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naturalplastic
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23 May 2020, 12:00 am

Apparently (from an online dictionary) "colon" means the person, not the place.

A "colon" is a "settler", or a "colonist". And you do need the "ie' ending to mean "colony" (in French colon can also mean what it means in English- but that cant be why the restaurant has the word in its name, though could be why the commercial producers picked it ). So apparently the name of restaurant is "the little settler". Or "little colonist". Maybe the restaurant sees itself as a pioneering outpost of French cuisine in Germany. Hense...its a "settler". Or not.



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23 May 2020, 12:12 am

veedubs in my experience [i've owned several] are expensive [when new, substantially discounted at low miles] and built to stay that way [high maintenance]. buyer beware.



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23 May 2020, 12:42 am

naturalplastic wrote:
Apparently (from an online dictionary) "colon" means the person, not the place.

A "colon" is a "settler", or a "colonist". And you do need the "ie' ending to mean "colony" (in French colon can also mean what it means in English- but that cant be why the restaurant has the word in its name, though could be why the commercial producers picked it ). So apparently the name of restaurant is "the little settler". Or "little colonist". Maybe the restaurant sees itself as a pioneering outpost of French cuisine in Germany. Hense...its a "settler". Or not.


I myself blame the Normans for latinising Old English



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23 May 2020, 12:58 am

cyberdad wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Apparently (from an online dictionary) "colon" means the person, not the place.

A "colon" is a "settler", or a "colonist". And you do need the "ie' ending to mean "colony" (in French colon can also mean what it means in English- but that cant be why the restaurant has the word in its name, though could be why the commercial producers picked it ). So apparently the name of restaurant is "the little settler". Or "little colonist". Maybe the restaurant sees itself as a pioneering outpost of French cuisine in Germany. Hense...its a "settler". Or not.


I myself blame the Normans for latinising Old English


To be fair, the Latin was creeping in from all directions, but the Normans decided to bring more of it and their French (which obviously brought a lot more). It's nice how English often has 2-4 ways of saying something, it makes it much easier to avoid using the same word twice (which apparently was something English poets used to really frown upon and why OE poetry relies on so many kennings).



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23 May 2020, 4:37 am

Bravo5150 wrote:
vermontsavant wrote:
Bravo5150 wrote:
vermontsavant wrote:
Bravo5150 wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Wolfram87 wrote:
I'll have to join in with the people saying "I have no idea what this commercial is even trying to say". "Silly black man, you can't use the new VW!"? What was the intended punchline here?

Also, to the people discussing various anal shenanigans; an alternative reading of the restaurant name ("Petit Colon") is "small bowel", which just adds another level of wtf to this thing.


I was wondering that too. IF the word "colon" might mean the same thing that does in English. Lol!


Surprisingly, colon actually means settler. Closer to the word colony as another word for state than it is to bowels. The idea of a restaurant called "Small Bowels" does sound like an interesting idea though.
Both the CNN article and the original post indicated the restaurant was called "Little Colony" as in a settlement.


I still think the idea of opening a restaurant with a menu centered on serving foods meant to clean out one's colon would produce some interesting reactions.
Meals high in fiber would do think trick,plus coffee,coffee speeds up the gastro track.Yogurt is supposed to be good for GI health too 8)


I just found another good menu item on FYE's website. Super Colon Blow breakfast cereal!



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23 May 2020, 7:43 am

I looked on Amazon for Super Colon Blow and found another interesting product. Crapola brand Granola. I don't know how to post a picture, but check it out.



naturalplastic
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23 May 2020, 8:36 am

funeralxempire wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Apparently (from an online dictionary) "colon" means the person, not the place.

A "colon" is a "settler", or a "colonist". And you do need the "ie' ending to mean "colony" (in French colon can also mean what it means in English- but that cant be why the restaurant has the word in its name, though could be why the commercial producers picked it ). So apparently the name of restaurant is "the little settler". Or "little colonist". Maybe the restaurant sees itself as a pioneering outpost of French cuisine in Germany. Hense...its a "settler". Or not.


I myself blame the Normans for latinising Old English


To be fair, the Latin was creeping in from all directions, but the Normans decided to bring more of it and their French (which obviously brought a lot more). It's nice how English often has 2-4 ways of saying something, it makes it much easier to avoid using the same word twice (which apparently was something English poets used to really frown upon and why OE poetry relies on so many kennings).


Latin entered English directly from dead Latin from the monks who kept learning alive in the monastaries of the dark ages, and Latin entered English by way of living French because of the Norman Conquerors. The Normans almost, but not quite, changed English from being a Germanic language to being a Romance language. But even before the Normans England was half conquered by the Danish Vikings, and Scotland was settled by Norwejian Viking invaders who also trickled down into England. The Vikings were also Germanic. So even before the Normans English already had duplicate words for the same things. Duplicate but similar sounding Germanic words. In English speaking countries you can either "raise" a child(the Viking word), or you can "rear" a child (the Anglo Saxon word). Go figure! :lol:

Shirt and skirt used to be the same kinda garment before the words evolved subtle differences in meaning (one word was Anglosaxon, and the other is Norse, I forget which is which).

So yes...English does have a large vocabulary.

English is both the most invasive language in the world, and is probably also the most invaded language in the world.



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23 May 2020, 1:57 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Apparently (from an online dictionary) "colon" means the person, not the place.

A "colon" is a "settler", or a "colonist". And you do need the "ie' ending to mean "colony" (in French colon can also mean what it means in English- but that cant be why the restaurant has the word in its name, though could be why the commercial producers picked it ). So apparently the name of restaurant is "the little settler". Or "little colonist". Maybe the restaurant sees itself as a pioneering outpost of French cuisine in Germany. Hense...its a "settler". Or not.


I myself blame the Normans for latinising Old English


To be fair, the Latin was creeping in from all directions, but the Normans decided to bring more of it and their French (which obviously brought a lot more). It's nice how English often has 2-4 ways of saying something, it makes it much easier to avoid using the same word twice (which apparently was something English poets used to really frown upon and why OE poetry relies on so many kennings).


Latin entered English directly from dead Latin from the monks who kept learning alive in the monastaries of the dark ages, and Latin entered English by way of living French because of the Norman Conquerors. The Normans almost, but not quite, changed English from being a Germanic language to being a Romance language. But even before the Normans England was half conquered by the Danish Vikings, and Scotland was settled by Norwejian Viking invaders who also trickled down into England. The Vikings were also Germanic. So even before the Normans English already had duplicate words for the same things. Duplicate but similar sounding Germanic words. In English speaking countries you can either "raise" a child(the Viking word), or you can "rear" a child (the Anglo Saxon word). Go figure! :lol:

Shirt and skirt used to be the same kinda garment before the words evolved subtle differences in meaning (one word was Anglosaxon, and the other is Norse, I forget which is which).

So yes...English does have a large vocabulary.

English is both the most invasive language in the world, and is probably also the most invaded language in the world.
English is certainly the worlds most complex and sophisticated language but it is also had more contributions from other languages than any other language,there is most of Europe tucked neatly inside the English language,not to mention Hebrew because it's a Christian biblical influenced language.(I can't really speak for Asian languages like Mandarin or something).


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23 May 2020, 2:07 pm

vermontsavant wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Apparently (from an online dictionary) "colon" means the person, not the place.

A "colon" is a "settler", or a "colonist". And you do need the "ie' ending to mean "colony" (in French colon can also mean what it means in English- but that cant be why the restaurant has the word in its name, though could be why the commercial producers picked it ). So apparently the name of restaurant is "the little settler". Or "little colonist". Maybe the restaurant sees itself as a pioneering outpost of French cuisine in Germany. Hense...its a "settler". Or not.


I myself blame the Normans for latinising Old English


To be fair, the Latin was creeping in from all directions, but the Normans decided to bring more of it and their French (which obviously brought a lot more). It's nice how English often has 2-4 ways of saying something, it makes it much easier to avoid using the same word twice (which apparently was something English poets used to really frown upon and why OE poetry relies on so many kennings).


Latin entered English directly from dead Latin from the monks who kept learning alive in the monastaries of the dark ages, and Latin entered English by way of living French because of the Norman Conquerors. The Normans almost, but not quite, changed English from being a Germanic language to being a Romance language. But even before the Normans England was half conquered by the Danish Vikings, and Scotland was settled by Norwejian Viking invaders who also trickled down into England. The Vikings were also Germanic. So even before the Normans English already had duplicate words for the same things. Duplicate but similar sounding Germanic words. In English speaking countries you can either "raise" a child(the Viking word), or you can "rear" a child (the Anglo Saxon word). Go figure! :lol:

Shirt and skirt used to be the same kinda garment before the words evolved subtle differences in meaning (one word was Anglosaxon, and the other is Norse, I forget which is which).

So yes...English does have a large vocabulary.

English is both the most invasive language in the world, and is probably also the most invaded language in the world.
English is certainly the worlds most complex and sophisticated language but it is also had more contributions from other languages than any other language,there is most of Europe tucked neatly inside the English language,not to mention Hebrew because it's a Christian biblical influenced language.(I can't really speak for Asian languages like Mandarin or something).


While English may be the most complicated when expressed verbally, I think the Japanese have us beat in terms of writing. We express our written ideas in a simple twenty six letter alphabet system. The Japanese write with a combination of both heiroglyphics type system and an alphabet when writing.



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23 May 2020, 2:14 pm

Bravo5150 wrote:
vermontsavant wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
funeralxempire wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
naturalplastic wrote:
Apparently (from an online dictionary) "colon" means the person, not the place.

A "colon" is a "settler", or a "colonist". And you do need the "ie' ending to mean "colony" (in French colon can also mean what it means in English- but that cant be why the restaurant has the word in its name, though could be why the commercial producers picked it ). So apparently the name of restaurant is "the little settler". Or "little colonist". Maybe the restaurant sees itself as a pioneering outpost of French cuisine in Germany. Hense...its a "settler". Or not.


I myself blame the Normans for latinising Old English


To be fair, the Latin was creeping in from all directions, but the Normans decided to bring more of it and their French (which obviously brought a lot more). It's nice how English often has 2-4 ways of saying something, it makes it much easier to avoid using the same word twice (which apparently was something English poets used to really frown upon and why OE poetry relies on so many kennings).


Latin entered English directly from dead Latin from the monks who kept learning alive in the monastaries of the dark ages, and Latin entered English by way of living French because of the Norman Conquerors. The Normans almost, but not quite, changed English from being a Germanic language to being a Romance language. But even before the Normans England was half conquered by the Danish Vikings, and Scotland was settled by Norwejian Viking invaders who also trickled down into England. The Vikings were also Germanic. So even before the Normans English already had duplicate words for the same things. Duplicate but similar sounding Germanic words. In English speaking countries you can either "raise" a child(the Viking word), or you can "rear" a child (the Anglo Saxon word). Go figure! :lol:

Shirt and skirt used to be the same kinda garment before the words evolved subtle differences in meaning (one word was Anglosaxon, and the other is Norse, I forget which is which).

So yes...English does have a large vocabulary.

English is both the most invasive language in the world, and is probably also the most invaded language in the world.
English is certainly the worlds most complex and sophisticated language but it is also had more contributions from other languages than any other language,there is most of Europe tucked neatly inside the English language,not to mention Hebrew because it's a Christian biblical influenced language.(I can't really speak for Asian languages like Mandarin or something).


While English may be the most complicated when expressed verbally, I think the Japanese have us beat in terms of writing. We express our written ideas in a simple twenty six letter alphabet system. The Japanese write with a combination of both heiroglyphics type system and an alphabet when writing.
Yea,like I said,I can't speak for Asian languages,the amount of symbols to memorize in Chinese languages must be overwhelming.


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23 May 2020, 2:24 pm

1000 Kanji are taught in Japanese schools and 2000 are required to be considered literate.



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23 May 2020, 9:40 pm

naturalplastic wrote:
English is both the most invasive language in the world, and is probably also the most invaded language in the world.


On the flipside British colonies allowed the entry of words from languages subject to the British crown

jungle - hindi
curry - Tamil
bungalow - hindi
chocolate - Mexico
moccasin - native American
safari - Swahili
guru - hindi
loot - hindi
bongo - african
chimpanzee - african
ebony - egypt
banana - africa
banjo - africa
jazz - africa
jive - africa
tango - africa
zombie - africa
voodoo - africa/caribbean
zebra -africa
mojo - africa

There's like 100s of words in the English vocabluary from India too many to list



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24 May 2020, 8:38 pm

Bravo5150 wrote:
I looked on Amazon for Super Colon Blow and found another interesting product. Crapola brand Granola. I don't know how to post a picture, but check it out.


https://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live ... ion-127611

An old SNL joke