Professor charged in autistic son’s drowning

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ASPartOfMe
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28 Oct 2019, 12:45 am

Michigan professor faces manslaughter rap in autistic son's backyard pool drowning

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A professor in Michigan has been charged with manslaughter in the March accidental drowning death of his 16-year-old autistic son.

Investigators said the boy, Sam Koets, drowned after climbing into an above-ground pool with icy water in the backyard of a Georgetown Township, Mich., home where he lived with his parents and siblings, according to reports.


"There are facts in this case that I think the public will find disturbing," said Capt. Mark Bennett of the Ottawa County Sheriff's Office, according to MLive.com.

Timothy Koets, 50, was accused Friday of failing to supervise his son who investigators said had been left alone in the backyard, Fox 17 Grand Rapids reported

Investigators found the boy, who had severe autism, in the pool unresponsive with his arms bound, the station reported.

Koets teaches computer science at Grand Rapids Community College, according to the station.

He was released on bail Friday after a not guilty plea was entered on his behalf by a judge, MLive.com reported.

Koets, who was also charged with child abuse, told the judge he wasn’t going to flee.

Investigators also said Sam had been living in the home in deplorable conditions that included sleeping in the basement on a soiled mattress, Fox 17 reported.


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cyberdad
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28 Oct 2019, 4:07 am

Parents of severe autistic kids have it tough. I would like to know more about whether this IT professor deliberately neglected his son or whether he was overwhelmed because of work to keep an eye on him? where were his siblings?



EzraS
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28 Oct 2019, 4:53 am

This sort of thing has always been an issue with me.



cyberdad
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29 Oct 2019, 12:49 am

EzraS wrote:
This sort of thing has always been an issue with me.


In what way?



EzraS
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29 Oct 2019, 1:59 am

cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
This sort of thing has always been an issue with me.


In what way?


In that I might wander off and end up drowning in a swimming pool or hit by a car. I require constant supervision.



cyberdad
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29 Oct 2019, 2:18 am

EzraS wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
This sort of thing has always been an issue with me.


In what way?


In that I might wander off and end up drowning in a swimming pool or hit by a car. I require constant supervision.


really? even now?



EzraS
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29 Oct 2019, 2:24 am

cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
This sort of thing has always been an issue with me.


In what way?


In that I might wander off and end up drowning in a swimming pool or hit by a car. I require constant supervision.


really? even now?


Yep. It's fairly common with my level of autism. There's another member here the same level we share a lot in common and it's the same even though 27.



cyberdad
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29 Oct 2019, 2:30 am

EzraS wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
This sort of thing has always been an issue with me.


In what way?


In that I might wander off and end up drowning in a swimming pool or hit by a car. I require constant supervision.


really? even now?


Yep. It's fairly common with my level of autism. There's another member here the same level we share a lot in common and it's the same even though 27.


I don't know what to say? I'm clearly ignorant on what many on this forum have to go through



EzraS
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29 Oct 2019, 4:19 am

cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
This sort of thing has always been an issue with me.


In what way?


In that I might wander off and end up drowning in a swimming pool or hit by a car. I require constant supervision.


really? even now?


Yep. It's fairly common with my level of autism. There's another member here the same level we share a lot in common and it's the same even though 27.


I don't know what to say? I'm clearly ignorant on what many on this forum have to go through


I don't keep up much with others situations either. And I don't talk much about myself.



domineekee
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29 Oct 2019, 4:28 am

cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
This sort of thing has always been an issue with me.


In what way?


In that I might wander off and end up drowning in a swimming pool or hit by a car. I require constant supervision.


really? even now?

This makes me concerned about my 4 year old nephew. He keeps on asking "now can I go for a wander?"
If we tell him explain to him the dangers of electricity he will nod and look as though he understands, then look for a screwdriver and fiddle around with sockets as soon as no one is looking.

He's demand resistant. What would be the best way to convey to him the danger he would put himself in, please?



EzraS
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29 Oct 2019, 5:07 am

domineekee wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
cyberdad wrote:
EzraS wrote:
This sort of thing has always been an issue with me.


In what way?


In that I might wander off and end up drowning in a swimming pool or hit by a car. I require constant supervision.


really? even now?

This makes me concerned about my 4 year old nephew. He keeps on asking "now can I go for a wander?"
If we tell him explain to him the dangers of electricity he will nod and look as though he understands, then look for a screwdriver and fiddle around with sockets as soon as no one is looking.

He's demand resistant. What would be the best way to convey to him the danger he would put himself in, please?


I don't know. With me my brain doesn't cooperate with what I know and understand. It's hard to explain. A lot times I'm told "no" or "stop" because for whatever reason don't realize what I'm doing.
.
With a kid that little I don't know how much of what he is doing is autism and how much is being that young.

When I was 4 I was nonresponsive. I would just be looking at something and make no sign that I heard or understood what I was being told.



domineekee
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29 Oct 2019, 5:31 am

Thanks for the reply.



Kraichgauer
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29 Oct 2019, 11:51 pm

The kid's arms were bound when he drowned. I think this goes beyond an overwhelmed parent.


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EzraS
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29 Oct 2019, 11:56 pm

Kraichgauer wrote:
The kid's arms were bound when he drowned. I think this goes beyond an overwhelmed parent.


Wow I missed that part.



Kraichgauer
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29 Oct 2019, 11:59 pm

EzraS wrote:
Kraichgauer wrote:
The kid's arms were bound when he drowned. I think this goes beyond an overwhelmed parent.


Wow I missed that part.


Changes everything, doesn't it?


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EzraS
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30 Oct 2019, 12:02 am

Kraichgauer wrote:
EzraS wrote:
Kraichgauer wrote:
The kid's arms were bound when he drowned. I think this goes beyond an overwhelmed parent.


Wow I missed that part.


Changes everything, doesn't it?


Yes.