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jeddy
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22 Apr 2011, 8:50 am

hello would it be safe to live in south ireland as i am thinking of a few countries id like to move to with ireland one of those options- is ireland safe for english to live in? if so what are the local customs? thank you



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22 Apr 2011, 9:18 am

I can't really tell you, because I've never been there. I'm sure that there are some other people here who know.


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22 Apr 2011, 9:39 am

Really need for an Irish person to tell you. I lived there a long time ago, and I remember my mum having problems, with her Scottish accent, in certain places. But that was years ago. I'm sure someone Irish can give you more up to date info.



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22 Apr 2011, 10:16 am

jeddy wrote:
hello would it be safe to live in south ireland as i am thinking of a few countries id like to move to with ireland one of those options- is ireland safe for english to live in? if so what are the local customs? thank you


Lol, of course. Irish people are normal people, not barbaric bog savages. There are thousands upon thousands of British in Ireland (I think they are the largest non-
irish population), and they all get along fine.

As for customs, you aren't obliged to act in any way, this is a free country.

Edit; If you are worried about racism and that kinda thing (there's virtually none among decent people), move to a student city like Galway or Carlow. I'm very suprised Henbane's relative had any problems, although that was probably during the '80's, where north/south/british relations were strained. All that has died down now.


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jeddy
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22 Apr 2011, 11:03 am

heers guys south ireland it is! once ifinish college at 18ish



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22 Apr 2011, 11:10 am

a) It is called the Republic of Ireland b) Yes it's quite safe (to my knowledge).

My dad's family comes from Letterkenny (in Donegal county) and it's a quite nice area.



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22 Apr 2011, 11:26 am

I've been to Dublin and it's a friendly and cosmopolitan city.British citizens have never needed a passport to enter Eire and vice versa.


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jeddy
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22 Apr 2011, 11:41 am

cheers but i presume if i wanted i could after so long still get a passport?



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22 Apr 2011, 12:54 pm

Even up in nationalist parts of Northern Ireland it's safe for English people. I never encountered any real hostility in my trips to Northern Ireland - bewilderment, yes, but never hostility.

You'll be find in most parts of the island (apart from the scummy areas that you'll find in England).



ryan93
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22 Apr 2011, 1:54 pm

Tequila wrote:
Even up in nationalist parts of Northern Ireland it's safe for English people. I never encountered any real hostility in my trips to Northern Ireland - bewilderment, yes, but never hostility.

You'll be find in most parts of the island (apart from the scummy areas that you'll find in England).


On a recent trip, we accidentally drove through Falls Road, and Shankill Road. A little unlucky :lol:

Yeah, there are bad areas everywhere, I'd just recommend staying away from Ballymun in Dublin, and (to a lesser degree) Tallagh.

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cheers but i presume if i wanted i could after so long still get a passport?


I think a passport is needed to get into Ireland from any country these days, even by ferry (I could be wrong though)...


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Ambivalence
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22 Apr 2011, 5:50 pm

ryan93 wrote:
I think a passport is needed to get into Ireland from any country these days, even by ferry (I could be wrong though)...

I don't remember needing one on the ferry from Wales (a while ago!) - this says it shouldn't be needed, but it's probably different if you're intending to stay!


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23 Apr 2011, 2:22 am

ryan93 wrote:
Tequila wrote:
Even up in nationalist parts of Northern Ireland it's safe for English people. I never encountered any real hostility in my trips to Northern Ireland - bewilderment, yes, but never hostility.

You'll be find in most parts of the island (apart from the scummy areas that you'll find in England).


On a recent trip, we accidentally drove through Falls Road, and Shankill Road. A little unlucky :lol:


I drank in republican (possibly even disso-leaning?) boozers up in Creggan. I lived.

(Still hate the place though.)



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23 Apr 2011, 5:37 pm

I checked - my lil' brother apparently did need his passport when he worked there a while back.


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23 Apr 2011, 7:37 pm

I cannot say anything about the prejudices against UKistanis apart from the fact that some are employed at $employer and do not get shot. However, seeing that I immigrated here as well, a few comments about moving:
* Irish time: learn it, love it. Yes, the Irish have the same timezone as the UK, but the perception of time seems to be quite a bit different. Don't get upset if things take longer.
* public transport can be the best or the worst experience you had. Sometimes both during the same journey.
* If possible, avoid getting a phone line and internet connection from the state company. UPC is better in that respect
* Tesco Mobile will probably be your best choice as a carrier if you do many calls abroad
* Do not trust the O2 callcenter on ANYTHING! They managed to tell me 3 inorrect things to 3 questions I asked.
* for renting a place, www.daft.ie is quite nice.
* remember that Ireland is a country of emigrants and immigrants. You will hear and see quite a number of languages. If your native language is not English and you hear it spoken in the street, it can be a conversation starter
* Ireland is a good place to quit smoking. If only because that and going broke are the only 2 options.


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jeddy
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24 Apr 2011, 10:05 am

LostInEmulation wrote:
I cannot say anything about the prejudices against UKistanis apart from the fact that some are employed at $employer and do not get shot. However, seeing that I immigrated here as well, a few comments about moving:
* Irish time: learn it, love it. Yes, the Irish have the same timezone as the UK, but the perception of time seems to be quite a bit different. Don't get upset if things take longer.
* public transport can be the best or the worst experience you had. Sometimes both during the same journey.
* If possible, avoid getting a phone line and internet connection from the state company. UPC is better in that respect
* Tesco Mobile will probably be your best choice as a carrier if you do many calls abroad
* Do not trust the O2 callcenter on ANYTHING! They managed to tell me 3 inorrect things to 3 questions I asked.
* for renting a place, www.daft.ie is quite nice.
* remember that Ireland is a country of emigrants and immigrants. You will hear and see quite a number of languages. If your native language is not English and you hear it spoken in the street, it can be a conversation starter
* Ireland is a good place to quit smoking. If only because that and going broke are the only 2 options.

cheers m8



RobotGreenAlien2
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03 Feb 2012, 8:48 pm

The ferry / airline may have its own pollicy but the UK and Ireland have no passport treaty, photo ID as all you need.