who here is left-handed or right-handed or ambidextrous?

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left-handed, right-handed, or ambidextrous?
I'm a leftie :alien: 17%  17%  [ 12 ]
I'm a rightie :arrow: 53%  53%  [ 37 ]
I'm somewhere in between/ambi :star: 24%  24%  [ 17 ]
I wanna nice yummy ice cream! :chef: 6%  6%  [ 4 ]
Total votes : 70

auntblabby
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14 Aug 2015, 4:10 am

I hope some more lefties show up here :bounce:



Rockymtnchris
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14 Aug 2015, 4:11 am

auntblabby wrote:
I didn't learn how to tie my shoes until I was almost 9. :oops: to this day I rarely tie my shoes.

I still have big problems tying bows and knots, so wearing Mary Jane style shoes works out very well for me, as there's no laces, just buckles (or velcro through hooks on some).

As for the big board writing versus pen-on-paper, I suspect you're right about the upper muscle usage playing a factor.


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auntblabby
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14 Aug 2015, 4:14 am

Rockymtnchris wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
I didn't learn how to tie my shoes until I was almost 9. :oops: to this day I rarely tie my shoes.

I still have big problems tying bows and knots, so wearing Mary Jane style shoes works out very well for me, as there's no laces, just buckles (or velcro through hooks on some). As for the big board writing versus pen-on-paper, I suspect you're right about the upper muscle usage playing a factor.

I wonder how many other aspies have fine motor control issues in general?



neilson_wheels
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14 Aug 2015, 4:28 am

I think it's fairly common, I don't have an figures to back that up.



auntblabby
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14 Aug 2015, 4:30 am

all I know is that me and my older brother were always clumsy and gauche.



neilson_wheels
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14 Aug 2015, 4:41 am

I know exactly what you are saying, although I had to look up the meaning of gauche, add a big dollop of uncoordination (SP?) too. People used to throw things at me just to laugh at my attempts to catch them.
I have resolved the fine motor skills to a fair degree, I need to focus on the immediate area, like zooming in on the specific task and excluding any peripheral distractions. Obviously this does not work for something like playing guitar where a lot is by feel only.



Rockymtnchris
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14 Aug 2015, 4:46 am

auntblabby wrote:
Rockymtnchris wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
I didn't learn how to tie my shoes until I was almost 9. :oops: to this day I rarely tie my shoes.

I still have big problems tying bows and knots, so wearing Mary Jane style shoes works out very well for me, as there's no laces, just buckles (or velcro through hooks on some). As for the big board writing versus pen-on-paper, I suspect you're right about the upper muscle usage playing a factor.

I wonder how many other aspies have fine motor control issues in general?

Remember though, in my situation, Sensory Processing Disorder is my primary diagnosis. H.F.A. is only secondary. For those that believe Hi-Function Autism is something different from A.S, then I would still have to self-diagnose Aspergers.
FWIW, having sometimes severe shakes from a hypoglycemic condition doesn't help matters for me, either.


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Neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 125 of 200
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RAADS:
Total score-161.0 Language-18.0 Social relatedness-69.0 Sensory/motor-39.0


auntblabby
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14 Aug 2015, 4:49 am

in basic training both me and my brother were picked on for being clumsy. they would throw stuff at us to watch us spaz out in trying to catch said items, only to have the hit us square in the head. partly due to unequal leg length [I was assembled out of irregular cast-off parts at a shift change ;) ] I never could march properly either.



auntblabby
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14 Aug 2015, 4:50 am

Rockymtnchris wrote:
FWIW, having sometimes severe shakes from a hypoglycemic condition doesn't help matters for me, either.

I had hypo also for many decades, which became pre-diabetes/metabolic syndrome, until I figured out it was my diet. I changed the diet and it went away. :)



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14 Aug 2015, 5:02 am

auntblabby wrote:
in basic training both me and my brother were picked on for being clumsy. they would throw stuff at us to watch us spaz out in trying to catch said items, only to have the hit us square in the head. partly due to unequal leg length [I was assembled out of irregular cast-off parts at a shift change ;) ] I never could march properly either.

I used to hate it in school when I would ask someone to hand me something and they would decide to send it to me "air mail" after announcing, "here, think fast!" Rarely did I ever catch their thrown objects, and often I would get hit in some place like the nose, or even more humiliating, in the "jewels". :oops:
FWIW, the first time I ever heard the use of "spaz" was when it was directed at me around fifth or sixth grade due to my frequently shaky hands "spazzing out", to this day I truly believe that term originated at the grade school I attended.
Despite my father having made a career out of the Air Force, I never tried to get into the military because I believed I would flunk their physical and psychological examinations.
BTW, I have psychological issues related to my SPD which prevent me from changing what foods I eat.


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"Small talk is for small minds."

Neurodiverse (Aspie) score: 125 of 200
Neurotypical (non-autistic) score: 93 of 200

RAADS:
Total score-161.0 Language-18.0 Social relatedness-69.0 Sensory/motor-39.0


auntblabby
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14 Aug 2015, 5:11 am

Rockymtnchris wrote:
auntblabby wrote:
in basic training both me and my brother were picked on for being clumsy. they would throw stuff at us to watch us spaz out in trying to catch said items, only to have the hit us square in the head. partly due to unequal leg length [I was assembled out of irregular cast-off parts at a shift change ;) ] I never could march properly either.

I used to hate it in school when I would ask someone to hand me something and they would decide to send it to me "air mail" after announcing, "here, think fast!" Rarely did I ever catch their thrown objects, and often I would get hit in some place like the nose, or even more humiliating, in the "jewels". :oops: FWIW, the first time I ever heard the use of "spaz" was when it was directed at me around fifth or sixth grade due to my frequently shaky hands "spazzing out", to this day I truly believe that term originated at the grade school I attended. Despite my father having made a career out of the Air Force, I never tried to get into the military because I believed I would flunk their physical and psychological examinations.

all the males in my family somehow ended up in the army, either by draft or having no other choices. it was #1 on my list of things never to do, but god laughs at our plans. :pale: after being homeless for a spell, all that army BS looked a lot more inviting. so I signed on the dotted line for 4 years of indentured servitude in uncle sam's army. they ended up having to do psychiatric waiver and health waiver on me, due to psychiatric history and health issues. they were desperate for GIs at that time, otherwise I woulda been kicked to the curb. I graduated basic and AIT [job training in the army] at the bottom of my class, 1/4 bolo'ed out, I was close to going with 'em. the only reason I survived was because the drill's attention was taken up by willfully insubordinate rebels with attitudes, whereas I learned early on to keep my head down and say "yes sergeant/no sergeant." the rebels would have been technically superior servicemembers compared to me [smarter, not clumsy or addled], but they just couldn't keep from mouthing off and refusing orders. I don't know what that says about the army at that time at least.



kraftiekortie
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14 Aug 2015, 5:26 pm

Right-handed, though I do some things with my left hand.

I did somewhat okay after I broke my right wrist in 1975. I was able to learn to write passably with my left hand (though I lost that ability later).

It's possible that I was forced, to a certain extent, to be right-handed. I have a "left-bias" sometimes.

I picked "ice cream," by the way.



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14 Aug 2015, 5:42 pm

I'm a rightie cause I learned how to do it right!

(I didn't pick icecream - I'm lactose intolerant. Boo!)


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JWS
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14 Aug 2015, 5:52 pm

Definitely ambidextrous! I started out definitely a rightie, but using my left hand also felt natural, so I became more ambidextrous the older I've become. How's that for interesting? (by the way, My dad was a leftie, and my mom is a rightie)


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auntblabby
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14 Aug 2015, 6:10 pm

kraftiekortie wrote:
Right-handed, though I do some things with my left hand. I did somewhat okay after I broke my right wrist in 1975. I was able to learn to write passably with my left hand(though I lost that ability later). It's possible that I was forced, to a certain extent, to be right-handed. I have a "left-bias" sometimes. I picked "ice cream," by the way.

can you feel the weather in your healed wrist? just curious. what flavor of ice cream do you like? I used to love chocolate malt and peanut butter-flavor :chef:



auntblabby
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14 Aug 2015, 6:11 pm

JWS wrote:
Definitely ambidextrous! I started out definitely a rightie, but using my left hand also felt natural, so I became more ambidextrous the older I've become. How's that for interesting? (by the way, My dad was a leftie, and my mom is a rightie)

are you the average or median of your parents in other areas as well? are either of your parents at least partly ambidextrous also?