Medications: brand names vs generic names

Page 1 of 1 [ 11 posts ] 

SteelMaiden
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Aug 2006
Age: 29
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,841
Location: London

11 Jan 2011, 1:49 am

Is it just because I'm a pharmacology student or are there other people here that wince when you see someone refer to a drug by its brand name? I.e. "I take Celexa", "Seroquel is....." ARGH


_________________
I am a partially verbal classic autistic. I am a pharmacology student with full time support.


Kaybee
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Oct 2009
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,446
Location: A hidden forest

11 Jan 2011, 3:05 am

My inner pedant says: If they take the brand name, it makes sense to refer to the brand name. If they take the generic, they should refer to the generic name. It is a minor thing, however.


_________________
"A flower falls, even though we love it; and a weed grows, even though we do not love it."


kx250rider
Supporting Member
Supporting Member

User avatar

Joined: 15 May 2010
Age: 51
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,200
Location: Dallas, TX & Somis, CA

11 Jan 2011, 12:51 pm

I think it's like how we all say we'll "Xerox" that paper, even if the copier at hand is an IBM or a Canon. Or we put something in the Fridge, even if we have a Whirlpool refrigerator (as opposed to the original Frigidaire).

Charles



gramirez
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 9 Nov 2008
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 1,880
Location: Barrington, Illinois

11 Jan 2011, 1:24 pm

People are more likely to be familiar with brand names than generics. If I were to mention "Prozac", everyone would know what I was talking about. If I said "Fluoxetine", the generic prozac, I doubt many people would know what that is.


_________________
Reality is a nice place but I wouldn't want to live there


nick007
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 4 May 2010
Age: 36
Gender: Male
Posts: 22,545
Location: was Louisiana but now Vermont

11 Jan 2011, 5:56 pm

I'm going to say what most are probably thinking.
EXTREMELY CONFUSING


_________________
But I don't want to go among mad people, Alice remarked.
Oh, you can't help that, said the Cat: we're all mad here. I'm mad. You're mad.
How do you know I'm mad? said Alice.
You must be, said the Cat, or you wouldn't have come here.


SteelMaiden
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Aug 2006
Age: 29
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,841
Location: London

12 Jan 2011, 8:36 am

Fair enough. I have the BNF (British National Formulary book) at home and I think it is terribly confusing to have multiple brand names for one medication. And different countries sometimes use different brand names. Too confusing


_________________
I am a partially verbal classic autistic. I am a pharmacology student with full time support.


markko
Raven
Raven

User avatar

Joined: 8 Dec 2010
Age: 59
Gender: Male
Posts: 107
Location: Wisconsin, USA

12 Jan 2011, 4:39 pm

SteelMaiden wrote:
Is it just because I'm a pharmacology student or are there other people here that wince when you see someone refer to a drug by its brand name? I.e. "I take Celexa", "Seroquel is....." ARGH


You're going to hate most doctors and nurses. They interchange brand names and generic names all the time, sometimes in the same sentence. I'm one of those nurses. All the places I've worked allow brand name and generic drugs to be interchanged. A doctor will give me a verbal order for "meperidine 50 mg IM q 3-4 hrs prn pain" and I'll write it as "Demerol." If I get an order for "Advil 200 mg PO q 6 hrs for fever >37.5°," I'll write it as ibuprofin."



the_curmudge
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 21 Aug 2010
Age: 69
Gender: Male
Posts: 612
Location: Florida

12 Jan 2011, 6:34 pm

Of course, to be precise people should use the generic name. But it may be several syllables long and contain hidden pronunciation traps that snare the uninitiated. The brand name is simple to pronounce and three syllables long, tops, and was designed to stick in the mind of consumers.



Kaybee
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 6 Oct 2009
Age: 33
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,446
Location: A hidden forest

12 Jan 2011, 6:39 pm

SteelMaiden wrote:
... I think it is terribly confusing to have multiple brand names for one medication. And different countries sometimes use different brand names. Too confusing


I agree. It would be clearer if everyone used the generic, but most people don't want or find it hard to remember such long words, I think.


_________________
"A flower falls, even though we love it; and a weed grows, even though we do not love it."


SteelMaiden
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Aug 2006
Age: 29
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,841
Location: London

27 Jan 2011, 9:27 am

markko wrote:
You're going to hate most doctors and nurses. They interchange brand names and generic names all the time, sometimes in the same sentence. I'm one of those nurses. All the places I've worked allow brand name and generic drugs to be interchanged. A doctor will give me a verbal order for "meperidine 50 mg IM q 3-4 hrs prn pain" and I'll write it as "Demerol." If I get an order for "Advil 200 mg PO q 6 hrs for fever >37.5°," I'll write it as ibuprofin."


Oh dear lol.


_________________
I am a partially verbal classic autistic. I am a pharmacology student with full time support.


SteelMaiden
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 19 Aug 2006
Age: 29
Gender: Female
Posts: 3,841
Location: London

27 Jan 2011, 9:27 am

Kaybee wrote:
I agree. It would be clearer if everyone used the generic, but most people don't want or find it hard to remember such long words, I think.


Fair enough


_________________
I am a partially verbal classic autistic. I am a pharmacology student with full time support.