First Ever Severe Heatwave Warning for the UK, help!

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Mountain Goat
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18 Jul 2022, 10:30 am

Biscuitman wrote:
I would love to see town centres become much greener. actual pathways of trees and plants to shops. sides of building covered in greenery etc


That would be nice, as long as the greenery does not damage the buildings.



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18 Jul 2022, 11:16 am

Biscuitman wrote:
I would love to see town centres become much greener. actual pathways of trees and plants to shops. sides of building covered in greenery etc


They do that in Spain. Tower blocks of flats with plants growing in them and on them. They look gorgeous.


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18 Jul 2022, 11:43 am

This sort of thing makes me angry. These poor guards! No one should be wearing bearskins in 40C. Ridiculous. These pictures sum up Britain today- clinging to old traditions despite the fact they're hurting people :roll: :lol:

https://www.mylondon.news/weather/royal ... d-24519888


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18 Jul 2022, 12:20 pm

Saw this in MyLondon,

UK heatwave: People given very tight time limit for showers to help stop us running out of water
Thames Water has said formal restrictions aren't necessary at the moment but they are not ruled out at a later date
By Rory Bennett
16:20, 11 JUL 2022 Updated16:22, 11 JUL 2022
https://www.mylondon.news/news/uk-world ... y-24458412
"
Many Brits are being urged to ration water with temperatures set to rise to 35C later this week. What is predicted to be the longest heatwave in years kicked off before the weekend, and will last another eight days or so according to forecasts. ...
"


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18 Jul 2022, 1:02 pm

Our heat wave is going to continue for weeks.
Many prisons and small jails don’t have AC in the South.My state is one of the few where the units have cooling.
https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/texas ... 841/?amp=1


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18 Jul 2022, 1:05 pm

KitLily wrote:
This sort of thing makes me angry. These poor guards! No one should be wearing bearskins in 40C. Ridiculous. These pictures sum up Britain today- clinging to old traditions despite the fact they're hurting people :roll: :lol:

https://www.mylondon.news/weather/royal ... d-24519888

They need a jug of ice under that hat.


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18 Jul 2022, 1:07 pm

'Climate change affects everyone': Europe battles wildfires in intense heat

Quote:
Authorities across southern Europe battled on Sunday to control huge wildfires in countries including Spain, Greece and France, with hundreds of deaths blamed on soaring temperatures that scientists say are consistent with climate change.

In Spain, helicopters dropped water on the flames as heat above 40 Celsius (104 Fahrenheit) and often mountainous terrain made the job harder for firefighters.

Shocked residents watching thick plumes of smoke rising above the central western Jerte valley said the heat was making their previously green and cool home more like Spain's semi-arid south.

A study published in June in the journal 'Environmental Research: Climate' concluded it was highly probable that climate change was making heatwaves worse. read more

More than 1,000 deaths have been attributed to the nearly week-long heatwave in Portugal and Spain so far. Temperatures in Spain have reached as high as 45.7C (114F).

Spain's weather agency issued temperature warnings for Sunday, with highs of 42 Celsius (108 Fahrenheit) forecast in Aragon, Navarra and La Rioja, in the north. It said the heatwave would end on Monday, but warned temperatures would remain "abnormally high".

Fires were raging in several other regions including Castille and Leon in central Spain and Galicia in the north on Sunday afternoon. Firefighters stabilised a blaze in Mijas, in Malaga province, and said evacuated people could return home.

In France, wildfires have now spread over 11,000 hectares (27,000 acres) in the southwestern region of Gironde, and more than 14,000 people have been evacuated, regional authorities said on Sunday afternoon.

More than 1,200 firefighters were trying to control the blazes, the authorities said in a statement.

France issued red alerts, the highest possible, for several regions, with residents urged "to be extremely vigilant".

In Italy, where smaller fires have blazed in recent days, forecasters expect temperatures above 40C in several regions in coming days.

Around 1,000 firefighters tried to control 13 forest and rural fires in the centre and north of Portugal, the largest being near the northern city of Chaves.

Portugal's Health Ministry said late on Saturday that in the last seven days 659 people died due to the heatwave, most of them elderly. It said the weekly peak of 440 deaths was on Thursday, when temperatures exceeded 40C (104F) in several regions and 47C (117F) at a meteorological station in the district of Vizeu in the centre of the country.

By Saturday, there were 360 heat-related deaths in Spain, according to figures from the Carlos III Health Institute.

Portugal was grappling with extreme drought even before the recent heatwave, according to data from the national meteorological institute. Some 96% of the mainland was already suffering severe or extreme drought at the end of June.

Emergency and Civil Protection Authority Commander Andre Fernandes urged people to take care not to ignite new fires in such bone-dry conditions.

In Greece the fire brigade said on Saturday 71 blazes had broken out within a 24-hour period.


Britain could see hottest temperature on record this week
Quote:
Britain was braced for temperatures to hit 40C for the first time this week, with ministers urging the public to stay at home as the heatwave caused train services to be cancelled, one London airport to shut its runway and some schools to close.

Much of Europe is baking in a heatwave that has pushed temperatures into the mid-40s Celsius (over 110 Fahrenheit) in some regions, with wildfires raging across tinder-dry countryside in Portugal, Spain and France. read more

Britain's government triggered a "national emergency" alert as temperatures were forecast to surpass the previous record of 38.7C (102F) in the Cambridge University Botanic Garden in 2019.

On Monday, the temperature nudged 38C in southern England and a new high was recorded in Wales, according to Britain's Meteorological Office. It is expected to be even hotter on Tuesday, when the 40C level is forecast to be exceeded.

"We've got a difficult 48 hours coming," Kit Malthouse, a minister in charge of government coordination, told BBC radio.

The heat brought widespread travel problems.

London's Luton Airport said flights were suspended after a surface defect was found on the runway, and the heat caused flights to be diverted from the Royal Air Force's Brize Norton air base. read more

The national rail network urged passengers not to travel unless necessary, with some services - including a key route between northeastern England and London - not running during parts of Tuesday.

London's metro network imposed temporary speed restrictions, meaning it would run a reduced service with journeys taking longer than normal.

Jake Kelly from Network Rail said he hoped normal operations would resume on Wednesday, when temperatures are forecast to fall, but that would depend on "the damage that the weather does to the infrastructure over the next couple of days". read more

The government has urged schools to stay open but many were due to close earlier than usual, normal uniform demands were ditched and end-of-term sports days were cancelled. Some schools were shut, resorting to lockdown-style online lessons.

The public were warned not to swim in open water to cool off, with police reporting two teenagers had died after getting into trouble while swimming in a lake and a river.

Some factories also brought their opening hours forward, to prevent workers on the hottest jobs, such as welding, from falling ill.

At least one major zoo, at Chester, said it would close for two days, while in parliament, normal rules that require lawmakers to wear jackets or ties were eased.

Shopper numbers were down 7.3% across Britain compared to last week, according to researcher Springboard, although coastal towns saw a 9% increase as people flocked to the seaside.

The Health Security Agency (UKHSA) raised the heat health warning to Level 4 for England for Monday and Tuesday for the first time ever, while the Met Office issued its first ever extreme heat 'Red warning’.

Heir to the throne Prince Charles said while on a trip to southwest England that the weather showed how vital it was that the country stick to its climate commitments.


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Last edited by ASPartOfMe on 18 Jul 2022, 1:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

kitesandtrainsandcats
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18 Jul 2022, 1:11 pm

Misslizard wrote:
Our heat wave is going to continue for weeks.
Many prisons and small jails don’t have AC in the South.My state is one of the few where the units have cooling.
Oh, that is a concern.

Brings to mind a time in 1990s when Dad's brother in law was a Deputy Sheriff on the KC side of Missouri.
They had a fellow they had a warrant for call them to come bring him back to MO from a rural jail in the deep south.
The guy actually said, "Get me out of here."


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18 Jul 2022, 1:45 pm

The heatwave is still forecast to break on Wednesday, the 20th, in the UK. Maximum of 26C (79F) in London on that date. And 20's for the rest of the week.



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18 Jul 2022, 1:55 pm

We have a old saying in New York. “It ain’t the heat it’s the humidity”. At 7PM in London the temperature was 35 C with a dew point of 7.2 C. The dew point measures the amount of moisture in the air. A 7.2 dew point is considered bone dry in New York during the summertime. We are expecting a heat wave here this week the temperatures will be about 33 to 35 celsius but the dew point around 20 C. This is very uncomfortable, one could be pouring sweat after being outside for 5 minutes. This is also not unusual here in the summertime. The humidity is even worse and more constant in the Gulf States then in New York.

This is not to downgrade what you are experiencing across the pond. You are just not used to it. That the air is both so hot and so dry is the reason for all of the fires breaking out.

Also keep in mind that people vary in the amount of heat they can tolerate. As noted the elderly, very young, people with illnesses and so on can tolerate a lot less.

kraftiekortie wrote:
The heatwave is still forecast to break on Wednesday, the 20th, in the UK. Maximum of 26C (79F) in London on that date. And 20's for the rest of the week.

This is a good thing. The negative effects of heat both on people and infrastructure build up over time. The weather service here defines a heatwave as 3 consecutive days over 90 F in any one location.


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18 Jul 2022, 2:01 pm

Phoenix Park, in Dublin, Ireland, broke the all-time Irish hottest temperature for the 20th and 21st centuries: 33 Celsius, or 92 Fahrenheit.

Apparently, unless something changes, 33.3 Celsius, in Kilkenny Castle in 1887, will remain the all-time Irish record.



Last edited by kraftiekortie on 18 Jul 2022, 2:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Joe90
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18 Jul 2022, 2:02 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
The heatwave is still forecast to break on Wednesday, the 20th, in the UK. Maximum of 26C (79F) in London on that date. And 20's for the rest of the week.


That's what I heard too. And we have rain on Wednesday and Friday. It is not going to stay in the late 30s for 8 days in the UK.

Quote:
Saw this in MyLondon,

UK heatwave: People given very tight time limit for showers to help stop us running out of water
Thames Water has said formal restrictions aren't necessary at the moment but they are not ruled out at a later date

By Rory Bennett
16:20, 11 JUL 2022 Updated16:22, 11 JUL 2022
https://www.mylondon.news/news/uk-world ... y-24458412
"
Many Brits are being urged to ration water with temperatures set to rise to 35C later this week. What is predicted to be the longest heatwave in years kicked off before the weekend, and will last another eight days or so according to forecasts. ...


Is this scaremongering? We've had heatwaves like this before, a few years ago it stayed around 30 for weeks but the land did not dry up and nobody was short of water. Hosepipe ban, understandable. We've had that too. But nobody was short of water to drink.


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18 Jul 2022, 2:15 pm

the humidity here is ridiculous right now

still 30C out there



kraftiekortie
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18 Jul 2022, 2:18 pm

I've encountered 32 Celsius at midnight in NYC.

It does get more humid at night, so the dewpoint will be higher, so you will feel more uncomfortable.



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18 Jul 2022, 2:27 pm

Over 1,000 dead according to this headline: (but that’s heatwave wide across Europe not just the UK)

https://www.salon.com/2022/07/18/histor ... e_partner/


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18 Jul 2022, 2:28 pm

Joe90 wrote:
Is this scaremongering?

They will have to answer that for themselves.
As for me ...
I'm not going to doubt it - I've lived in 2 different US states where in several different decades there have been droughts and water restrictions; one of them being not most people's primary suspect for water restrictions of Virginia in the 1980s & one time to the point where the city utility asked people to not flush their toilets every time it was used.

:arrow: Have some documentation of that,

https://www.upi.com/Archives/1980/10/02 ... 339307200/
"
UPI Archives
Oct. 2, 1980
Drought and water restrictions in Virginia

NORFOLK, Va. -- A five-minute timer ticks away in the bathroom of the Boyce family to make sure no one takes excessively long showers.

At the Simpkins household, there are strict orders not to run the washing machine unless it has a full load of clothes.

And at the local Coca-Cola plant, about 25 percent of production _ which uses tons of water _ has been shifted to the Richmond operation.

The above measures are the result of drought and unprecedented water rationing that began Wednesday in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, a section of Chesapeake and area Navy installations.

Officials say the program, requiring 690,000 residents and businesses to reduce consumption by 25 percent, will remain in effect until the area receives sufficient rain to make up for a four-month drought.

Dorothy Oppert of Norfolk says she began conserving in August when restrictions on non-essential use were imposed.

'I don't know what else I can do to cut back,' she said. 'I'm not washing my car or watering my lawn. I take a bath twice a week, flush the toilet about three times a day and I don't keep the water running when I brush my teeth.'

'It's taking some getting use to,' said Lorretta Boyce, mother of five. 'If you're use to unwinding in the shower, you say 'Gosh, is it already over?''

Ironically, the rationing took effect as the area received a second consecutive day of showers that dropped nearly an inch of rain _ the heaviest rainfall in more than a month.

But it wasn't enough to avert the rationing, announced last week.

'Every little bit helps, but we didn't have enough to make any real difference in our situation,' said John Kemper, Norfolk's public utilities director. 'We need a whole lot of rain and this isn't a whole lot of rain.'

The affected area has received just 10 inches of precipitation, less than half its normal amount, since June 1. It draws water from Norfolk's reservoirs, now at 51.2 percent of their 15 billion gallon capacity.

The area's first rationing follows a similar water allocation program six days ago in northern New Jersey.

Consumers who don't do their part to reduce consumption to 50 million gallons each day face stiff water surcharges.

Earlier this week, Norfolk began a radio, television and newspaper campaign, entitled, 'Water: Not A Drop To Spare,' offering conservation tips.

Car and window washing firms are required to close until conditions improve, and Kemper said some businesses may be forced to curtail operations and lay off workers.

The Norfolk Shipbuilding Co. said it began conservation efforts last week but doesn't know yet whether it will have to reduce operations and release any employees.

'We hope we wouldn't have to, but right now we don't know,' said a spokesman for the 4,000-worker shipyard, the area's biggest private employer.
"

and

SPIRITS SINK IN VIRGINIA BEACH AS WATER DEAL SUCCUMBS TO STATE POLITICS
By Peter Baker
July 5, 1995
https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/ ... 342b2a6a7/
"
Just outside her knickknack store, where seashell bracelets go for $6 apiece, there is water stretching off into the horizon. Water is what drew the thousands of visitors who flocked here this weekend. It is the lifeblood of this resort city, the blanket that provides its economic security.

So, with all this water, why can't Joan Scholefield flush her toilet?

Or water her lawn? Or fill her tea kettle?

Virginia's largest city has been so short of safe drinking water for so long that many activities, from home building to car washing to gardening, are tightly restricted. Restaurants don't serve it unless asked. Swimming pool owners truck in water or wait for rain.

"Everybody understands the water restrictions . . . but it gets frustrating," said Scholefield, owner of Sko's Jewelry and Gifts. "It has actually gotten to the point where people save their bathtub water and take it outside to water their plants. You don't flush your toilets all day unless you have to. You don't wash your clothes at night. You leave the water in your tea kettle and just use whatever's there rather than fill it again."

A bitter irony lost on so many summer frolickers here is that water is both Virginia Beach's greatest asset and its worst enemy.

That's why a proposed accord with North Carolina to pipe in water was so critical and has occupied the attention of officials ranging from the mayor to the governor. And that's why the collapse of the deal last week in a partisan feud devastated a city that has been pursuing the agreement for 13 years.

"We've had to live with restrictions greater than any other city in Virginia," Mayor Meyera E. Oberndorf said. "I don't think unless you are living through it that you can truly appreciate it."

Since 1982, after a drought that required the city to ration water, Virginia Beach has been trying to solve its chronic shortage by building a 76-mile pipeline across the southern part of the state to Lake Gaston, a man-made body of water straddling the line with North Carolina. And since 1982, North Carolina has stood in the way.

Finally, after all the lawsuits and bureaucratic battles, the two sides hammered out an interstate compact that would allow Virginia Beach to withdraw 60 million gallons a day. The Virginia General Assembly had until last Friday to seal the deal.

But in the end, the legislature never convened because of a political spat between Gov. George Allen (R) and Democratic lawmakers over when the special session would adjourn.

Left in the middle are 417,000 residents, who face the prospect of stifling restrictions for years to come.

"I just wish the politicians would quit fighting and get something done," said Ted Pletcher, who owns Auntie Anne's pretzel shop across Atlantic Avenue from the ocean. "It's in the paper every day: Deal's done. Deal's off. To the average person, it's just a frustration."

The city has considered the obvious solution but concluded that tapping into the ocean would be prohibitively expensive and environmentally unsound. Desalting seawater, officials estimate, would double Virginia Beach's water and sewer rates -- already among the nation's highest at an average of $50 a month.

To get by, the city has been buying millions of gallons a day from neighboring Norfolk and in 1992 imposed tough conservation measures that have cut average usage to among the nation's lowest.

Outdoor use of city water is all but banned, including washing cars and watering lawns. Residents can use three-gallon buckets for those purposes but no hoses or sprinklers. Ornamental fountains are prohibited. Commercial carwashes must use recycled water.

Many residents resort to digging wells in their back yards. Others install water-saving toilets. Those with less money stand outside the bathroom door with a watch while their children shower.

Development, too, is limited. The city has granted no new extensions of public water lines since 1992, allowing hookups only for properties that were entitled at the time of that moratorium. Businesses considering a move to Virginia Beach often are discouraged because of the water shortage.

"We're on the edge here," said John E. Schwartz, executive director of the local Chamber of Commerce. "We want to be sure to eliminate that asterisk . . . {so} there's no reason to eliminate Virginia Beach as an economic development site because of water."

But economics are at least partially responsible for the unraveling of the Lake Gaston deal. Although one region benefited, another cried foul.

In the rural countryside of Southside and Southwest Virginia, local leaders saw the plan as outright poaching of their resources. Tapping Lake Gaston for drinking water, they feared, might force new environmental regulations on the region's own use of Lake Gaston water and that of local industries. The costs of complying could strangle their economic development.

The opposition of a region where Allen is popular made the issue all the stickier for the governor, who publicly supported the Lake Gaston project. Critics cited the precedent as a danger to every other region of the state, including Northern Virginia.

"They're going to put a straw in our drink up here and take our water," said Del. Stephen D. Newman, a Lynchburg Republican who considers himself a loyal "Allenista" but broke with his governor over the issue. "One day someone may come from Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania and start putting a straw down in your glass of water and start pulling water out of there."

Back at the beach, officials are frantically trying to accommodate those and other concerns to resurrect the compact. Allen has vowed to help craft an alternative deal that will not require legislative approval.

But after 13 years of struggling and waiting, after coming so close to a solution only to watch it slip away, there is a sense of profound disappointment that politics in Richmond pulled the plug on the deal last week. "Water is not a luxury. Water is a necessity," Mayor Oberndorf said. "If there were ever a time when the elected officials needed to respond as statesmen and not as politicians, this was the time."
"


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