who here is left-handed or right-handed or ambidextrous?

Page 2 of 7 [ 108 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 7  Next


left-handed, right-handed, or ambidextrous?
I'm a leftie :alien: 17%  17%  [ 12 ]
I'm a rightie :arrow: 53%  53%  [ 37 ]
I'm somewhere in between/ambi :star: 24%  24%  [ 17 ]
I wanna nice yummy ice cream! :chef: 6%  6%  [ 4 ]
Total votes : 70

auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 97,372
Location: the island of defective toy santas

14 Aug 2015, 2:45 am

I'm the only leftie out of my whole family tree. mebbe in me gestation my wiring harness got all SNAFU'd for some reason. also the only one not wearing glasses, and the only one over 6' tall.



Britte
Veteran
Veteran

Joined: 23 Nov 2014
Gender: Female
Posts: 8,136
Location: @

14 Aug 2015, 2:51 am

I'm left-handed : ).



Fraljmir
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 13 Aug 2015
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 136

14 Aug 2015, 2:51 am

When I write, I hold the pen in the conventional way (I think). But I hold the pen with all three fingers, rather than one resting behind it if that makes sense.



auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 97,372
Location: the island of defective toy santas

14 Aug 2015, 2:53 am

Britte wrote:
I'm left-handed : ).

YAY :bounce:



auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 97,372
Location: the island of defective toy santas

14 Aug 2015, 2:55 am

Fraljmir wrote:
When I write, I hold the pen in the conventional way (I think). But I hold the pen with all three fingers, rather than one resting behind it if that makes sense.

I used all four fingers on one side [mostly contorted so that all fingertips would fit on the same spot] with the thumb bracing opposite. I eventually grew out of this in junior high school, after much nagging from teachers, who since they failed to convert me to a rightie [in the stoned age that was fairly common] and instead concentrated their energies to making me write more normally. they mostly failed.



Myriad
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2015
Age: 25
Posts: 315

14 Aug 2015, 2:56 am

Fraljmir wrote:
The question wasn't directed to me but learning to write's an interesting one for me. I've always had 'horrible' hand-writing. No-matter how much I practiced, it looked like a fourth graders scribbles. Quite frustrating really, hand-writing just never came naturally to me, I avoid it whenever possible. I also had a great deal of trouble learning to tie my shoes, which was embarrassing. It took me until I was 14 or 15 to get a grasp of tying my shoes. Glad I don't have to worry about that anymore.


That's frustrating! Maybe it's some sort of fine motor skill issue. I was kind of the opposite when it came to handwriting but I'm still slow and awkward when I'm trying to do knots. Especially with balloons!

auntblabby wrote:
Myriad wrote:
It probably depends on the actual task, too. I need to use my right hand if the task requires great precision, like handwriting. How did you go with learning to write?

very slowly and painstakingly. since my left arm was totally casted and out of commission, I had to use it as a brace to rest my right hand on, so it would not quiver so much. then I would plot out one stroke of each letter or number at a time, then the next stroke, then the next one, each taking a few seconds, and after about a minute I might be able to write one line, like the "pay to" line on a check. then I was be basically exhausted after that short effort, and it would take me a half-hour to recover. it would make me nauseous and dizzy, that amount of effort. granted, I was pretty effed up after my accident, I was one big fractured contused piece of raw meat. I was riding my bike in the hills when some deer bounded out from the bushes on both sides of me, too fast for me to react, and the next thing I knew I flew over the handlebars and landed in a crushed bloody heap on the hard rough pavement, in a rapidly expanding pool of my own blood. I almost bled out but somehow [I suspect providence] I made it to the hospital on my own power. spent the next week there in post-op with both arms in casts and slings, with just enough movement in the right arm to slowly/clumsily/messily feed myself. anyways, I just crudely gripped the pen and forced my right hand to slowly move the pen across the paper. fast-forward to now, I can slowly write with my right hand, slowly and clumsily brush my teeth, and do other personal tasks. but probably never as fluidly as with my naturally dominant left hand, my brain didn't seem to want to entirely rewire itself.


I'm sorry you had to go through all that! Glad you made it out safe though. I reckon your writing is something that will continue to improve over time, as long as you practice. :)


_________________
Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 129 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 100 of 200
You seem to have both neurodiverse and neurotypical traits
AQ: 39 / 50


auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 97,372
Location: the island of defective toy santas

14 Aug 2015, 3:01 am

Myriad wrote:
I'm sorry you had to go through all that! Glad you made it out safe though. I reckon your writing is something that will continue to improve over time, as long as you practice. :)

I have a hard time tying balloons also! :oops: like my fingertips seem to be short of both facility and strength under pressure. for the longest time I had something called an "intentional tremor" as though even at rest I was like a cold engine in a car in fast idle. I couldn't relax fully until I was in my 50s, after beta blocker therapy.



Fraljmir
Snowy Owl
Snowy Owl

User avatar

Joined: 13 Aug 2015
Age: 25
Gender: Male
Posts: 136

14 Aug 2015, 3:04 am

I'm still very poor at knots and those sort of things in general, that being said I'm a very efficient touch typer on computers (90-105 WPM), which seems like it would be a fine motor skill? Unsure. Maybe I just never had the patience to sit down and try to learn knots. I still only know one basic knot, and that's pretty much it- it does the job for me though.

Come to think of it I could also never learn guitar or any instrument (I managed to learn very, very basic keyboard). I can't process where my fingers need to be fast enough.



auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 97,372
Location: the island of defective toy santas

14 Aug 2015, 3:36 am

I tried for several months to learn how to play guitar, I made the mistake of starting on acoustic [the kind with laceratingly stiff and sharp steel strings], when I should have used a classical with gut strings instead. that said, my fingers would just not learn how to twist themselves into those complicated and compact fingerings. the fretboard needed to be 50% larger for my hand. and the callouses would never develop, my hands just kept getting cut until I said to hell with it and gave the guitar to my niece. on piano/organ I also failed to be able to make my fingers do their duty, music teacher told me I was wasting her time. as for the typing keyboard, no great shakes there either, the ink on the backspace key tends to fade before all the others. :oops:



Myriad
Deinonychus
Deinonychus

User avatar

Joined: 11 Jun 2015
Age: 25
Posts: 315

14 Aug 2015, 3:44 am

Fraljmir wrote:
I'm still very poor at knots and those sort of things in general, that being said I'm a very efficient touch typer on computers (90-105 WPM), which seems like it would be a fine motor skill? Unsure. Maybe I just never had the patience to sit down and try to learn knots. I still only know one basic knot, and that's pretty much it- it does the job for me though.


Not sure! Maybe touch-typing requires a different type of skill, because you're not having to manipulate a 3-D object like when you're tying a knot. But then again, I can tie my shoes just fine but struggle with balloons and other tasks (like putting things on a key-ring). :chin:


_________________
Your neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 129 of 200
Your neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 100 of 200
You seem to have both neurodiverse and neurotypical traits
AQ: 39 / 50


auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 97,372
Location: the island of defective toy santas

14 Aug 2015, 3:55 am

I didn't learn how to tie my shoes until I was almost 9. :oops: to this day I rarely tie my shoes.



auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 97,372
Location: the island of defective toy santas

14 Aug 2015, 3:56 am

it's a tie between the lefties and icecream lovers :mrgreen:



Rockymtnchris
Velociraptor
Velociraptor

User avatar

Joined: 3 Jul 2015
Age: 57
Posts: 495
Location: Colourful Colorado

14 Aug 2015, 4:00 am

Interesting question for me...I never learned cursive writing, I simply don't have the fine finger dexterity to do it. When I PRINT on paper, I use my right hand, and the results look quite fourth gradish (if not third). Years ago in college I had to go to the blackboard in one of my classes and face another student to the left of me (while facing the class) who was also writing stuff on the board. Subconsciously I held the chalk in my left hand to write my answers to the instructor's questions. It wasn't after I sat down and began writing righthanded in pen again in my notebook that the dude sitting behind me pointed out that I had indeed used my left hand at the board, and the printing was quite legible, though still not very neat. Out of curiousity, I tried writing in my notebook with my left hand and it was so bad it made what my right hand could do look like calligraphy.
Later on I tried writing in chalk on blackboards as well as dry erase markers on the more modern whiteboards, and there is not much difference between what my left and right hands can do writing LARGE with a THICKER instrument. In smaller work such as a pen on a notepad, my right hand still does much better, thus I can conclude I'm righthanded.
FWIW, before I bought a word processing typewriter, one of my professors did ask me if I was having my child do my papers I was handing in because my printing looked so juvenile despite proper grammar usage and so forth.


_________________
"Small talk is for small minds."

Neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 125 of 200
Neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 93 of 200

RAADS:
Total score-161.0 Language-18.0 Social relatedness-69.0 Sensory/motor-39.0


neilson_wheels
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 11 Mar 2013
Age: 50
Gender: Male
Posts: 2,404
Location: London, Capital of the Un-United Kingdom

14 Aug 2015, 4:03 am

I'm right handed have always been some what ambi and I developed this more for work. My father, suspected aspie, is also right handed but could only do certain things left handed.

Can I still have ice cream too?



auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 97,372
Location: the island of defective toy santas

14 Aug 2015, 4:06 am

neilson_wheels wrote:
I'm right handed have always been some what ambi and I developed this more for work. My father, suspected aspie, is also right handed but could only do certain things left handed. Can I still have ice cream too?

you can eat all the ice cream your stomach can take :chef:



auntblabby
Veteran
Veteran

User avatar

Joined: 12 Feb 2010
Gender: Male
Posts: 97,372
Location: the island of defective toy santas

14 Aug 2015, 4:09 am

Rockymtnchris wrote:
Interesting question for me...I never learned cursive writing, I simply don't have the fine finger dexterity to do it. When I PRINT on paper, I use my right hand, and the results look quite fourth gradish (if not third). Years ago in college I had to go to the blackboard in one of my classes and face another student to the left of me (while facing the class) who was also writing stuff on the board. Subconsciously I held the chalk in my left hand to write my answers to the instructor's questions. It wasn't after I sat down and began writing righthanded in pen again in my notebook that the dude sitting behind me pointed out that I had indeed used my left hand at the board, and the printing was quite legible, though still not very neat. Out of curiousity, I tried writing in my notebook with my left hand and it was so bad it made what my right hand could do look like calligraphy.
Later on I tried writing in chalk on blackboards as well as dry erase markers on the more modern whiteboards, and there is not much difference between what my left and right hands can do writing LARGE with a THICKER instrument. In smaller work such as a pen on a notepad, my right hand still does much better, thus I can conclude I'm righthanded. FWIW, before I bought a word processing typewriter, one of my professors did ask me if I was having my child do my papers I was handing in because my printing looked so juvenile despite proper grammar usage and so forth.

IMHO that professor was a jerk, not to put too fine a point on it. but what else is new? anyways, I suspect the reason of your equal left/right facility with the chalk, can be chalked up [ :lol: ] to the fact that you are using not as fine a motor skill in that your whole arm and shoulder do most of the work in manipulating the chalk on the board, with the fingers just holding on for the most part. just a thought. :idea: does this make sense?