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blooiejagwa
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06 Aug 2020, 8:59 pm

Alita wrote:
The social distance element is a completely different matter and that's why the schools shut. But teaching kids to wear masks during a pandemic is no different to teaching them to put on seat belts in the car. A simple: "no mask, no outing" approach is all it takes. As an ex-schoolteacher, I know what I'm talking about. Parents often let kids down by pampering them unnecessarily and trying to be their friend instead of their parent.


Mayve you're conflating two separate problems which is understandable as you must've witnessed such frustrating overlaps
It may be true among a portion but I really doubt it for all for the commitment this takes.

I wonder if you have ever taught a child with diagnosed severe autism....im guessing so...
Can you imagine them wearing a mask and being okay with it?

As a person using this site I presume you have autism which most ppl seem to here? Would you be able to tolerate it as a child? I wouldn't. And I was not a pampered child.


And by not tolerate I dont mean an intentional manipulative tantrum whuch I would never have been allowed to have-- I mean a real meltdown
..uncontrollable .which people with ASD have.. My younger son has them daily multiple times and I had them daily --
but wd try to hide so as not to get punished and no amount of beating or enforcement would help me with the mask.



Any kids Ive seen out and about in enclosed areas such as grocery store have been wearing masks.

Their parents seem to have them adjusted to it ok so you're right about that it seems.

But the ones who cannot do it are simply not let in so I dont see them in the first place and how many of those are there? No idea.


My kids cannot and I spent a large sum of money trying to get comfortable or attracyive ones they might take to. They both have ASD.
I cannot go anywhere for errands unless a nurse is willing to watch both so I can go.

I was conflating your statement to mean alongside attending school which is at the forefront of my mind

Masks during the school day type situation. I cannot imagine young kids dealing with school plus masks.


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magz
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07 Aug 2020, 3:10 am

My 7yo NT(/ADHD?) and 8yo diagnosed Aspie do accept wearing masks in enclosed public areas as simply part of current reality. But this is less than an hour a day and the Aspie one often removes her mask and holds it at her face with her hands - it's obviously uncomfortable. It would be probably impossible to successfully force it 6 hours/day at school.
Also, they just can't learn not to touch everything in sight.


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07 Aug 2020, 6:54 am

NUMBER OF INFECTED

The number of people who have been infected with COVID-19 in the U.S. is high. The number is vastly undercounted.

Data suggest that about 3% of Americans, or nearly 10 million people, have been infected with coronavirus. Unfortunately, this data comes from late April and early May, and the virus has spread even further since then. The official COVID-19 case tally, therefore, is a dramatic undercount.

Two different studies reported by the CDC used this technique [random survey] to determine the prevalence of COVID-19. The first study, conducted statewide in Indiana, used nasal swabs and nucleic acid detection (RT-PCR) to determine the prevalence of current infections, which the authors determined to be 1.7%. (They also found that 44% of these were asymptomatic.) The researchers also collected blood samples for antibody tests to determine prior infection, which was determined to be 1.1%. Overall, the team concluded that 2.8% of Indianans were currently or previously infected with coronavirus.

In the second study, researchers only used antibody testing in two counties in the Atlanta area to determine prior infection. They found that 2.5% of those analyzed had tested positive.

Assuming that these figures can be extrapolated nationwide, a prevalence of roughly 3% means that nearly 10 million Americans would have been infected by coronavirus at the time the surveys were conducted. Unfortunately, those surveys were performed in late April and early May, and the virus has spread even further since then. The bottom line is that the current tally of just under 5 million cases is a dramatic undercount.

These findings also highlight the importance of wearing a mask while in indoor public spaces. If nearly half of those infected have no symptoms, then we all must wear a mask to protect those around us lest we are infected and don't know it.

Source: Coronavirus: CDC Data Suggest We Are Undercounting COVID-19 Cases


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blooiejagwa
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07 Aug 2020, 8:10 am

magz wrote:
My 7yo NT(/ADHD?) and 8yo diagnosed Aspie do accept wearing masks in enclosed public areas as simply part of current reality. But this is less than an hour a day and the Aspie one often removes her mask and holds it at her face with her hands - it's obviously uncomfortable. It would be probably impossible to successfully force it 6 hours/day at school.
Also, they just can't learn not to touch everything in sight.


I didn't know you had children! And one has a form of ASD .. Always nice to find out as one knows one can Always share experiences or learn tips, it feels less lonely! :heart:


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magz
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07 Aug 2020, 8:14 am

blooiejagwa wrote:
I didn't know you had children! And one has a form of ASD .. Always nice to find out as one knows one can Always share experiences or learn tips, it feels less lonely! :heart:

I think I never kept it secret... how old are yours?


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07 Aug 2020, 12:57 pm

I always thought you just had a daughter, Magz :)

Now I know you have another youngster, too.



Last edited by kraftiekortie on 07 Aug 2020, 1:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

blooiejagwa
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07 Aug 2020, 12:58 pm

magz wrote:
blooiejagwa wrote:
I didn't know you had children! And one has a form of ASD .. Always nice to find out as one knows one can Always share experiences or learn tips, it feels less lonely! :heart:

I think I never kept it secret... how old are yours?


You might have mentioned it and I forgot.. idk
4 and almost 8


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08 Aug 2020, 8:51 am

AEROSOL TRANSMISSION OF THE CORONAVIRUS

There are cases where people are packed together in an enclosed space — like a church, with singing or shouting — where the transmission looks a little more like airborne transmission.

The infamous choir practice in Washington state is an example of where airborne transmission might have happened. But what made this event so risky was the convergence of many risk factors: the singing activity (during which the infected person released viral particles into the air), the time spent together (the practice was 2.5 hours), and the interaction between the choir members in an enclosed space (not only did they all practice together, they also split up into smaller groups and shared cookies and tea).

Another study from China investigated an outbreak that started at a Buddhist temple event, tracing much of the spread to the confines of one of the buses transporting people to the function. The bus had one sick person aboard, and 24 out of 67 people on that bus got sick, possibly indicating airborne transmission. Those who sat by the windows fared better, indicating the importance of ventilation.

The bottom line, as a trio of engineers from Clarkson University writes in the Conversation, is that “while staying six feet from other people reduces exposure, it might not be sufficient in all situations, such as in enclosed, poorly ventilated rooms.”

We still need to think about the environments we’re in: Indoors is much riskier than outdoors (where greater airflow can disperse drops and aerosols more quickly, and where the environment is less conducive to SARS-CoV-2 survival). And indoors, ventilation can make a big difference. An indoor space where the air is constantly refreshed with air from the outdoors is better than one where the air is stagnant. (The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers has published extensive guidelines on how to reopen buildings with increased ventilation during the pandemic.)

We also still need to think about the activity we’re engaging in. Shouting, singing, and other such activities produce more droplets (of any size) than just sitting quietly.

Morawska hopes that in bringing attention to airborne spread of Covid-19, there can be more attention paid to engineering solutions for indoor spaces to mitigate the spread of the pandemic.

Public health officials have continually stressed social distancing, mask-wearing, and hand-washing as ways to stop the spread of Covid-19. “But have you ever heard a restaurant reopening announce they’ve improved ventilation or increased ventilation? No. This is really the point,” Morawska says. If Covid-19 is in indoor air, we should also be doing something about the air.

Source: Scientists say the coronavirus is airborne. Here’s what that means.

I think the whole point here is that there are engineering solutions to control the spread of the virus and these solutions have been marginalized and ignored.


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08 Aug 2020, 9:06 am

Finally. The World Health Organization has now formally recognized that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, is airborne and that it can be carried by tiny aerosols.

Image

As we cough and sneeze, talk or just breathe, we naturally release droplets (small particles of fluid) and aerosols (smaller particles of fluid) into the air. Yet until earlier this month, the W.H.O. — like the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or Public Health England — had warned mostly about the transmission of the new coronavirus through direct contact and droplets released at close range.

The organization had cautioned against aerosols only in rare circumstances, such as after intubation and other medical procedures involving infected patients in hospitals.

After several months of pressure from scientists, on July 9, the W.H.O. changed its position — going from denial to grudging partial acceptance: “Further studies are needed to determine whether it is possible to detect viable SARS-CoV-2 in air samples from settings where no procedures that generate aerosols are performed and what role aerosols might play in transmission.”

A paper published this week by The Lancet Respiratory Medicine that analyzed the aerosols produced by the coughs and exhaled breaths of patients with various respiratory infections found “a predominance of pathogens in small particles” (under 5 microns). “There is no evidence,” the study also concluded, “that some pathogens are carried only in large droplets.”

[Additional Precautions:}

* Avoid crowds. The more people around you, the more likely someone among them will be infected. Especially avoid crowds indoors, where aerosols can accumulate.

* Ventilation counts. Open windows and doors. Adjust dampers in air-conditioning and heating systems. Upgrade the filters in those systems. Add portable air cleaners, or install germicidal ultraviolet technologies to remove or kill virus particles in the air.

It’s not clear just how much this coronavirus is transmitted by aerosols as opposed to droplets or via contact with contaminated surfaces. Then again, we still don’t know the answer to that question even for the flu, which has been studied for decades.

But by now we do know this much: Aerosols matter in the transmission of Covid-19 — and probably even more so than we have yet been able to prove.

Source: Yes, the Coronavirus Is in the Air


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09 Aug 2020, 7:26 am

More than a third of Americans say they would not get a COVID-19 vaccine right now, even if were free and FDA-approved, according to a new Gallup poll.

Political party affiliation is the biggest difference-maker as 81% of Democrats said they would get a vaccine, while less than half of Republicans, 47%, said they would get the vaccine.

White Americans are more likely than non-White Americans to say they would get a vaccine if it was available, 67% to 59%. That’s despite the fact that “some racial and ethnic minority groups are being disproportionately affected by COVID-19,” as the CDC puts it.

Source: Third of Americans would say 'no' to COVID vaccine - even if it was free


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10 Aug 2020, 12:41 pm

FACEMASK EFFICIENCY

Researchers at Duke University compared 14 commonly available masks and face coverings to see which was most effective at stopping the spread of respiratory droplets. The best face coverings for preventing droplet spread were N95 masks without valves, they found, while fleece coverings and bandanas were shown to be "counterproductive."

Image

The quantitative results are show in Fig. S1 of the following report:

Low-cost measurement of facemask efficacy for filtering expelled droplets during speech


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10 Aug 2020, 6:35 pm

Coronavirus outbreaks and exposures at U.S. schools: Georgia school temporarily closes after 9 students test positive

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Georgia school where students tweeted photos of a crowded hallway to capture back-to-school during the coronavirus pandemic is now temporarily closed due to coronavirus cases.

Nine cases of coronavirus have been confirmed at North Paulding High School, according to multiple reports. The school, which did not have a mask mandate, will be closed for two days for sanitation, Georgia Public Broadcasting reports. Initially, the school suspended students who posted the photos, but at least one of those suspensions has since been reversed, according to the Washington Post.

Schools across the country are reopening for in-person learning as August begins, as the debate on whether reopening schools is safe for students, staff and communities continues.

Take a look at some of the other locations around the country that have experienced quarantines or were forced to shut down due to the coronavirus at educational institutions.

Georgia

As of Aug. 2, 260 employees at Gwinnett Schools, Georgia’s largest public school district, either tested positive for the coronavirus or have come into close contact with a case, the Atlanta-Journal Constitution reported.

A spokeswoman told the AJC that the majority of the cases were a result of community spread, not reopening buildings. Staff were not teaching yet, but had returned to the district for planning for in-person classes.

Tennessee
After a Cookeville High School student in Putnam County was diagnosed with the coronavirus, 80 students needed to quarantine. Most of the contacts occurred prior to the school year beginning, the Tennessean reported.

Seven teachers and staff and a bus driver also tested positive or came into close contact with someone who did. The Tennessean also reported that one other school delayed opening due to a coronavirus case and two others temporarily closed.

Mississippi

Corinth schools in Mississippi were the first to start school in the state, according to the Jackson Clarion-Ledger. There are now seven confirmed cases in the district, at multiple schools. The Washington Post reported that as of Aug. 6, more than 100 students were sent home to quarantine.

Mississipi Gov. Tate Reeves delayed eight districts’ reopening dates last week and mandated masks statewide for residents over age 6.

Indiana
One of the first cases to catch national attention was at the Greenfield-Central schools, where a student tested positive for the coronavirus on the first day back to school. The district traced the student’s movements through the school and told those who had come in contact with the student to quarantine for 14 days.

“We knew it was a when, not if,” Superintendent Harold Olin told the New York Times. The school did not close after the case was reported.

Kansas
School leaders from Southeast Kansas went to a retreat, and now six out of 11 who attended have the coronavirus, according to the Kansas City Star.

The leaders traveled to Branson, Missouri, which recently experienced an uptick in cases. School officials told the Star that they had followed social-distancing procedures like wearing masks and using hand sanitizer. It wasn’t clear whether the cases occurred before the retreat or were contracted during travel.

New Jersey
The Rutgers football team experienced an outbreak of coronavirus cases, with NJ.com reporting on Aug. 3 that sources said the number of cases went up to 28 players, plus members of the staff.

Rutgers football players began voluntary workouts on June 15, with workouts ceasing on July 25 due to an uptick in the number of positive tests. Health officials have tied the outbreak to an on-campus party.

Washington
At least 144 fraternity house residents at the University of Washington have tested positive for the coronavirus, with another 10 students testing positive in association with the outbreak, according to a school news release.

Health experts told the Seattle Times that they believe the virus spread quickly because Greek housing is dense with a close-knit social network between houses. Greek housing is off-campus and policed by the Seattle Police Department.


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11 Aug 2020, 1:54 pm

It is strange how an Aspie mind works. I read a story and I see an interconnect. It is like pieces of an elaborate puzzle.

I read a news article this morning that was titled: 11% of coronavirus patients who lose sense of taste, smell, may suffer long term: 'May become a chronic issue'

When Greg Shuluk, 29, contracted COVID-19 in March, he experienced mild symptoms. He felt feverish, began coughing, and lost his sense of smell and taste. The Westchester, N.Y., native says the cough went away in a month, but now, five months later, his lack of taste and smell persists.

“I can tell if something is sweet or salty, but food tastes super bland now. I can’t really taste it,” Shuluk told Fox News on Tuesday, explaining that he feels his senses are at close to 70% back. “I’m obsessed with seafood. I went and got a lobster and cooked it and could barely taste it.”

Shuluk is one of a number of former COVID-19 patients who have experienced a long-term loss of taste and smell, and doctors say it's unclear when, or if, people like Shuluk will ever get their senses back to their pre-COVID normal.

Indeed, around 11% of coronavirus patients who suddenly couldn’t properly taste their food, or smell through their nose reported the symptoms lasted longer than a month, according to research published in July in JAMA Otolaryngoloy — Head & Neck Surgery.

------------------------------------------

But then I realized I too had experience a loss of taste and smell. But this happened a long time ago and had nothing to do with COVID-19.

I had bariatric surgery to lose weight and for almost a year I lost my sense of taste and smell. I love lobster and shrimp and other forms of seafood. But after surgery, they had no taste. They were totally bland.


Change in the taste, smell or tolerance of food following bariatric surgery is a common phenomenon. One study showed that as many as 97% of patients experience at least one such change following these surgeries.

According to a study conducted by researchers from the University Hospitals of Leicester, which included 103 patients who underwent gastric bypass, 73% reported changes in the taste of food and almost 50% reported changes in smell.

The most commonly reported taste changes were heightened sensitivity to sweet food, sour food and fast food.

The exact cause of these changes following bariatric surgery is not yet clear, but many researchers suspect that fluctuating gut hormones and the effect these have on the nervous system may play a role.

The central nervous system relays hunger, craving and satiety messages between the brain and gastrointestinal tract.

The nerves that carry these messages are affected when a part of the stomach removed, which impacts a person’s sense of taste, smell and satiety.

Ghrelin is a hormone that plays an important role in hunger. A reduced calorie intake and weight loss leads to increased ghrelin production, which makes people feel hungry.

In contrast, weight loss as a result of bariatric surgery leads to decreased ghrelin production, therefore reducing hunger and food intake following the procedure.

Another important hormone, which is involved in satiety, is leptin. This relays messages between the gut and brain about how full a person is and determines whether calories are burned or stored as fat.

Losing weight is thought to increase a person’s sensitivity to these messages, resulting in a person feeling full more easily after eating only small amounts of food.

Source: Taste Changes Following Bariatric Surgery


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12 Aug 2020, 3:04 am

Here’s what we know about Russia’s unverified coronavirus vaccine

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Russia has launched a new Sputnik — this time, a vaccine to combat the coronavirus.

Russian President Vladimir Putin announced in a televised cabinet meeting August 11 that the country is ready to roll out the world’s first COVID-19 vaccine to the general public. Teachers and doctors may be among the first inoculated.

Dubbed Sputnik-V, after the first artificial satellite, the vaccine has been tested in only a small number of people. The announcement came even though no published information is available about the vaccine’s safety and efficacy, and scientists have yet to complete the final phase of clinical testing to determine whether it works. Nonetheless the vaccine has been submitted to the health ministry for registration, comparable to applying for approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

It “works quite effectively. It forms a stable immunity,” Putin declared.

Researchers around the world have been racing to create a vaccine (SN: 7/10/20), but none have been thoroughly vetted yet. Russia has tried various tactics to get in front of the competition, with hackers in the country reportedly trying to steal vaccine data from the United States, Great Britain and Canada. Being the first to approve a vaccine may be a matter of national pride, but the declaration of victory may be premature, some vaccine researchers say.

Usually, vaccines go through three phases of clinical tests. The first two phases test the vaccine in small numbers of people for safety and may collect data on whether people make antibodies or have other responses to the vaccine. The third phase tests the vaccine in thousands of people to determine whether it lowers the infection rate. That third phase of testing has not even started for the Russian vaccine.

In an open letter to the minister of health, the Moscow-based Association of Clinical Trial Organizations urged the government to delay approval of the vaccine until after Phase III data is in.

“Without that data, it seems reckless to proceed to approving the vaccine,” says virologist Onyema Ogbuagu of the Yale School of Medicine. He is leading Phase III testing at Yale of a vaccine candidate from the drug company Pfizer.

While information is limited about Russia’s COVID-19 vaccine, here’s what we know so far.

How does the vaccine work?
Researchers at the Moscow-based Gamaleya Research Institute of Epidemiology and Microbiology, part of the Russian Health Ministry, developed the two-part vaccine. Both parts start with viruses that cause the common cold. Those viruses, adenovirus 5 and adenovirus 26, were each engineered to make the coronavirus’ spike protein. That protein helps the coronavirus latch on to cells and infect them. Since it is on the surface of the virus, it’s also a target for antibodies against the virus.

This approach is similar to other coronavirus vaccines in the works. The University of Oxford working with AstraZeneca uses a chimpanzee adenovirus. And a vaccine devised by China-based CanSino Biologics Inc. is based on adenovirus 5. Johnson & Johnson uses adenovirus 26 for its vaccine. Those vaccines have gone through initial safety tests where participants made antibodies against the virus and didn’t have any serious side effects (SN: 7/21/20).

According to the latest trial information on Sputnik-V, available at clinicaltrials.gov, a U.S. website that tracks clinical trials, 38 people first got a shot containing the engineered adenovirus 26 component. Three weeks later, they received booster injections of the engineered adenovirus 5 component. Results of the study have not yet been published.

Using two adenoviruses instead of one is unusual, but may help solve a potential problem, says Daniel Kuritzkes, a virologist and infectious diseases doctor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Because the body may develop antibodies to the virus carrying the spike protein, a booster shot with that same virus might be rendered useless. The two-step inoculation with different adenoviruses may sidestep that issue.

How many people have been tested?
It’s unclear. The registered trial tested 38 people. That’s “in the ballpark . . . to make sure it doesn’t kill people, essentially,” Ogbuagu says. “That’s a good number for a Phase I study, but that’s just the beginning of vaccine development,” he says.

Russian business people and politicians, including one of Putin’s daughters, have also been given access to the vaccine, Bloomberg reports. And the Russian military completed Phase II tests of the vaccine in July, First Deputy Defense Minister Ruslan Tsalikov said in an interview published in the Argumenty i Fakty newspaper.

Usually, Phase II studies test a vaccine in hundreds of people. But the letter from the clinical trials association says the vaccine has been tested in fewer than 100 people. By contrast, multiple vaccines around the world are now starting Phase III tests with 30,000 people each.

Why are the larger studies needed?
The Phase III tests are what determine whether vaccines actually protect people from infection.

Testing large numbers of people also allows researchers to uncover rare side effects that might not show up in smaller studies, says Walter Orenstein, associate director of the Emory Vaccine Center in Atlanta. Some side effects may show up in 1 in every 1,000 people. “You’re unlikely to detect that in a study of 200 people,” he says.

Even after vaccines are administered to the general public, researchers will be on the lookout for even rarer safety concerns, such as autoimmune diseases triggered by the vaccine, Kuritzkes says. Scientists will also be watching to make sure antibodies made against the vaccine don’t make the disease worse, as has happened with dengue, he says.

Did the Russians win the vaccine race?
“It’s not a contest, or it shouldn’t be,” says Kawsar Talaat, an infectious diseases doctor at the Center for Immunization Research at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. “These are not national products. These are international companies that make these vaccines for the world.” The Sputnik-V vaccine probably would not be approved for use in other countries without Phase III trials.

The best case scenario is that the Russians got lucky and produced a safe and effective vaccine, Talaat says. “The worst is to have a vaccine that doesn’t work and decimates the public’s trust in vaccines.” And there’s no prize for producing a vaccine that doesn’t work or that isn’t safe, scientists say.

Most of the vaccines against COVID-19 now in development have demonstrated that they are at least reasonably safe and are triggering production of antibodies and immune cells that may help protect against the virus, Kuritzkes says. The Russian data have not been made public, so it is impossible to tell whether their similar claims are true. But if the data compare with those from other vaccines, Sputnik-V is likely to be safe and efficacious. “Of course, there’s a big difference between predicting it and proving it,” he says.

Even if one country or company develops a vaccine first, others will be needed, Kuritzkes says. “We need as many vaccine candidates in development as we can muster. No single company or country can produce enough vaccine to vaccinate the world, and the more success we have, the better off everyone is going to be.”


A Georgia School District Has To Quarantine More Than 900 People Over Fears Of Coronavirus Exposure
Quote:
A little over a week after reopening its public schools to in-person classes, a school district in Georgia ordered 925 of its students and staff members to self-quarantine for two weeks after people tested positive for the coronavirus.

There have been 59 positive COVID-19 cases confirmed among students and staff since Cherokee County School District reopened its schools on Aug. 3 with more than 30,000 students attending in-person classes, Superintendent Brian Hightower said in a statement Tuesday.

"We are not hesitating to quarantine students and staff who have had possible exposure," Hightower said.

He also announced that Etowah High School — which has 14 positive COVID-19 cases and 15 tests pending — will be temporarily closing in-person learning until the end of the month. At least 294 of the school's students and staff are under quarantine.

A photo of Etowah High School students crammed together without masks on the first day of school was widely shared on social media.

The district had given students' families a choice between in-person learning and digital classes. Hightower said that while most of the positive cases had affected the district's high schools, he anticipated that middle schools and elementary schools would also require quarantines in the near future.

The announcement came days after another Georgia school that had gone viral for photos of crowded hallways with maskless students said it was closing for two days following nine positive cases.


New Zealand reinstates coronavirus restrictions after first locally transmitted case in 102 days
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New Zealand's most populous city has gone back under lockdown after new locally transmitted coronavirus cases broke the 102-day streak the country had gone without recording a local infection.

New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern confirmed four new locally transmitted coronavirus cases on Tuesday night, and announced that Auckland will temporarily see level three restrictions introduced for three days starting from midday on Wednesday, local time.

All four of the cases were found within one household in South Auckland according to New Zealand's Director-General of Health Dr Ashley Bloomfield. He added that none of the new cases had recently traveled outside of New Zealand.
"We have been preparing for that time, and that time is now," said Dr Bloomfield adding that the "health system is well prepared."

"In line with our precautionary approach we will be asking Aucklanders to take swift actions with us, as of 12 noon tomorrow, Wednesday August 12, we will be moving Auckland to level 3 restrictions," said Ardern.
She added that this will give health officials time to conduct urgent contact tracing and assess the situation.
The new restrictions mean that businesses including restaurants, bars and non-essential shops will have to close. People will also now only be allowed to leave their homes to conduct essential activities such as picking up supplies from grocery stores. Gatherings over 10 people will also be restricted in Auckland.

Schools in Auckland will also be closed for three days. Outside of Auckland, the rest of New Zealand will go into level two restrictions. Under the restrictions groups of no more than 100 people can gather in one place.
Social distancing must also be practiced at hospitality businesses, while public venues such as museums, libraries and pools can open if they comply with public health measures and ensure one meter physical distancing and record keeping.
The new restrictions across Auckland and New Zealand will take place from midday on Wednesday and last at least three days until midnight on Friday.


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My autism is not a superpower. It also isn’t some kind of god-forsaken, endless fountain of suffering inflicted on my family. It’s just part of who I am as a person. - Sara Luterman


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Deinonychus
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12 Aug 2020, 3:23 am



jimmy m
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12 Aug 2020, 12:44 pm

There is another study titled Viable SARS-CoV-2 in the air of a hospital room with COVID-19 patients that adds more support to the fact that COVID-19 is spread by aerosols.

The study concludes with "For aerosol-based transmission, measures such as physical distancing by 6 feet would not be helpful in an indoor setting, provide a false-sense of security and lead to exposures and outbreaks. With the current surges of cases, to help stem the COVID-19 pandemic, clear guidance on control measures against SAR-CoV-2 aerosols are needed , as recently voiced by other scientist."


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