory studies going back to the 1930s and 1940s concluded that droplets expelled through talking or coughing are larger than aerosols. These bigger droplets, more than 5 micrometres in diameter, drop out of the air quickly because they are too heavy to ride on light air currents.

But more-sensitive experiments are now painting a more complex picture that points to the importance of aerosols as a transmission route. A study published in May used laser-light scattering to detect droplets emitted by healthy volunteers when speaking. The authors calculated that for SARS-CoV-2, one minute of loud speaking generates upwards of 1,000 small, virus-laden aerosols 4 micrometres in diameter that remain airborne for at least 8 minutes. They conclude that “there is a substantial probability that normal speaking causes airborne virus transmission in confined environments”.

Another study published by Morawska and her colleagues as a preprint, which has not yet been peer reviewed, found that people infected with SARS-CoV-2 exhaled 1,000–100,000 copies per minute of viral RNA, a marker of the pathogen’s presence. Because the volunteers simply breathed out, the viral RNA was probably carried in aerosols rather than in the large droplets produced during coughing, sneezing or speaking.

Other laboratory studies suggest that aerosols of SARS-CoV-2 remain infectious for longer than do aerosols of some related respiratory viruses. When researchers created aerosols of the new coronavirus, the aerosols remained infectious for at least 16 hours, and had greater infectivity than did those of the coronaviruses SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, which cause severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome, respectively.

Source: Mounting evidence suggests coronavirus is airborne — but health advice has not caught up

If you do not define the threat properly, do not expect to be able to control the spread of this virus. Otherwise it is just like pissing in the wind.


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jimmy m
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28 Jul 2020, 4:49 pm

IS A NATIONAL QUARANTINE AN EFFECTIVE STRATEGY

Sweden continues a downward trend of COVID-19 cases after a much-debated approach kept large parts of society open during the coronavirus pandemic. “The curves go down, and the curves over the seriously ill begin to be very close to zero. As a whole, it is very positive," Sweden’s chief epidemiologist Anders Tegnell said. While coronavirus cases increase in Europe, Sweden, which had called for its people to take personal responsibility instead of ordering government-mandated lockdowns, on Tuesday reported just two new deaths, bringing the confirmed toll to 5,702. “With numbers diminishing very quickly in Sweden, we see no point in wearing a face mask in Sweden, not even on public transport,” Tegnell said.

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Swedish officials declined to implement strict lockdown measures widely adopted in Europe. Large gatherings were banned, but restaurants and schools for young children have stayed open. The Swedish government has urged social distancing, and citizens have largely complied.

"We've actually seen a clearly declining trend in the number of patients in intensive care and also in the number of deaths since the middle of April," said Anna Mia Ekström, clinical professor of global infectious disease epidemiology at Stockholm’s Karolinksa Institute.

There have been nearly 80,000 cases in the country of 10 million people.

"Now we see one or two deaths a day and very few persons admitted to ICU (intensive care units)," added Jan Albert, a professor of infectious disease control at the Karolinska Institute.

Source: Sweden sees coronavirus cases drop, after controversially avoiding lockdowns


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A very unique plan. As Dr. Paul Thompson wrote, "This is the very best paper on the virus I have ever seen."


blooiejagwa
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28 Jul 2020, 5:30 pm

as i've deleted and downloaded again my whatsapp app so many times (deleted to make room for videos/photos, then added again once they were uploaded to google drive).. i dont have the message i mentioned 2 posts above me..
sorry to say. i don't do the whatsapp stored to google drive thing because it allows whatsapp to access your info more than it already does.


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